Am I being taken advantage of?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by AZSpedtchr, Mar 3, 2008.

  1. AZSpedtchr

    AZSpedtchr Rookie

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    Mar 3, 2008

    I have just come home from an 11 hour day, and am feeling like I am being taken advantage of as a sped teacher. Today, we had an initial evaluation to present. It was scheduled for 3:30pm, but the parent did not show until 4:15. We had all already begun to pack up for the night, but we were told that we had to stay and follow through now that the parent was there. Yes, this saved me from re-doing the dates on the IEP, but it is still annoying and frustrating!

    After more than 10 years as a sped teacher, this is one of the days when I am SO ready to quit!
    So, I am wondering....is anyone else:
    1) going to (on average) 7 meetings a week and running half of them
    2) working 9-10 hour days regularly on campus(way outside of the 7 contracted hours I signed up for
    3) being asked to give up their prep time on a regular basis

    I feel like I wont be seen as a "team player" if I balk at this treatment. After all, I am not the only one at my school in this predicament. But the other people (SLP, School Psych, Principal) are being paid like $10K more than me!
    Any thoughts?? Thanks for your input!
     
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  3. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    I can't say much other than I know in the school where I sub, I hear similar complaints from SPED teachers. I think it goes with the territory these days.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Are you a member of a union? If so, it does sound like you are being taken advantage of. You shouldn't be asked to stay beyond the hours of your contract unless it's for a reason specifically outlined in your contract.

    Like for me--per our contracts, we don't have to stay beyond our regular 7 hours and 11 minute contracted day except on two dates chosen by the principal and for which he has given us explicit, advanced notice. Our principal usually picks Open House and Senior Awards Night as the two days when we have to stay for an extra couple of hours.

    If the principal or any member of the administration asks us to stay late (or implies that we should) any other time, that's a violation of our contracts and could result in us filing a legitimate grievance.

    Special ed teachers are required to do a lot of extra work, but they shouldn't be asked to work longer days than the general ed teacher--at least not if that's something that their contracts specifically prohibit.

    At my school special ed teachers do attend quite a large number of meetings, but all the meetings are held during the regular contracted day.

    Of course, special ed teachers always have the choice to stay late...but it should never be mandatory.
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I don't know. If a parent shows up, I always though the school wouldn't want to risk offending and prefer to have the teacher stay. Am I wrong where some of you are? Just curious.
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Here, the school would get into a lot of trouble if it asked teachers to stay beyond their contracted hours for any reason. A contract is a contract, and it means nothing if it's not enforced by both sides.

    Our school clears out by 2:45. Even the office staff aren't around after 2:30. So even if a parent did show up at 3:00, there would be no one around to permit a meeting to take place. In the event that a parent did show up at, say, 2:15 for an unannounced meeting, the parent would be told either 1) that the meeting will last until 2:41 when the teachers need to go home, or 2) that the parent should schedule the meeting for another day so that the teachers can be prepared (and that the meeting won't last beyond 2:41 anyway).

    Seriously, at the end of the day the admins need to be very careful about what goes on after 2:41. Occasionally we have staff meetings at the end of the day, and at 2:41 everyone gets up and leaves...even in the principal is in mid-sentence. If you want to stay, you certainly can, but the principal can't ask you to stay or reprimand you for not staying.
     
  7. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    As a special ed. teacher, I would usually only stay 30 minutes after a scheduled meeting due to a parent being late only if I know it would be a problem getting the parent to come back. If a parent is late, I really don't have a problem letting them know what time I have to leave and that I have no problem setting up a second meeting if we don't get finished. I also document that the parent was late and by how many minutes.

    I work with my therapists in trying to schedule meeting during school hours or at least 1 hour before the end of the school day (parents won't get in the parking lot if they come later otherwise it will have to start around 3:30 when the parking lot clears out). We decide ahead of time what the "important" points we would like to make, cues we could give each other to "stay on topic or to hurry up" and at what time we would try to end at. I usually let parents know ahead of time what time we hoped to finish the meeting but I try to make it sound like we were doing it for them -- so they can pick up their kids from daycare, so they could beat the bus home, so the kids won't be left alone at home too long...

    I run all the meetings except if it is one of the resource room teachers' students.

    Why do you have to give up your prep time? Would it really cause a problem if you said "no"?.

    When I worked in Georgia, I never got a prep and I also had to eat lunch with my students. I got a break by sending my parapro out with my students for recess. I gave her 3 ten minute breaks throughout the day in return. At my present job, I don't get a prep but I do get a sub one day a month so that I can have a prep day.

    What are you doing 9-10 hours on campus every day? Planning, prep, meetings...?
     
  8. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    I understand your points in your post - a contract is a contract, and both sides need to uphold that contract. Principals and teachers should absolutely do their best to finish at the appointed time but I couldn't help but notice one sentence that shocked me. (I highlighted it.) If my students got up when the bell rang if I was in MIDSENTENCE they could count on a serious lecture about manners. This kind of response from ADULTS? that's really disappointing. Let the person finish their thought, apologize for holding you over, and plan better next time. (Of course if the speaker is already way past the time, then sure, pple have places to go and you will see pple get up to leave. But I cannot imagine the whole room packing out at 2:41, as if they have been watching the clock for an hour.)
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Mar 4, 2008

    This isn't about being polite. It's about adhering to the terms of a negotiated contractual agreement between the teachers and the district.

    If you haven't ever participated in or heard about labor union negotiations, then you might not understand the amount of work that goes into them--on both sides. When both sides are able to reach a consensus, the contract is the result. The contract only works when both sides agree to abide by the terms.

    Just like I agree to show up on time, teach, be professional, etc., the admin agrees to make sure that teachers are done with their duties by 2:41. Our day ends at 2:41, and if the principal wants to keep us longer than that, he has to get our permission and pay us extra. For that reason, the principal almost never allows his sentence to extend past 2:41. And when he does, there's almost no one left in the room to hear it.

    You might think it's rude, and that's okay. I, on the other hand, strongly value my union and all the various supports that such a union offers me, chief among them the right to work a set number of hours. It's not rude for a teacher to remain assertive and remind an administrator about the terms of the teaching contract. It is rude for an administrator to violate the terms of that contract.

    I teach in a very large district (5th largest in the nation), and my school alone has around 150 teachers and three union reps. If the principal violates the terms of our contracts, someone will hear about it, grievances will be filed, and he won't be happy. He'd rather have a short meeting and be happy than have a long meeting and get fired.
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    And students are not under any sort of contractual agreement. It's not fair to compare them to teachers, who are.
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I, too, work long hours a couple of days a week and often work through recess and lunch. Most of it comes with the territory, but some is my choosing as I try not to bring much home with me. Almost all of the meetings I have with parents are outside of the time I am mandated to be at school because the only time they are able to come in is before they go to work or after they come home. Many are not in a position to be able to take time off from their jobs, and they may commute well over an hour. If I need to see a parent and the only time they are able to come in is at 7:00 am or at 5:30pm, I'll be there--it's important to me that I make myself as available as I can. I understand that I don't need to do this, and my administrator would never expect me to, but I know that it is appreciated, and is often repaid in subtle ways--an extra prep on occasion, a note that someone will cover my duty for me, a coffee in my mailbox in the morning.
     
  12. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Practice saying this.... "I have another appointment that can't be rescheduled. I'm not able to stay. You are welcome to hold the meeting without me (which they can't do legally) or we can reschedule." Say it as you are walking out the door.

    Don't apologize -- they are the one who should apologize for being late. You don't need to tell anyone what this appointment is -- you are supposed to be off the clock.

    The only time I'd stay is if it was just plain more convenient for me to stay than to do it another time.

    I used to let parents play this game of being late, and then keeping me late. Or keeping me late to meet with them, and then they wouldn't even show up! When I was a newbie, I did a lot of that. Not anymore.

    Fool you once -- shame on them.
    Fool you twice -- shame on you!

    Does your doctor sit around 30 minutes after his closing time waiting to see if you show up? Of course not. No one would expect him to.

    Does the DMV (Division of Motor Vehicles) stay open until 7pm, because you can't get they're when they are open? Of course not, no one would expect them to. When you need to go to the DMV, you find a way to get there during their hours.

    If you are supposed to be at court at 2pm, do you show up at 4pm and expect the judge to be happy with you? Nope. More than likely, he's already issued a bench warrant for you.

    Do you expect the pharmacist at the drug store that opens at 9 am to open just for you at 7am, because you can't get off of work? Nope.

    Leave THEIR problem with them.

    As for my administration noticing or appreciating that I would stay late -- for years I came early and stayed late to accommodate parents... nobody in administration ever notice or said thank you. THEY certainly never stayed until 5:30 or 6pm to meet with parents because it was inconvenient for them to get there earlier.

    My time is just that. And it is totally MY choice whether I give my time to anyone else.

    I spent years doing it, and then realized, people just take advantage. And I stopped letting them take advantage.
     
  13. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Our contracted hours are until 3:15. I am often at school until 5:00 or later and sometimes have to come on Saturdays.

    I have so much extra work to do compared to the regular ed teachers, and even other special ed teachers! Because I have a self-contained unit, with all the NCLB laws, I have to make lesson plans for every grade level that I serve! It's nuts.

    Anyhow, for THOSE reasons, I REFUSE to have ANY meeting PAST my contracted hours. If they schedule a meeting at 2:45, I always politely let whoever is running it know that I "have somewhere to be" at 3:30 and need to leave right at 3:15. Who cares if that somewhere to be is MY COUCH.

    I have one parent who likes to schedule the meetings after school because it is "free child care" for her. (The paraprofessionals watch her daughter until 3:15 when the hours are up.) The annoying thing with this is she always wants to "finish" but we explain we'll have to table the meeting due to contracted hours. We can't go any longer nor can we expect the paras (who are paid hourly) to continue to babysit her child.

    There are certain occassions where we are expected to be at the school (Literacy Night, Book Fair, Carnival, etc) and I don't mind doing that. However, like many have said, I think you should set your boundaries. What if you had another job? What if you had another job that you needed to go to directly after school? What if you needed this job to support your family because your teacher paycheck is not enough? They CANNOT require you to stay past contracted hours.

    I will say that I think it's pretty common for SPED teachers to lose their prep time. I almost NEVER have a conference period and usually don't have a lunch. I have one really aggressive, disruptive student who is brought back to my classroom if she "goes off" and I then lose my time to myself. We're allowed to leave campus for lunch and I have been doing this lately, just to save my sanity!
     
  14. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Exactly!
     
  15. AZSpedtchr

    AZSpedtchr Rookie

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    Wow, no one at my school would do that. Our principal is not a tyrant, but that would upset her. And if she went over by a couple of minutes, it wouldn't be a big deal. But we have our meetings in the morning; if people have to leave, it's because they have playground duty or the kids are arriving.

    Our principal is more like a martyr. She is always willing, perhaps eager, to be in the middle of everything. For example, on one of my other posts, I was asking for feedback on a Hearing Impaired/Autistic student who we're trying to get under control. Well, we (really SHE, the principal) decided to shorten his school day to 2 1/2 hours, from 10am-12:30pm. Because I cannot teach him when I have other students to work with, SHE decided that SHE would take on the task of teaching him for 1- 1 1/2 hours of that, and then asked (really TOLD) me and the SLP that we must work with this student on Fridays, when we have our prep/testing time/meeting time (since I have no prep any other day).

    It's just nuts, but I cannot figure out how to extricate myself without looking like a jerk. I already volunteer for almost nothing in the school since I have no extra time, and feel like I have no life outside work!
     
  16. AZSpedtchr

    AZSpedtchr Rookie

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    Contracted hours are 8:30-3:30pm for me, the same as reg ed teachers. BUT, IEPs/METs/BIPs are regularly scheduled for 8:00am or 3:30pm. So that's one reason I am at work for so long. The other reason is paperwork and prepping (unfortunately the last on my list!).

    How can anyone schedule a meeting during contracted hours??? I teach from 9:00am to noon and 1:00-3:00pm? I could almost never fit a meeting into a 30 minute slot! How do you do it?
     
  17. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Please allow me to clarify:
    OF COURSE the OP should not be expected to stay after hours for staff meetings (nor should any teacher, without their consent.)
    OF COURSE both sides of a contract have a responsibility to uphold their end of the contract.
    OF COURSE you have every right to say you have somewhere to be and cannot stay past school hours (I have, and do, uphold that right for myself - often)


    I do feel, however, that we are in a sad state if the speaker cannot finish his thought (10 seconds? 15?) for fear of having grievances filed and that other members of the meeting cannot allow him to finish his thought for fear that they will be taken advantage of if they do not leave midsentence.

    Maybe I'm crazy, but that would just eat at me. I'm glad it works for you though, Cassie. (I'm not being fasicious) Every school and district has their own culture, and helps their schools run the way they do.

    So, to the OP: Absolutely be assertive. Do not agree to set up meetings that are past your contractual hours, especially if a parent shows up 45 minutes late!! But maybe, instead of getting upto leave, we can give notice to the parents ahead of time (If there is time left: ) "As you can see, it is 45 min. past our meeting time. We have 15 minutes left to talk about the most urgent points and then we'll have to reschedule. I'm sure you understand." Or, "As you can see, it is 4:15 and our meeting was to start at 3:30. We'll need to reschedule our 45 min meeting, as we all have other appointments right now. I'm sure you understand."
     
  18. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    My parapro watches my class for me and the special ed. teachers took turns "lending out" our students who will need extra attention or lending a parapro to make it easier for meetings to happen during school hours. I try to start my meetings 45 minutes before school started so my parapro would only be alone for breakfast and morning work or I started them during my lunch hour or before the end of the school day.

    The admin. gets someone to watch the regular ed. teacher's class for a max. of 1 hours and I tell the parents a head of time that the teacher can only stay for 1 hour.

    I also tell working parents at least 1 month in advance of any meetings that will be coming up and I ask them for times and days when they can make it during the school day and I take these times and days to all who will be attending and we schedule a meeting from there.

    How many students do you have AZSpedtchr?
     
  19. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    We have a school substitute that works on the days we have Child Study/Special Ed meetings. She comes to your class while you go to the meeting.

    What I hate is when they schedule the meeting during my 23 minute lunch break. Sometimes, the meeting goes through my entire lunch break, and the sub has to go on to the class of the next teacher they are meeting with. I usually grab something to eat and eat it WHILE I'm trying to teach. Not fun!
     
  20. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    I'll rather meet during my lunch hour than after school. I tend to stutter when I am tired and I am tired after school:p. But...I have a parapro, so I will have her watch the class for 10 minutes while I eat or else I just eat during DEAR (Drop Everything And Read) time in the afternoon.
     
  21. AZSpedtchr

    AZSpedtchr Rookie

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    I don't have a parapro, and sometimes I need the SLP to come to the meeting if she is servicing that student. She has about the same schedule as me and so cannot cancel classes to have a meeting. Initial placement meetings take a LONG time and cannot be done during lunch since they are 1 hour plus.
    I am a resource teacher, the only sped teacher in my school, and I have 28 students. 4 are ED and have BIPs that we review regularly. I counted the meetings I have attended so far this year-- 86, with 60 being outside contracted hours. I would love to consolidate meetings, reduce their length, or find another time to do them!
     
  22. teacheratheart

    teacheratheart Companion

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    Those 3 things are my life. And my school psych and principal make close to double what I make. But #3 is my pet peeve. I have not had a prep hour all year. Finally the sped director, the counselor, and the principal put their foot down and gave me a prep hour. I actually have to lock my door to keep kids out. But now, I've got kids complaining!! And one of them happens to be the kid of someone from the DO. Now I am going to get a stipend for working my prep and I have to continue working it (but the superintendant didn't really give me a choice). So I've had a prep hour for about 2 weeks so far this school year.
     
  23. AZSpedtchr

    AZSpedtchr Rookie

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    teacheratheart,
    Maybe part of it is an Arizona thing? I did not have to deal with a lot of this type of thing in the other 2 states I worked in. With Arizona being a weak state on education, a "right to work" state, and the unions generally being underutilized and weak, how can we as professional educators get what we need in order to help us be the best we can, and therefore help the kids be successful???
     
  24. rchlkay

    rchlkay Companion

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    It might be an Arizona thing but it's not limited to AZ. I'm in the Midwest, case manager for 24 students, do all the paperwork, attend and run all the meetings (which are scheduled for 3:15 or later), teach straight through 8:15-11:55, eat lunch from 11:55-12:25, actually have students waiting at the staff room door at this time, go straight back and work again straight through the afternoon 12:25-3:15. My prep time is actually at the same time as one of my supportive help sections so depending on the day and the amount of their work, I sometimes get a little work done. I too am the only special ed teacher in the building. I'm not tenured yet (1 more year) so I've tried not to complain too much. I'll sympathize with you but I have very little advice.
     
  25. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Mar 9, 2008

    AMEN! :2up:

    I would add...

    Is there a comp time policy? You know, since we are exempt, it is expected, but sheesh!

    Okay, I will stay until 5:30 today, but I will leave two hours early next Monday. Don't ask them, TELL them and follow thru! If they as much blink, go with what Rain says!
     
  26. AZSpedtchr

    AZSpedtchr Rookie

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    Mar 9, 2008

    No tenure here in Arizona! :down:
     
  27. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I never understood tenure anyways!

    except for the fact that my daughter's middle school band teacher has been in same school long enough to have taught all of his kids' parents! If he is still there, they will be grandparents now!

    I say everyone should have a fair and equal chance of messing up, and hoping to get hired back in Sept!

    yes, I am now ducking..and you find snowballs or rocks to throw at me!
     
  28. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Mar 13, 2008

    When the secondary teachers in my former middle school were TOLD to give up a prep or a lunch, or stay after school for any reason past 3:45, we filled out a time sheet and got paid our hourly rate for it.

    If we did it on our own accord, of course, we did it for freebies.

    A school that's out at 2:41? Holy scheisse. Oh wait, the elementary below us were out then. Upstairs, the secondary had students until 3:20.
     
  29. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    how are you mamacita...aren't you due soon???
     
  30. ITeachSDCkids

    ITeachSDCkids Rookie

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    Mar 15, 2008

    Overtime Hours

    Last year all the Spec Ed teachers at my school began to take on much more for IEP's as we went to an online system and teachers were made case managers. For three years I often stayed at IEP's until 5:00 at times as parents would sometimes go way over the alloted time or time was not scheduled well. Although everyone agreed at school it was a problem, it continued. This year at the years start, I kept track and submitted the OT hours. I also asked that more IEP's be scheduled in the morning (we have 2 on site full time subs) to avoid after school and after contracted hours time. For example a tri scheduled at 2:30, when we are off at 3:15 is just not ample time. We have another teacher in our department who is now doing the scheduling and that has helped a great deal. I think teachers put in enough of their personal time and if you work past contract hours you should submit a time sheet. I later found out several teachers at my school were already doing this-it just had never been discussd. Once in awhile is okay with me but when it gets up there to 5 to 10 hours OT, I submit.
     
  31. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I wish sometimes that I had an option, but not sure what that is. We don't have a building sub, and don't have the budget book supply teachers to cover meetings. During the school day, if I have a meeting, I must shut down my program, and my students suffer. While I can agree to meet with parents during recess or on my lunch break, I can't schedule meetings that include other teachers at these times (as per our contract, we can't be compelled to attend meetings at this time). We don't have common prep times in which to schedule meetings. By default, after school is the only option for me.
     
  32. ITeachSDCkids

    ITeachSDCkids Rookie

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    Hi Mrs. C!
    That is difficult. When you shut down where do your students go? Our meetings are scheduled when the general education teacher attending has prep, we only have one at an IEP (an elective teacher). Do you have a minimum day once a week when students get out early? If after school is the only time and other teachers stay to do that also-you still should all be paid for your time.Possibly another option is to have another teacher who is on prep agree to take your students for an hour and you could do the same for them. Another option is except for IEP's doing phone conferences and email-I have found much can be discussed that way and for parents who cannot easily leave their jobs it works well. Just some thoughts...
     
  33. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Our contracts clearly state that we are to work 7 hours and 20 minutes at school each day, and that during a contract year we cannot be required to attend more than 30 hours of work after hours (such as open house, math night, music programs, pta dances, etc.) They also state that we aRe to get 225 minutes of prep time per week, and two of our 45 minute preps are reserved for training and team meetings. The rest is ours to use as we see fit.

    If you are spending more than that time, you are letting them take advantage of you. If scheduling is a problem, then the school, not you, needs to come up with a viable solution.

    I'm a firm believer in leaving problems where they belong. Poor scheduling is not my problem. Lack of subs is not my problem. IEPs not being updated is not my problem. If they want me to be there, they need to figure out a solution. I'm paid to be a teacher, not to figure out scheduling problems. It is up to administrators to determine how to make the school run efficiently.

    Don't get me wrong, I work a ton on my own, and willingly do many things for my school on my own time. I just resent being DICTATED to or forced into a situation where I must do things I"m not required to do, especially when my whole class suffers.

    One special ed teacher is notorious for planning meetings during my 15 minutes prep time before school. I use every second of that time to get ready (I also come in an hour and a half early to make sure I'm ready.) These meetings always go over, which leaves my kids sitting in the hall waiting for me. They lose 30 to 45 minutes of instructional time, and some other teacher haS to stand in her doorway to "watch" them. They get a late start on the day, and my whole day is off.

    I let it happen twice. Now, I just say "No!" I get up and leave when it is time for me to be in my class. I smile nicely and say "I have to get to my class. Do you need me to sign anything before I leave?" If she continues to go on with the meeting (which she does) I just walk out. She can chase me down later to get me to sign things.

    If they get away with it once, shame on them. Twice, then shame on you for letting it happen.
     
  34. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Mar 16, 2008

    If I need to shut down my program, the students stay in their homeroom classes (they come to me for math, reading and writing) completing work that I provide for them. All of our school days are full days for students. Overtime pay isn't an option.

    That said, I don't feel that I am being taken advantage of; I am doing my job. Part of that job involves meeitng with parents, teachers, psychologists, consultants and other professionals. I can't always expect everyone to fit into my schedule, sometimes I need to adapt to theirs. I have found that when I show some flexibility, others are willing to be flexible as well. Most days, I am free to leave whenever I am ready; sometimes I need to work late. For me, it's all part what I need to do to provide the best for my students.
     
  35. Kate Change

    Kate Change Companion

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    Mar 18, 2008

    One thing to keep in mind, there is a VERY significant difference in pay and treatment towards teachers in Canada and the US.

    I've lived for extended periods in both countries and teaching is hard work in both, but the level of respect and pay in Canada is much higher than in the parts of the US I've lived in. It's just something to keep in mind, that while down here many of us are making 28-30k per year and being told that we are only teachers because we couldn't get into grad school. And teacher's unions in Canada have a power absolutely unheard of where I live. I know a number of teachers who have second jobs. Because they have to. I'm not trying to minimize your experiences and hard work at all, it's just that the treatment and level of respect is so different.... I feel like a lot of this is about that.
     
  36. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Thanks for this--I am made aware of the vast differences in our systems every day as I read the posts here--just needed another nudge. I am sincerely sorry if I caused any offense in my posts; I only speak from my experience.
     
  37. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    I really think it depends on the state that you work in. I got so many more school supplies/resources in the states than I do in Canada. More special ed. inservices were offered when I worked in the states. There was more mandatory inservices that the school had no choice but to let me go to in the states. I was able to have meetings during the school day in the states and the states offered me the school sub (we don't have those in Canada). I find "respect" the same in both countries and there is a big difference in money between the countries (especially if you don't have your masters in the states). Personally, i would take teaching spec. ed. in the states over teaching it here, even if I were paid a lot less.
     
  38. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I have sensed this...
    As an example (and my school/board are typical). This year we have3 Special Ed teachers in my school of almost 750 students--I am the only one who does Special Ed full-time; the other 2 have other responsibilities. We have one half-time ESL teacher. Our psychologist is at our school half a day a week for testing and meetings. Speech and language pathologists behaviour specialists, and occupational therapists can be called in to consult. If a student needs their services, they may see them once a week. My case load of Special Ed students was 29 last year--this year it started lower, but is creeping back up there. I'm not complaining, it is what it is, but we don't seem to have the same full-time, in-school services available.
     
  39. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Mar 20, 2008

    MrsC, my program has about 10 spec. ed. classes (in a segregated school) but mine is the only one off site in a regular ed. school. I was given no educational resources other than a 5 books the teacher before me bought and decided that she did not need anymore. My class has "no budget". I am expected to get in my car and drive to the segregated school on my own time and look through the school 'resource' library, of course most of the books are in the teacher's classrooms who teach on-site. I really feel that working in the USA has ruined it for me; over there I was allowed to get anything that the regular ed. teachers in my grade level had, plus a $500 yearly classroom budget. I also liked the fact that in the states that there was certain classroom furniture that each class 'had' to have -- over here, I get what I get...
     

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