Alternative Certification Programs: Catch 22?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by USFKate, Jun 12, 2007.

  1. USFKate

    USFKate New Member

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    Jun 12, 2007

    With all the talk of teacher shortages, who knew it would be so difficult to become a molder of young minds? My college advisors seem to have steered me wrong, and I feel as though I may have made a very big mistake by not majoring in education.
    When I graduate in December, with my BA in creative writing, I will take my teacher certification test and then I am going to have to find a job (obviously). Yet I have no training in the field of teaching, so I have been looking into Alternative Teaching Certification Programs, which offer many perks such as mentor programs and classroom experience. In the cruelest catch 22 I have heard, however, in order to participate in these programs one must already be an employee of a school district. How is someone with no training or experience in this field expected to land a job, let alone walk into a classroom and be able to perform and educate?! I have been devouring every instructional manual I can find that is geared toward novice teachers, but most of them assume the reader is an education major with at least some student teacher experience. To anyone with advise: Help!
     
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  3. Lyquidphyre

    Lyquidphyre Comrade

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    Jun 12, 2007

    It is a catch 22! They won't hire you because you have no classroom experience (student teaching) but you can't get classroom experience until they hire you.

    Find out if your college offers a Post Bacholorete (sp?) program in the education department. That is what I am currently doing and it is slightly different than alternative ceritifcation. Basically you do graduate studies at a college than just a program somewhere. You learn the major concepts it takes to be a teacher such as classroom management, literacy, multicultural curriculum and that sort of thing which is on the "education major" side of things.
    If anything start substitute teaching, it really looks good on a resume.
     
  4. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    Jun 12, 2007

    My degree is in history, and I got certified through an alternative program. My situation is a little different, however, because I was a para at the school where I have been teaching now for three years. I did not have to go through the whole rigorous interview process. Many of the people who went through the same program with me simply went to job fairs, and told the principals that they were enrolling in a alternative program. They were treated just as any education grad. They were interviewed, and then hired. I don't know how it is in Florida though.
     
  5. gumbita

    gumbita Rookie

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    Jun 12, 2007

    I guess perhaps it must be different in Florida because I am coming from the workforce, did the alternative cert program, and was hired. If Florida really does want to see that experience, could you maybe substitute teach to get that experience? Sorry about your situation - I am always amazed as well how there is always apparently a great demand for teachers, yet they provide barriers to entry in every way imaginable (I had my own ridiculous barriers to contend with, but I guess if you want it bad enough, it ends up working out...) Talk to the people in charge of your cert program too. They may have some advice on options.
     
  6. kinderteacher1

    kinderteacher1 Rookie

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    Jun 12, 2007

    It depends on where you live. I graduated from USF in Tampa also with a bachelors in social sciences and I was hired after my first interview! In Hillsborough county there is such a shortage of teachers that they do hire ACP teachers. I know several teachers that were hired that way all the way from kindergarten through 12th. Just make sure you put ANY experience you have with children in your resume and have a good cover letter (I actually didn't even have a cover letter). Then, during interviews make sure they know you are very willing and even eager to go to ANY trainings over the summer before school starts or anytime in that manner. If you have an upbeat attitude you'll be fine in this district :) Also, I walked into all the schools personally and handed in my resumes and I think that made a big difference. Of course when I dropped them off I was dressed in a suit and ready for an impromptu interview if I needed to be :)
     
  7. USFKate

    USFKate New Member

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    Jun 30, 2007

    thanks...

    Thank you for your replies..and I am also a student at USF! (Isn't that weird?:wow: I know this county is desperate for teachers and I could probably get a job here, but yet another one of my problems is I want out of Tampa!!! I've spent my college career here and can't wait to get out. I guess maybe I should just bite the bullet and stay here for a little while longer for the experience...I'm just scared of what kind of school I'll end up in! Thanks for the input!
     
  8. GatorGal

    GatorGal Cohort

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    Jun 30, 2007

    Also, find out if summer school is still going on and sign up to volunteer. This is something you can add to your resume!
     
  9. deserttrumpet

    deserttrumpet Comrade

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    Jun 30, 2007

    Find a rural school district with little money. Odds are higher that they wil higher you and allow you to go through an alt. program.

    There are some nice community college programs that will certify you. A lot of them are even going to virtual classroom observations instead of in class work (either a blessing or a curse depending on how you look at it).

    You can sub for a large district and try to get a long term position while you are becoming certified. You get a lot of experience and it will look good when you go to interview.
     
  10. Irissa

    Irissa Cohort

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    Jun 30, 2007

    Fl. Has a shortage of teachers. So Alt. Certs can get hired relatively easily. Always have been able to. If your interviewing before you take the test bring a copy of your transcript with you to the county they can do the work up to show you meet the requirements to teach. THe fact is in FL you don't HAVE to have education coursework to start teaching you must complete it within 3 years. I encourage you to go see a USF Education advisor they can help you look at your transcripts to see what you might still need. YOu don't have to stay in Tampa just look around the state. Once you teach for a few years most any state will take your certificate if you want to go elsewhere than FL.
     

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