Alert on Deadly Fad--Kids Are Ingesting Laundry Detergent

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Obadiah, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    843

    Jan 18, 2018

    Since January, emergency personnel have seen a record number of poisonings due to the latest fad of mostly teenagers (ages 13-19) eating laundry detergent pods while filming this for the Internet. (See story on CNN.com). This can cause serious injury and even be fatal. Detergent makers have been contacting social media networks to delete such posts in an effort to stop this fad.

    As I was thinking about this last night, I was wishing kids would start more constructive fads. A thought that came to my mind--I googled a census count of 41,731,233 kids ages 10-19 in the U.S. (2015). If only half of these kids deposited a dollar bill into a McDonald's House collection box at McDonalds, that would raise $20,865,616.50 for the McDonald's House.
     
  2.  
  3. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    6,037
    Likes Received:
    1,518

    Jan 18, 2018

    This is more proof that teenagers don't have good sense.

    I teach them, and I love them dearly . . . but they are a mess.
     
    nstructor and Obadiah like this.
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,070
    Likes Received:
    1,886

    Jan 18, 2018

    We're going to be having a discussion about this in my Grade 7 class this afternoon, starting with the headlines that Facebook and YouTube are (supposedly) going to be taking down these videos. I hope they will point out the stupidity of purposely ingesting poison.
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  5. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,564
    Likes Received:
    743

    Jan 18, 2018

    Obadiah likes this.
  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    1,304

    Jan 18, 2018

    This is natural selection at work...
     
  7. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    843

    Jan 19, 2018

    Teenagers are still growing, and their brains and bodies are experiencing quite a growth spurt. Add to that all that society expects of them, and top it off with the Internet and texting. I was thinking about all the crazy things we did when I was a teenager. Probably the worst was when some friends of mine were drinking and driving and almost died; my one friend barely made it to his graduation. Another friend of mine was messing around the railroad tracks on his bike and died from being hit by a train; I remember learning about it in school the next day. Other than that, and some friends experimenting with drugs, most of our craziness was harmless. My mom and I were discussing how when she was a teenager, the current fad was swallowing goldfish. Not much fun for the goldfish, but certainly less harmful than eating laundry detergent. Modern technology is wonderful and beneficial, even needed in today's huge world population, but it also has negative aspects; the pressures teens face today seem greater than when I was that age some 47 years ago. And for my mom, life was like an episode of The Waltons.

    I heartily agree, this needs to be discussed with teenagers, and even younger kids who might try to imitate older friends or even be coerced or tricked into trying the fad. In thinking about this, I also was reminded of what Lawrence Welk said in one of his autobiographies concerning any public criticism of his television program. He found that both positive and negative reactions resulted in advertisement and enhanced the amount of viewers to his program; it's like a paradox: kids need to be informed that this is dangerous, but at the same time, informing them is also advertising the fad. Back to the train track situation mentioned above, because where I live (and even more so as a kid) train tracks are everywhere, we would have lessons every year in school about staying off the tracks. Somehow, we figured it was good advice but it wouldn't happen to us. Yet having the lessons, I feel, is more important than not having such lessons. Back to the detergent fad, somehow we need to convey to kids that this isn't a joke, this isn't just an extra added precaution (like the list of precautions that come with any product you buy), this is serious, deadly serious--one trial could be too late. I'm kind of thinking aloud while I write, but I wonder if an examination of the specific chemicals that make up such products might be helpful. I can foresee even some rumors developing, supposedly safe ways to ingest detergent, (kind of the smoke but don't inhale the pot type of scenario), (or drink vegetable oil and the alcohol won't make you drunk). And the Internet is full of such trashy information that for kids, who are still learning to read critically, might believe.

    I don't know, perhaps I'm jumping to conclusions, perhaps I'm just being paranoid, and I hope I am, but this is looking to me like something that could catch fire and spread, even evolve to other dangerous stunts.
     
  8. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Messages:
    471
    Likes Received:
    318

    Jan 20, 2018

    Remember when kids were laying in the middle of darkened highways because they saw it in a movie (The Program)?

    I chalk this up to Darwinism and am at peace with it. I have to be, because this behavior will never end.
     
    GPC0321 likes this.
  9. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    843

    Jan 21, 2018

    Interesting article:

    Tim Cook: I keep my tween nephew away from social networks. CNET, read on Google news, news.google.com , under the heading Technology.
     
  10. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

    Joined:
    May 24, 2015
    Messages:
    245
    Likes Received:
    158

    Jan 27, 2018

    Some of my students were discussing this latest fad after their state test the other day, and this was my exact response. The kids said the stores had started removing the detergent pods from the shelves. That's part of the problem, in my opinion. Are we going to have to remove everything that human beings shouldn't eat from the shelves of stores because our children are too stupid not to eat it??

    What a world.
     
  11. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    843

    Jan 27, 2018

    Although microevolution, or adaptation, does occur in humans, I'm wondering if this behavior (of filming oneself eating a laundry pod) is more of a symptom deriving from age characteristics. Kids are still learning: for that matter, adults are still learning, too. But the understanding and brain processing level develops over time, and during childhood it seems certain precautions are warranted. Our society has extended childhood well into the teen years, but physiologically, the brain is still developing even past the teen years.

    We take time to teach younger children not to play with electrical outlets and we even put plastic plugs into unused outlets to discourage curious fingers and tongues. We teach younger children to not take medicines without parental approval and we also secure the medicines where they cannot reach them. Teenagers, especially younger teens, also need guidance and in some cases preventative measures. They are becoming more independent, but some activities still need physical restrictions. Society has legal ages for driving cars, drinking alcohol, and other such restrictions where most children's age would limit their ability to function responsibly or safely.

    Regarding the "Tide Pod Fad", (I understand from my church's youth pastor it now has a name), yes, it is stupid to eat laundry detergent, but kids do stupid things. Why? They are prone to experimentation, their brains are still developing an understanding of appropriate precaution, and probably most notoriously responsible is their strong drive for social acceptance. The drive for social acceptance is not a negative attribute; it is vital to survival, but unchecked, it can also be detrimental.

    Just as kids learn 2+2 and short/long vowels, teenagers need to learn which are proper and improper actions and activities. They will mess up at times. Just as a first grader might spell "frist gradr" or answer 2+2=3, teenagers also make mistakes. The problem is, their mistakes can be dangerous. That's why teenagers have older role models (adults: parents (especially) and teachers) to guide them.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 176 (members: 0, guests: 161, robots: 15)
test