Alternative certfication doomed?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by ryhoyarbie, May 11, 2009.

  1. ryhoyarbie

    ryhoyarbie Comrade

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    May 11, 2009

    For people like me who went through the alternative certification, I will be at the end of the hiring process where all the people who are fully certified will have either been interviewed and or got a job at a school.

    I forsee myself not getting a job this coming school year due to the fact I am not fully certified and have only taken and passed my content exam, but not my ppr. I have to secure a job before I can complete my certification from my program guidelines or if I don't get hired on, I can student teach for 12 weeks with no pay and also take my ppr exam during that time and become fuller certified. But of course that would lead me to continue to sub for the spring semester of 2010 and do the job hunt all over again.

    :spitwater::dizzy:
     
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  3. kalli007

    kalli007 Companion

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    May 12, 2009

    I'm an alt cert too - just finished the classes. Just keep plugging away, I just assume that I will be hired late - as in right before school starts! Even if I am not I will sub and let every single school know that I am alt cert and will take any position they have open.

    It will happen for you!
     
  4. KinderMissN

    KinderMissN Companion

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    May 12, 2009

    I know a lot of people are very wary of charter schools, but for alt cert candidates they can be a lifesaver. You can earn your full certification by teaching at any TEA approved school. Double check the school to make sure it is approved. At charter schools you may make less, but it is certainly worth it if it helps you get your full certificate!
     
  5. MATgrad

    MATgrad Groupie

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    May 12, 2009

    Remember that this is an employer's market. You are competing against not just fully certified but experienced people. It is tough for everyone. I have my masters, am fully certified and have experience. I have been looking for a year. It's very hard out there for job seekers right now.
     
  6. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    May 12, 2009

    Then do the student teaching. If teaching is the career for you, you'll make the sacrifice. I did and was hired right out of student teaching. besides, you learn alot doing the student teaching.

    As you always heard, good things are worth waiting for.:D
     
  7. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    May 12, 2009

    WE, :)"THE AC PEOPLE":cool: don't want to BE REMINDED ABOUT competing against y'all who are CERTIFIED & EXPERIENCED!
    We know that already!:D
    Rebel1
     
  8. Kate Change

    Kate Change Companion

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    May 13, 2009

    I went through the alt and had a similar issue. None of the schools/age groups/populations (special ed) I really wanted to work with were available. So I drove a long way to work and worked with a different age group and disability than I wanted. It turned out OK. I don't exactly come home singing love songs to my boss, but I've finished the required part of my program and once I pass the last tests, I'll have a lot more selection. Who knows, maybe I'll be comfortable enough to stay?

    I couldn't have afforded to take an unpaid student teaching position (a lot of us Alters are older than traditional college students and just can't), so I can understand why you'd want to avoid that, but my advice is, just go where you can. I've heard that charter schools can be rough, but once it's done, you'll have a lot more freedom. Good luck and take care. It might be a last minute thing, but as long as you are flexible and open to new things, you have a shot at it.
     
  9. engineerteacher

    engineerteacher Rookie

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    May 13, 2009

    I feel your pain ... I'm right there with you. I'm doing "alt cert" for math in CA, applying for jobs as an intern. Everyone keeps telling me that math is in high demand, but it's a little discouraging to know that you're always going to be last on the interview list in a job market like this. I just applied to my first job this week for a district that has 2 openings, so we'll see.

    I have three kids, and only the oldest will be in school in the fall. I was working out the numbers last night about how expensive it would be for day care for the younger 2 and tuition if I have to student teach and it made me cringe. :dizzy: Hopefully it won't come to that!
     
  10. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    May 13, 2009

    Some of us student taught even though we were older and had children. I think I learned more in that experience than the whole time I was in college.

    And in Ag (my husband's field) you have to student teach in our state over 50 miles from your home town. There are only certain schools that take them. I have seen many older men with children make the sacrifice because it is what they wanted to do. It can be done.
     
  11. TechTeach09

    TechTeach09 Rookie

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    May 13, 2009

    Heyyy, I am AC and on the same boat, but anyone can have more experience or certification but its you as you that shines, not just whats on paper.

    I keep praying every day for a position. I know how it feels when they look at experienced ones first.
     
  12. MATgrad

    MATgrad Groupie

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    May 13, 2009

    I think you took my post wrong. I was merely pointing out that this is an EMPLOYER'S market. They can be as choosy as they want and many times they want those that are done with certification. It usually results in less paperwork for them.

    I'm an older student that worked full-time while doing my certification and then went and did student teaching. I get a lot more respect from admins for it. I've been told it's the reason they interview me. I learned more from subbing than I did student teaching but it's the student teaching that is valued. JMHO.
     
  13. McKennaL

    McKennaL Groupie

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    May 13, 2009

    If the choice is ..

    a) don't get hired

    or

    b) take time without pay to student teach but then BE up and ready to be hired

    I don't see it as a choice. I am a career changer WITHIN education. Taught Music...now have my certificate to teach elementary Ed. I was told that the state wouldn't ALLOW me to student teach because i already had student taught in elementary and secondary with music and already taught too.

    But I KNEW there was NO WAY that I could get hired (anywhere in the suburbs-or in a decent district) if i didn't have the experience of AT LEAST student teaching. It was a fight-but they finally let me (well, let me, but I paid for it of course). I also worked a job for 35 hours a week...(see an answer from me in the student teacher area regarding working while student teaching). It's not exactly what i would recommend to ANYONE, but I am a single mom and if I didn't bring in SOME money I didn't have a spouse to count on to bring any in.

    In summary... I think there IS only one answer. Student teach. (But also know that...at least in MY state... you had to do a semester of clinical experience/observations before student teaching - so that's a whole year of work.)

    Not great news for you...but better than not having the prospect of being hired.
     
  14. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    May 13, 2009

    thank you - I couldn't have said it better. When i did it, I was 27 and had 5 kidsm (7, 5,4,2, and 10 months). I had just left my worthless husband. My mom helped me watch the kids while I went to school. I student taught to get it over with - and now I have 5 years under my belt. I couldn't have held out for a job as an AC. I had to take care of business and get it done.

    I began teaching at the school I student taught. This is the first year I have applied to other districts (I know great timing). I have received 2 offers (one of which is my district of choice). Plus, my school is super sad to see me go because I am a really respected teacher(a darn good one if I do say so myself). I say this as an example. After you get that cert. (no matter the route) you are on equal grounds with those that went the traditional route. But you sometimes just have to suck it up and take the hard way.

    After your cert. you'll be looking back and be thankful you just did it. There will be no more division between AC and traditional.
     
  15. english_bulldog

    english_bulldog Rookie

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    May 13, 2009

    I'm going through alternative certification as well, but I already have a job secured for the following year. However, I have also worked at that same school for the past year, so I knew the principal and had worked with the English department through various programs. So, they all knew I was a hard worker. At the time I was offered the position, I had only passed my PPR. I'm not taking my content until June 27(?) and my ESL as well. I honestly do not believe that I would have been offered the position had I not had previous work experience and come highly recommended by various employees at the school. Had I not had that work experience, I don't think I would have gotten the position.

    My advice? Go to job fairs. Send e-mails. Follow up with principals. Even checking out local universities might give you a heads up. I know that the career services can't help you if you're not a student, but at my university there were postings for teaching positions and job fairs all over the education department as well as in the career services center. I know it's tough, but hang in there! And remember - it's only the second week of May. A friend of mine signed her contract two weeks before the year started this past August.
     

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