Alternative Certifcation

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by ryhoyarbie, Mar 20, 2009.

  1. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Mar 22, 2009

    I didn't know about having to certify that they didn't have any acceptable certified teachers in order to hire an AC teacher.

    I was hired in TX, and never heard of such a thing. Is that every district in TX, or just some? My ACP had "partner" districts in which they had special job fairs just for ACP applicants, etc.

    Now I'm curious. My program never mentioned anything like that... If anyone has more info on that, I'd just like to be more informed about it.
     
  2. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Okay, I just looked some stuff up. Are the other TX teachers here provided with a probationary certificate prior to their first year of teaching? Maybe that's the difference. My program gave all of the candidates a probationary certificate which was valid for one year. Upon completion of a successful school year and recommendation from the principal (combined with content seminars, lectures, and other evaluations) - a standard certificate was awarded.

    Maybe districts who hire teachers without any type of certificate are expected to tell the state that they had no other candidates available (with a certificate).

    Could this be the case? Or am I way off?
     
  3. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Mar 22, 2009

    yes the probationary cert is like emergency permit - AC came around because high need areas of teaching. Districts need such and such teacher for which none were certified. So, the state allowed them probationary certs as long as these noncert people went through an approved ACP.

    This all has to do with NCLB and having 100% teacher highly qualified (which Texas was on the bandwagon long before the rest of the country).

    ACP's were a way for degreed people to enter teaching field without going all the way back through college (because who would do that). ACP's were started when there were teacher shortages - we just don't have alot anymore because tons of ACP's kept popping up churning out candidates. The only areas Texas (at least DFW) has shortages in bilingual, math, science, spec ed). If you are going into one of those areas you have a chance of getting in through ACP. But if your just gen ed elementary - you are going to have to work much harder to find a school that doesn't have qualified candidates (I talking on paper of course).

    On TEA website you can look up the last several years for each district in Texas. It will show the percentage of staff "highly qualified according to NCLB". Most districts went from 85-90% 5 years ago to nearly all districts being 100% now. This is because of NCLB. If you are an AC teacher (noncertified or probationary) you are not considered "highly qualified" Now those of prob certs, when you finish your year, you become "highly qualified" the same as if you went through a regular route to teaching.

    Confusing, huh????? Well, that is what happens when the federal government gets involved.:lol::lol:
     
  4. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Those partner district are just district that need AC teachers because they can't fill their high need areas with cert teachers. They do have to let the state know - becuase it is required by NCLB. If you work for a year successfully, you become a full-fledged teacher - and there is no longer any difference between you and a teacher that went through the normal way.

    I became a teacher through an ACP (A&M-Commerce). I didn't do the year with a probationary cert because I did student teaching. When I was done with my student teaching, I became a full-fledged teacher. So, I didn't have to find a district that need a non-certified teacher. I wa cert by the time I began teaching. But by best friend went through same ACP and she worked while taking classes. That first year she wasn't cert, but after that year she became full-fledged. But it was easier to get in through ACP back then. That was 2004.
     
  5. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Mar 22, 2009

    I had a basically and eligible for hire permit for lack of a better word. I took this to interviews and job fairs. After I was hired, I was able to apply for my certificate. It is a probationary certificate. After completion of the success year of internship with a regular teacher contract, my certificate becomes a regular one.

    If I would have gone with a program like the community college or TAMU or A&M Commerce, I would have had student teacher and a clear certificate.

    I wasn't knocking ACP's, I was knocking the rep they have with districts.
     
  6. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Well that explains a lot.
     
  7. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Where did you hear this? It is not true.
     
  8. mego65

    mego65 Comrade

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    Mar 22, 2009

    It may depend on the district. I haven't even been able to apply to some jobs with out being considered highly qualified.
     
  9. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    This is true. All schools have to send documentation in regarding their staff. Part of that documentation details which teachers are "highly qualified" and which are not. In fact this is public info. We send this info out each year to parents -it's a part of the "school report card".
     
  10. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    I was uninvited to two district job fairs last year because I was an ACP candidate.
     
  11. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Mar 22, 2009

    I am referring to this post:

    Originally Posted by jeanniemleigh
    And I know in Texas it is (not impossible), but at least in Texas the district must certify that the didn't have any acceptable certified teachers in order to hire an AC teacher.


    In all districts? I am alt cert and I know that several "regular" teachers applied for the position I ultimately got. From what source did you get this info?
     
  12. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Mar 22, 2009

    http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/nclb/hq.guidance.070705.web.pdf

    It is possible they would have hired you several years ago (if that is when you were hired) because each year the standard is raised to have 100% highly qualified.

    Also, you are in high need area bilingual). I specifically said I was referring to gen ed elementary.

    And, if you are not highly qualified - again I use that term as specified by NCLB, I know many good teachers aren't yet cert and many cert teachers are not good, - the school is required by law to send out a letter explaning that to parents.
     
  13. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Sorry, I missed the post that said gen ed.

    I was hired last year -- this is my first year teaching.

    Thanks for the link!
     
  14. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    I am sorry but I am correct. I have no reason to waste my time telling fellow teachers something that is not true. I was trying to help.

    Here are some excerpts:

    Plan for Teacher Quality (Highly Qualified Plans): All States that receive Title I, Part A funds are
    required to develop a plan to have all teachers of core academic subjects highly qualified no later
    than the end of the 2005-2006 school year,

    EACH LEA AND CAMPUS MUST HAVE A RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION PLAN THAT DESCRIBES STRATEGIES
    TO—
    • INCREASE PERCENTAGE OF HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS ON EACH CAMPUS TO MEET 100% BY END OF
    2005-06, OR LATER IF APPLICABLE EXCEPTION
    Division of NCLB Program Coordination 2 Texas Education Agency
    • ENSURE LOW-INCOME STUDENTS AND MINORITY STUDENTS ARE NOT TAUGHT AT HIGHER RATES THAN
    OTHER STUDENT GROUPS BY TEACHERS WHO ARE NOT HQ
    • ATTRACT AND RETAIN HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS
    • ASSIST TEACHERS NOT CURRENTLY HIGHLY QUALIFIED TO MEET THE HIGHLY QUALIFIED REQUIREMENTS
    IN A TIMELY MANNER

    The
    Agency has been informed that teachers using any of the following teaching permits in lieu of state
    certification are not in compliance with the definition of “highly qualified.” (Exceptions are noted
    below, as applicable.)
    • A teaching waiver approved by the Commissioner of Education;
    • A School District Teaching Permit approved by the Commissioner of Education;
    • Emergency Permits issued by SBEC to uncertified individuals (subject, grade-level, or both) for
    assignments in the core academic subject areas.

    Parent Notification Requirement: Any campus that receives Title I, Part A funds must provide to
    each individual parent timely notice in the event that the parent’s child has been assigned, or has
    been taught for four or more consecutive weeks by a teacher who is not “highly qualified.”
     
  15. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Mar 22, 2009

    And in its entirety:

    When can a teacher (intern) in an alternative route to certification/ACP program be considered “highly qualified”?

    Teachers in ACP programs may be considered to be highly qualified during the internship year if the teacher meets the following three requirements.
    a. Teachers, including special education teachers in ACP programs, who are not yet fully certified may be considered to meet the certification requirements in the NCLB definition of a highly qualified teacher if they are participating in an SBEC-approved alternative route to certification program under which they:
    (1) receive, BEFORE AND WHILE TEACHING, high-quality professional development that is sustained, intensive, and classroom-focused in order to have a positive and lasting
    impact on classroom instruction before and while teaching;
    (2) participate in a program of intensive supervision that consists of structured guidance and regular ongoing support for teachers, or a teacher mentoring program;
    (3) assume functions as a teacher only for a specified period of time not to exceed three years; and
    (4) demonstrate satisfactory progress toward full certification as prescribed by state statute.
    b. Holds a minimum of a bachelor’s degree; and Division of NCLB Program Coordination 2 0 Texas Education Agency
    c. Has demonstrated subject matter competency in each of the academic subjects in which the teacher is assigned to teach, in a manner determined by TEA and in compliance with Section 9101(23) of ESEA.
    (1) For new elementary ACP interns, this would be demonstrated by passing a rigorous State test of subject knowledge and teaching skills in reading, writing, mathematics, and other areas of the basic elementary school curriculum (WHICH CONSISTS of
    passing a TExES certification exam or tests in reading, writing, mathematics, and other areas of the basic elementary school curriculum.)
    (2) For new secondary ACP interns, this would be either passing the appropriate TExES exam or having an academic major or graduate degree or the coursework equivalent to an undergraduate academic major [i.e., 24 semester hours, with 12 of the hours being upper-division (junior- or senior-level) courses] in the core academic subject areas in which they teach.

    LEAs must ensure, through the state’s certification process, that these provisions are met [Section 200.56 of the Title I regulations, December 2, 2002] within three years. IF THE TEACHER DOES NOT COMPLETE THE ALTERNATIVE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM WITHIN THE THREE YEAR PERIOD
    AND BECOME FULLY CERTIFIED, THE TEACHER IS NO LONGER CONSIDERED TO BE HIGHLY QUALIFIED.
     
  16. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Wow -- I apologized once, here is another apology. I am sorry. :(

    I certainly did not mean to offend you.
     
  17. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Missy, the school could have chosen you if they could document that you were better qualified for some reason - for example perhaps you spoke Spanish better. I don't know.
    But, it does look worse for the school for them to have someone that doesn't meet "highly qualified" standard. There must have been a reason that they willing to take that to hire you. That speaks good things about you.

    But you will find many districts that will not hire non-cert because it is like having a point on your liscense so to speak. It doesn't look good. But schools are so desperate for bilinguals that I could completely seeing them wanting you, non-cert or not.
     
  18. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    SO I am highly qualified now. It's just that I wasn't before I was hire I guess.
     
  19. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    your right - but many have not taken and passed the TEXES as required by c.YOu may have, but many have not until their year is nearly over.
     
  20. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Okay. I need to look at our latest school report card and see what is listed but I still think that report card represented last year, right?
     
  21. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    yes it would be for last year. Most districts in Texas are at 100% hq.
     
  22. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    Implementation: The LEA should always place the best-qualified teacher available in the
    classroom. In addition, each LEA must have a recruitment and retention plan that demonstrates
    that the LEA has strategies and a timeline for attracting and retaining “highly qualified” staff, with the
    ultimate goal being that all teachers in the core academic subjects will be “highly qualified” by the
    end of school year 2005-06.
     
  23. suzerich

    suzerich Companion

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    Mar 22, 2009

    I was highly qualified because of my coursework in history and have received a Certificate of Eligibility to complete an Internship. Once hired by a school district, the ACP will issue a probationary certificate. I've also passed the TEXES 4-8 Generalist and 8-12 History tests. I'm able to take Social Studies 8-12 too, but haven't mainly because it is paper-based. According to my program, I have to take the PPR test by the ime my first year of teaching is complete. The program has not released me to take this test yet. There was a big outcry last year about ACP's and their accountability (I think that's how its worded), in which they are now required to have 30 hours of observations completed before being hired for the 2009-2010 school year. Our program had already had 20 hours required, but anyone entering the program after January 1, 2009, has to complete 30 hours. We can use some of our hours virtually or a substitutes or aides, but they want us to have actual classroom hours for as much as possible. They continue with a year long mentoring webcam based conferences, as well as providing a mentor teacher and periodic observations by the program during the year. I've subbed about 10 times total. Its very difficult to arrange travel and my son's schedule for last minute calls. I haven't been able to work many times that they've called because I couldn't physically get there in time. I think it will be better when its an everyday job rather than a "when its convenient job".
     
  24. ryhoyarbie

    ryhoyarbie Comrade

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    Mar 22, 2009

    Well I have been reading everyone's posts since page 4, where I last left off.

    I actually past my generalist 4-8 exam and I'm considered highly qualified. Note, I haven't passed my ppr exam because I have to secure a teaching position before I can take the test and become fully certified.

    Like what others had said, I did do observations, 20 I believe, where I had to observe a master teacher. The people I observed had been doing their jobs for over 20 years, so it was easy for them.

    I also observed a teacher at a school I subbed for a few weeks ago and watched her for a few hours teacher her speech class about how to write a paper. (Pretty easy concept for us here though)

    I'll go ahead and do a few more observations at the school my mother works for and ask how they do their lesson plans and so forth.
     
  25. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    Mar 23, 2009

    You will appreciate doing observations more once you are in your own classroom. They will make more sense and you can target what you want to focus on.
     
  26. babycheeks

    babycheeks Rookie

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    Mar 23, 2009

    The Alternative program for me is 12 week clinical or one year placement. I only paid 195 for the courses program and then the test fee and then its 4000 for the placement. Obviously if you do the 12 week you pay the 4,000 yourself if you do the year placement it comes out your salary. but yeah we were given the choice.
     
  27. tb71

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    Ok--if I'm reading this corrrectly...since I am participating in a SBEC approved ACP that will continue during my first year of teaching, I have passed the EC-4 Generalist, and have a BS--then I can qualify as Highly Qualified? I've only seen the reference to Highly Qualified teachers on one school district website. Thanks in advance!
     
  28. kalli007

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    Yes, once you pass the content exam your are Highly Qualified for that area. If you take and pass another grade level and /or content you are HQ for that area as well.
     
  29. tb71

    tb71 Cohort

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    Thanks Kalli007!
     
  30. ryhoyarbie

    ryhoyarbie Comrade

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    From what I heard, the market, well at least for the DFW area, has too many EC-4 people. But that's what I read. But who knows.
     
  31. tb71

    tb71 Cohort

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    Ryhoarbie--I don't doubt that the market has a lot of EC-4 here as well, but I'm hoping that since we have so many new schools being built that I may get lucky. Just in case though, I will be testing for my 4-8 generalist in April.
     
  32. trigger

    trigger New Member

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    the last time I checked it out Region 11 did have a student teaching option.
     
  33. TechTeach09

    TechTeach09 Rookie

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    I think to land a job regardless if you did not major in education, be sure to know your stuff in your degree and take a content exam that matches that degree. I have a Management information systems degree, extensive computer technology experience, and therefore am Technology Applications certified.. I love it! Best decision I ever made. Districts love knowing that when the technology department is swamped a fellow teacher can help another teacher or administrator in PC Need!

    ACP works for me!
     
  34. Cranmans

    Cranmans Rookie

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    I think in Texas, from what several P's have told me that it all depends on your degree, what area of certification you have (including multiple and your willingness to sponsor a program). Of course, being bilingual, math/science, etc, is a major plus. A lot of school districts that I have talked with, majority are urban, told me that they will accept either student teaching route or the alternate route. If you can sub that is a plus, also getting your CDL license to drive a school bus would not hurt either.
     

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