Alternative Pathway to Licensure

Discussion in 'General Education' started by dream2bateach, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. dream2bateach

    dream2bateach Rookie

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    Dec 20, 2011

    Hi All,

    After getting laid off from my job about a year and a half ago, I went back to school full-time in August of 2010 to work towards obtaining a special education degree. I just completed fall semester and am on holiday break now. I have 9 more classes to complete, plus one semester of student teaching. So, I basically have 3 semesters left. My anticipated graduation date is May of 2013. Anyways, I live in Ohio and happened upon the alternative pathway to certification program that Ohio offers to people who already have a Bachelor's degree and would like to go into teaching. Let's just say this program is very tempting to me right now because I am getting sick of school and it just stinks that I still have over a year left of schooling before getting my degree. I think I've taken enough education classes to where I should qualify that requirement. I already have one Bachelors degree, so that won't be a problem. The only thing I would have to do is take the Praxis II test. So, in other words, I think I'm close to qualifying for this alternative licensure program. However, I'm still torn on whether or not I'd be better off just staying in school and completing my degree or going the alternative route. But, I do have some questions about this program.

    --I'd like to move away from Ohio after getting my teaching license. Do other states honor alternative teaching licenses? Has anybody had any experience with getting a teaching job in another state with an alt. license from a different state?

    --Do public schools look down on people with alternative licenses or do they hire them just the same as people with traditional education degrees?

    --What do you all think? Would I be better off going the alternative licensing route or just staying in school and completing my teaching degree? I'm 31 years-old. I've already done the college thing once. I just want to get out there and teach.

    Thanks in advance to everybody for your feedback. This really helps me in deciding which way to go.

    Brandon
     
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  3. rhoyalt06

    rhoyalt06 Rookie

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    Dec 20, 2011

    In the end they both lead to the same path. You end up with the same license. I do not think that alternative certification is frowned upon. Many people go that route. I am currently enrolled in an alternative program that will also lead to a Master's degree. You should really check out the alternative program and see if that would be a better fit for you. It's really all about what works well for you.
     
  4. dream2bateach

    dream2bateach Rookie

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    Dec 20, 2011

    Rhoyalt06,

    When you get your license, do you know if it will transfer to other states?

    Thanks, Brandon
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Dec 20, 2011

    I think that a traditional license would be better.
     
  6. dream2bateach

    dream2bateach Rookie

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    Why do you think a traditional license is better Caesar? I'm not questioning if you are right or wrong, I'm just seeing what you're reasoning is. I'm trying to weigh the pros and cons of traditional and alternative licenses. Thanks
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Based purely on my own observations and experience, ARL teachers seem to be much less effective than teachers with traditional teacher training. At my school you can spot the ARL teachers from a mile away because they're the ones with no classroom control, no idea how to teach their standards, a million referrals, and huge proficiency failure rates. I know that not every ARL teacher is like this. At my school, however, it's true based on what I've seen.

    I don't think that ARL teacher ineffectiveness is based on a lack of competence or motivation or passion. Instead, I think it's based on a lack of knowledge and training. Without explicit training on how to work with certain student populations (special ed, ELL, low SES, etc.), they seem to really flounder. The same goes for training on how to write an effective lesson, how to collaborate with colleagues, how to assess students, and how to use given resources. ARL teachers have to learn all those things on their own, usually by trial and error (mostly error....).

    If you have the opportunity to go through a traditional licensure program, I think you should do it.
     
  8. dream2bateach

    dream2bateach Rookie

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    Thanks Caesar!! I appreciate your feedback. I've actually taken a lot of classes so far that revolved around classroom management, team teaching, behavior interventions, etc. So, I feel like I have a pretty good foundation in those areas. Where I still feel a little weak is in lesson plans. I have taken a few classes where we were required to create lesson plans, but I don't feel like I've done it enough to be comfortable with it.

    I understand where you're coming from recommending that I continue with the traditional program. And after this upcoming semester is over in May, I'll only have 4 or 5 classes left and then 1 semester of student teaching. I know I'm close, but it's just so tempting to get the alternative license so I can get teaching, you know?
     
  9. Mrs.DLC

    Mrs.DLC Comrade

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    Dec 20, 2011

    dream,
    My daughter is teaching and went the alternative route. She's wonderful-according to evals and staff where she teaches. One of my principals said she didn't see a big difference in the way her staff performed based on how they obtained certification.(elementary level) Many traditional teachers also have poor management, etc. Some colleges only used to require 1 class for teaching exceptional children ,which doesn't always help too much. Some have no classroom management classes either.(In my experience) Often, a mentor teacher is very helpful when one starts teaching. Good luck with whatever path you choose.
     
  10. dream2bateach

    dream2bateach Rookie

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    Thanks, Mrs. DLC!! Do you know if your daughters' license transfers to other states? I'm trying to figure this out because once I get my license, I'd like to possibly move out of state. But if I go the alternative route and other states won't honor this license, then I'd rather not go that route.
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 20, 2011

    Each state has its own licensing requirements. You'll need to go the website for the state to which you're thinking of moving to see what requirements it has; there are no blanket rules.
     
  12. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    ARL is different in every state. At the University of Utah ARL for Special Education is a 2 year course for those that already have a bachelor degree, when you complete you have a masters in education and a standard license (after Praxis)

    At Utah State University (with a bachelor degree) it's 1 1/2 years to complete and you end up (after praxis) with a standard license but not a masters. (26 credits with 12 of those being able to be used towards your masters in education at Utah State)

    In Florida its no college credit courses (and no student teaching other then 1 or 2 times) and then taking state tests.

    All ARL classes are not the same. But the biggest thing I've personally seen is the requirements to transfer a license to another state. It's much easier to obtain a different state license if you've taught for 3 years. Otherwise you may have to take state testing or a few classes.
     
  13. Mrs.DLC

    Mrs.DLC Comrade

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    Dec 20, 2011

    dream,
    I don't know about transferring to other states.(She's in FL) She had a 3 year temp. and then got the regular after taking classes.I think it was 4-I can't remember.She also had to take ESOL classes for endorsement.(as did I when I moved here) It may be different now. Many states do have reciprocity, as others said ,you'll need to check. It can be confusing!!
     

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