Am I asking too much?????

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by harbodin, Sep 10, 2009.

  1. harbodin

    harbodin Companion

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    Sep 10, 2009

    We finished reading Matilda, and have already completed on "big" writing assignment. We went over the steps in the writing process and how to organize our writing. We talked about intro, details, and conclusion. So when I ask my students to think about what happens "next" in Matilda, they are LOST. Am I asking too much to have them come up with a page about what happens to one of the characters after the book is over? They did a brainstorm prewrite with the 5W and How, but they don't seem to get that they should be creative and come up with their own ideas. They keep asking me what happens next, or telling me they don't know. This is my first year with 5th, but I really figured this wasn't too terribly difficult! Thoughts?!?!?!
     
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  3. Lionteacher

    Lionteacher Companion

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    Sep 10, 2009

    In years past for me it wouldn't have been hard. However my group this year we are building up to that sort of thing. I would talk to fourth to find out about how much creative writing they did because if they haven't done a lot it could be difficult for them.
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Sep 10, 2009

    They may not get the connection between cause and effect. Though you went over the main story events, you could discuss more how one event led to the next. You could also ask, "If you were the main character, what would you do next?"
     
  5. knitter63

    knitter63 Groupie

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    Sep 12, 2009

    Keep in mind, too, that they are just beginning 5th grade, so in my opinion, they are still 4th graders for a while. The 4th grade teachers may not have done much of this type of cause/effect (which is a big part of our 5th grade curriculum) I have also noticed that with my students, they have such a hard time just beginning any type of writing assignment. It usually takes much prompting on my part-many examples, many discussions and lots of listening to their ideas.
     
  6. hoku625

    hoku625 Rookie

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    Sep 12, 2009

    I'm finding that they don't know how to do this because so much is already handed to them. In my reading group yesterday the students all said they like to read series books because then they know what happens next.

    We talked about using imagination and predicting what will happen next but they didn't really know what to do. They kept asking, "but what if that's not what happens?" They couldn't get the concept that it's a story, the author is using his/her imagination to write the story. As we talked, I realized that children are spoon fed with series movies, television shows, and books that they just wait for the next in the series to have their questions answered.
     

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