Am I missing something? (Salary)

Discussion in 'General Education' started by KinderWonder, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. Irissa

    Irissa Cohort

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    Nov 2, 2009

    Our health Insurance is $650 a month and union dues are 60 a month. Take out taxes. Now consider that I have 2 kids a car payment, a mortgage and other bills to pay. Not enough really but about what I made when I worked for the government. Only difference is government health insurance is WAY cheaper.
     
  2. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Nov 2, 2009

    My hubby and I both have summer jobs, but we have them because we love them, not for the money. I'd do the job for free, and have often considered donating my salary back to be a scholarship where I work. We use the money for extras, like paying ahead on bills, back-to-school clothes, etc. It pays basically an extra month's salary, which is nice, but not needed to get by.
     
  3. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Nov 3, 2009

    well, it depends where you work, since districts pay different amounts. But, in general, teachers do not make the money that other professionals make.
     
  4. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

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    Nov 3, 2009

    Same here! While I am not a single parent, when I graduated from college and got my first job I could not afford rent and bills on my own. All of my friends with equal education (in different fields) were moving out, getting apts. etc...and I was living at home. I didn't mind it, but literally could not afford to live on my own on my salary. How sad.....

     
  5. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Nov 4, 2009

    I think the over riding factor is most BS degrees afford a job with a starting salary to live on. Teaching , going way back, figured the "lady" teaching" had a husband who would make enough for both. I think it reflects on our society the respect for teachers in many areas when you can go be a prison guard with a HS education and make the same starting salary with BETTER benefits. At least down the road from my house.
     
  6. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Nov 4, 2009

    I have never taught for the money, but I have been blessed with a dh that can supplement my income. My last position paid about 38k a year, which after taxes worked out to about $600 a week. That was without benefits. If I were single, I would have been well below poverty level in my area. I was also commuting an hour each way (you take whatever job you can find right now), so factor in about $100 in gas each week. So about $500 a week, and I was buying stuff for the room constantly.

    My dh, however, was pulling in about twice that much at that point in his professional life. Doing just as much work, commuting on his bike, and getting free lunch twice a week.

    So yeah. The salary doesn't bother me, but the lack of respect associated with it does. I actually did an extra year at college, we've both worked just as hard, worked the same hours (I work on my classroom alllll summer), I've put in more professional development than he could even FIND in his line of work, etc. And yet.... half the salary.
     
  7. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Nov 4, 2009

    Priorities in America are 1. Instant gratification 2. Bigger car, house, boat, salary,TV, the newest phone, Ipod, video game etc,
    3. Vacations
    Im not sure what # education is but its WAY down the list.
    But I did not go into teaching for the $$$. The non-monetary rewards are incredible.
     
  8. cmorris

    cmorris Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2009

    A single teacher should NOT be below the poverty line. That should be unacceptable. A professional should not have to be married in order to survive. As a single mother, I certainly have a gripe about the salary. While, as others have mentioned, no one goes into teaching for the big bucks, it should still afford someone the basics.
     
  9. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Nov 4, 2009

    Exactly.

    I make $32,000. My friend who is a nurse makes $50,000. My boyfriend who is an engineer makes $60,000.

    I went through a 5-year program. They both went through 4-year programs.

    I work 55+ hours per week PLUS I'm always bringing work home. They work 40 and actually have a life when they leave work.

    I'm not complaining, really...I chose my career knowing the stakes. I love my job. However, in comparison to other professions, teacher get majorly ripped off IMO. In other countries, teachers are treated as respected professionals and they make the same as others with the same education.
     
  10. Blkjacq

    Blkjacq Companion

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    Nov 4, 2009

    I agree with most people that it's the difference in extra hours vs actual hours worked. Also, as a teacher, I am required have a Masters and take additional classes each year for PD. Other professions may require classes, but most pay or reimburse the fees. I'm in debt from my Masters and sincerely happy that I had sponsorship for my National Board Cert fees - thanks Mom!
     
  11. NJArt

    NJArt Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2009

    I feel I make a good salary, but relative to what people make with the same amount of education it doesn't quite add up. On the other hand, there are a lot of perks like holidays off and summers. (Summers are necessary... if not for that time off, I think more teachers would burn out MUCH faster.) Compansation also varies widely from state to state, and even district to district within the state. Teachers in NJ make a good salary, even starting salary, and in my district we only pay $15/month toward our health insurance ($20 co-pay). This includes health, vision and even dental. The benefits alone make a BIG difference and I feel really fortunate. Of course our cost of living is also higher with some of the highest property taxes and median houses are generally around 400K. It's all relative. Bottom line, do what you will love doing, not what you want to settle for. Why not combine the two and be a school nurse? lol
     
  12. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Nov 4, 2009

    Where I live, beginning teachers make mid 40000, with a masters degree, 43000. When my husband and I are BOTH teaching in this district, we'll be doing really well for ourselves. Of course we don't live in an area with a too high cost of living.
     
  13. Hoot Owl

    Hoot Owl Aficionado

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    Nov 5, 2009

    Many teachers' salaries are supplemental to their husband's salary, the husband being the primary bread winner.

    I can't complain about my salary at all, I think I'm well-paid for working 190 days a year. There are a lot of other professions who make more, but then there's a lot who work a full year and make about the same.

    My time off is the most important thing to me at this point in my life.

    You can't buy time.
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 5, 2009

    I'm in N NJ. I make good $$ but our contracts are hard-fought and we're asked for 'give backs' nearly every negotiations time. I tutor between 7-8 hours per week (at $65-70 per hour) in addition to my full time teaching, plus I do bus duty every day to supplement my income. I have my second kid in college, paying off loans on the first son's college, 2 car payments and a mortgage. I'm also living in a state with one of the highest (if not the highest) taxes in the country. It's all relative.
     
  15. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Nov 5, 2009

    That's another good point. My boyfriend doesn't have to have any education beyond a bachelors, but his work will pay for him to get his masters. I am required (by my district-not my state) to take 6 grad credits every 5 years. I will not be reimbursed for the cost.
     
  16. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    Nov 5, 2009

    One thing to consider when we compare our salaries to other jobs, is the surplus supply of teachers compared to what there are for nurses and engineers, etc. A great engineer is a lot of times harder to find then a great teacher. Supply and demand.
     
  17. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Nov 5, 2009

    I don't really know about that...At my boyfriend's work they had about 15 co-op student workers (Engineers) this past summer, but they were unable to offer any of them a job because there aren't any openings. I mean, I do think there are more teachers than engineers looking for jobs, but I think there is a big surplus of almost every job right now.
     
  18. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    Nov 5, 2009

    Well that may be true at this particular time in this economy, but overall, there is a glut of teachers, particularly elementary teachers. Look at all of those on this board who every year are looking for a job. I think this has been a trend for a very long time. How many of us were told if you go into teaching there will be lots of job opportunities. (I even switched majors because I thought finding a teaching job would be much easier then the major I had been in.) I haven't seen it and I don't know many who have, yet every year look at ALL of those who graduate with a degree in education. Unless you are specialized (math, science) or willing to teach in an inner city school, the market is over-saturated with teachers looking for work. There are far too many teachers (elementary, especially) for jobs available. I don't see that changing anytime soon. Why would salaries increase dramatically if there are so many willing and AVAILABLE to fill these positions??
    My brother is a mechanical engineer and has never had a problem finding a job. My sister is a nurse and she has her pick of job opportunities right now. I don't think I'll be able to say the same for my daughter when she graduates in May, although I'm hoping having her license to teach science may help.
     

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