Aide vs Substitute

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by bloodybeth, Nov 13, 2014.

  1. bloodybeth

    bloodybeth New Member

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    Nov 13, 2014

    Hi! I apologize in advance if this question has been answered already.
    I am currently enrolled in my last quarter as a Communicative Disorders BA however I do not want to continue into the field of speech pathology.
    I want to pursue a Masters and teaching credential in special education option: mild/moderate disabilities.

    I have been working as a middle school special education mild/mod aid for collab/rsp classes. I really enjoy it however the pay is okay and I only work 3 hours. I am going to be done with school in December and I do not plan on going immediately back to school due to financial reasons and my BA loan.

    And if it helps I also worked with adults with disabilities with their adaptive living skills, but I quit due to transportation issues. ( I had to have a car at all times)

    My question is should I continue being an aide with little hours or should I apply to become a substitute?
    Which would help me in the long way?
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2014
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  3. ktmiller222

    ktmiller222 Cohort

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    Nov 14, 2014

    It depends. Do you have your teaching certificate yet in Special Ed? It my state, you have to have your state teaching license in order to substitute. I sub now and I know there are a lot of half days posted for subs. Is there any way you can be an aid for the three hours and then you can sub the other half of the day if you are needed? I am assuming you are either working the 3 hrs in the morning or in the afternoon?
     
  4. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Nov 14, 2014

    I think it varies by location, so it's probably best to ask locally. I hope I'm not sounding rude by saying this, but in my experience subs simply just don't get noticed. I guarantee that our principal has no idea who any of our subs are, even if they are in the building somewhat frequently. I've also always been curious about how people get letters of rec from subbing, since they don't have a specific boss or team that they work with. On the other hand, if you work as a para you're part of the staff and everyone knows you. I feel like it's easy to go above and beyond in that type of position and get noticed, and you should be able to get lots of recommendation letters for when you apply to teaching positions. You could always look for a para position at a different school if your current one isn't giving you enough hours. My district is always desperately looking for good paras for sped, particularly in our mod/severe classes. The jobs are often posted for a long time before they can find someone they want to hire.
     
  5. Ms.Blank

    Ms.Blank Companion

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    Nov 15, 2014

    In California, you need a bachelor's degree and the CBEST passed. Then you can get fingerprinted and apply for your sub permit.

    In my district, as well as many districts around me (SoCal), subs definitely DO get noticed. The districts tell applicants during the hiring process that they are so careful during their sub hiring because they pull for regular classroom teachers directly from their sub pool (of course, you would need credentials for this to happen, but still...not a bad way to start). This is definitely a regional thing; I've read all over these forums that many other areas are not the same. I think California, or at least SoCal is unique in this aspect (Of course, I can't speak for ALL districts. But I have friends in many districts in my surrounding area, as well as contacts...I try to keep up with what's going on. These are the trends I've heard of).

    I know nothing about special ed, can't help you there, although I know it's a much different route than general ed. However, you may be able to pick up more sub jobs if you're willing to sub special ed, as it isn't as popular.

    As far as the "should you continue" question...are you asking if you should try to find another job similar to the one you just quit? I was going to suggest to try BOTH jobs...let's say you were at your old job with the 3 hours a week. You could always sub on the alternate days. Of course, this may get more tricky once you start your credential program...I think subbing is easier to do during a credential program, due to the fact that you can pretty much work when you want. Have a test this week? You don't have to work. Have a group project due soon and your group needs to get together? Don't work that day. Stuff like that :)
     
  6. bloodybeth

    bloodybeth New Member

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    Jan 22, 2015

    Thank you all for your responses! I am going to go with what waterfall said and stay. I asked my vice principal and she said there might be a 5 hour postion opening soon! :D I agree and thought about how close I am with all the staff and the students. :blush:
     
  7. ktmiller222

    ktmiller222 Cohort

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    Jan 22, 2015

    Good luck! I hope you get the job....or at least more hours! :cool:
     
  8. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jan 22, 2015

    Based on my experience, I would go with being a sub, and not an aide. I've seen that subs are more often looked at as want-to-be teachers, either already having a credential or are working on it, and aides are often looked at as people who have no desire to be teachers, they want to be aides.
    Also on resumes, I think subbing looks better, because that means you were routinely in charge of entire classrooms (on the daily basis), and made decisions, but as an aide, you were never really left alone with students, and your role was more to follow directions and not so much of being in charge.

    But this can be different regionally, so it's hard to say.
     

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