AHHH! HELP!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by runsw/scissors, Oct 31, 2008.

  1. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,482
    Likes Received:
    97

    Oct 31, 2008

    Boys and Books

    I need some advice. I am going to start tutoring a 5th grade boy next week in reading skills. He is currently reading at a low 2nd grade level and is in need of the most basic instruction (sound/letter recoginition) so that is where we will begin. I am working with him for an hour three times a week though and cannot focus on phonemes the entire time. I want to start using books in our sessions quickly-me read to him, practice inferring skills, some rudimentary reading on his part. The thing is, he is a very frustrated boy who wants to read but can't and therefore pretends and has tricked his parents into believing otherwise (I'm sure there was a good deal of denial present as well.) So here is my question: What are some easier picture books in terms of word/vocabulary difficulty that a 5th grade boy would be interested in? I'm thinking there should be a small amount of text on the pages at least for now. He wants to read so badly, but I think a text overload would frustrate him when he can't get past the first few sentences without problems. Also, I want him to be able to get through a book in a few sessions at most. We can move on to graphic novels and chapter books in a while.
     
  2.  
  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Nov 1, 2008

    I'm in over my head here.

    But when my son was smaller, he loved The Lot at the End of the Block by Kevin Lewis.

    It's almost like The House that Jack Built-- the story keeps building, and each page ends with "the lot at the end of the block." So he'll continue to see the same phrases over and over again.

    It's about construction, and I would imagine it's fairly easy to read.

    Is anyone else familiar with it? Would it be appropriate?
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,935
    Likes Received:
    679

    Nov 1, 2008

    My suggestion would be to have him read the early chapter books, but you read aloud a more grade-appropriate novel. He will benefit from both. I never had a 5th grader who didn't read. I did tutor a 3rd grader who didn't read for several years. We played many games with language - I just made them up.

    One good thing to do is to have him write in sand - phonemes, whatever you are studying. Get a cookie sheet and some sand - or even flour.
     
  5. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,482
    Likes Received:
    97

    Nov 1, 2008

    He is still covering parts of words with his thumbs (words such as 'listening' and 'capture') and trying to sound words out letter by letter. Of course each letter can only have one sound according to his understanding. We have a long way to go. I was trying to think of picture books that might have a lot of pictures he can use for inferring and prediction as well as clues about the text. Two Bad Ants comes to mind and maybe The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, but then I get stuck. Any other ideas out there?
     
  6. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,482
    Likes Received:
    97

    Nov 1, 2008

    Can you tell me more about these games? I'm not very creative about stuff like that.
     
  7. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,135
    Likes Received:
    507

    Nov 1, 2008

    runs,
    I'd start with some simple chapter books that have LOTS of pictures -- so he can feel like he is reading harder material, while still getting the picture clues he needs. I'd recommend the Henry and Mudge series to start with. Almost any library has them, and they are also available as paperbacks from Barnes and Nobles (don't forget your educator discount on them!) They are by Cynthia Rylant, and they are all on a 1.6 to 2.7 reading level.

    These books are wonderful for struggling readers. The words are simple, the pictures are helpful, and they are laid-out like chapter books.
     
  8. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,135
    Likes Received:
    507

    Nov 1, 2008

    Does he know his Dolch words? Have you tested him on the preprimer through 3rd grade lists? Then make flash cards for the words he doesn't know? This helps more than you can imagine. I start with preprimer, and mark the word a child can't say in 10 seconds (they should not be trying to sound them out..they need to look at them and instantly know them to be counted as correct.) I keep moving up the lists until he gets to a list where he misses 6 or more. Stop at this one. Make index cards of the words he missed and put them on a ring. Have his parents flash these to him all the time. As he learns them, you can take them off the ring.

    Then move to the next list. Keep going up until he can't get 6 of them. Stop, and work on those. You'd be surprised what a huge difference this can make.
     
  9. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,135
    Likes Received:
    507

    Nov 1, 2008

    You might try some of the things on A to Z Reading. Their phonics and phonological assessment tools are really wonderful. I realize this is a "pay" site, but they have some nice things.
     
  10. ruralneteach

    ruralneteach Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2005
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 1, 2008

    I would second the suggestion for the Henry and Mudge series; however, I would ask the child to practice a section until he feels he can read it fluently and then have him tape it for a primary classroom to use. He'll never know if they were actually used, but it would give him a purpose for reading without making him feel stupid for reading "kiddie picture books".

    I usually have them read a section a time or two and then tape it. Then they listen to themselves and invariably they feel like they could do a better job and will practice some more and try again. You can't beat repeated practice with a purpose.

    I've done this with some of my struggling readers in my multi-age room and the younger kids fight over who gets to listen to the taped books. They seem to like them because it's a kid reading them.
     
  11. forchange

    forchange Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 1, 2008

    Bone books are graphic novels that are at about a 3rd grade level. With some help, he could probably read them and my 7th graders still like them, which means he won't feel so embarrassed. The Time Warp Trio and Captain Underpants are also both kind of "cool," have pictures to help with comprehension, and at a low level.
     
  12. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7,075
    Likes Received:
    15

    Nov 1, 2008

    I will second the Captain Underpants books. I hate them, but the boys seem to love them. They are not 2nd grade (3rd grade if I am not mistaken), but being guided by you, he should do fine.
    And, it falls in the 4th grade range, but Diary of a Wimpy Kid is loved by boys (and girls), too!
     
  13. tgi1515

    tgi1515 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 2, 2008

    My own sons liked the Magic Treehouse books by Mary Pope Osborne. They were "chapter books" but short and 2.5 - 3.0 AR level.

    They also loved Goosebumps by R.L. Stine... I hated them, but they loved them and read.... so I didn't complain (too much). These books are 3rd grade reading level.

    Also, when I was tutoring 3rd graders (on 1st & 2nd grade levels) last year, I used www.theschoolbell.com web site. I printed gameboards and dolch word cards (click on the Dolch Kit). We rolled a die and they had to read that many words. Whatever they read right, they moved that many spaces forward. Eventually they always won... sometimes it took longer than others. There are other games listed that would be fun. When I taught 1st grade they liked to play "slap".
     
  14. oldfashioned

    oldfashioned Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 2, 2008

    Hmmmm, a 5th grader reading at a low 2nd grade level - wow; poor kid. Phonics work, sight word practice, and fluency practice using decodable books (phonics application) should make up the bulk of your lessons. Is there a learning problem that is keeping your student from reading at a higher level? At our school, students like your 5th grader have weekly progress monitoring fluency testing and intensive intervention using a supplemental reading intervention program like Phonics for Reading or Corrective Reading.

    As for early chapter books, I second the previous post about The Magic Tree House series. My students love The Magic Finger, by Roald Dahl (not a chapter book). The Bunnicula and Friends books are good early chapter books as are the Nate the Great books and Ready Freddie books. Good luck with your student!
     
  15. letsteach

    letsteach Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 2, 2008

    I teach my 5/6 year olds using Jolly Phonics. Each sound has an action which the children love. They are now onto digraphs and the results have been phenomenal. The first six sounds the children learn are s, a, t, i, p, n and from these 6 letters they have learnt the sightwords, it, is, I, a, an, as, in and so it builds up as we move through the programme. I try to make it fun and hands on learning. With the digraphs, especially with the vowels, they learn, "when two vowels go walking, the first does the talking". This is how we focus on the long vowel sounds.

    Sightword sentences, cut up sentences, using a candle to write a word and painting over it, writing words in shaving foam on the desk (they love this), collage words and I mime the action to sounds and the children have to tell me the word.

    As far as books go, look for non-fiction books that are used for home reading. Set him off on something really easy to build his confidence and give him the "I can" attituce.
     
  16. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,482
    Likes Received:
    97

    Nov 2, 2008

    He is supposed to be tested in the next week or so. I suspect there might be a learning problem, but I think the biggest issue is that the parents did not listen when the younger grade teachers (as far back as kinder and 1st) told them he would benefit greatly by repeating. So here we are now.

    Thanks for the website tgi! I have put it in my favorites. I like the game ideas. The idea to have him record his reading is also a great one. I will definately be using that one. I think he will get a real kick out of reading for the younger kids.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Emmanual sanchez,
  2. blazer
Total: 298 (members: 3, guests: 277, robots: 18)
test