Age appropriate crimes (6th grade)

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by BioAngel, Jul 5, 2012.

  1. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Jul 5, 2012

    I'm developing a forensic science unit for my 6th graders and I'm trying to think up of some not scary or violent examples of crimes. (I don't want anybody going home and asking their parents "Hey, what is sexual assault?" :eek:hmy: ) I teach at a Catholic school and my principal thinks this unit is a great idea, but I just have to be mindful that these kids tend to be "younger" than other 6th graders I've met and the parents raise them a certain way-- I'm sure you're getting at what I mean.

    Any suggestions? I'm putting together a sketch of a house and it's going to be trashed apart and the kids are going to have to figure out if its the dog that has been outside all day or the cat who's been sleeping upstairs all day. :)
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Who stole the cookie from the cookie jar

    Cheating on a test

    Locker break in
     
  4. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    What about situations at school? Maybe something involving some type of vandalism (a broken window or something)? Cheating?
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    This should get you started: http://www.mysteries-on-the-net.com/index2.html

    For Julia's 11th birthday, I hosted a Mystery party-- but didn't want a murder mystery. A site like the one I linked (maybe even the same one) had one where someone had put chilis into the chocolate at a chocolate factory. Fun, but not scary or gory.

    Instead of buying the whole kit, I would use the storyline as a jumping off place and change the details.
     
  6. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Forensic geology is super cool. You could do all sorts of things with soils from footprints.
     
  7. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Students have a habit of picking up certain stories that they think happened at school and it gets the parents all concerned. So if a kid talks to a buddy about vandalism in the science classroom its going to start issues I don't want to deal with. So I'm trying to think of stuff else where-- for the sake of my sanity :whistle:
     
  8. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    I see...

    Maybe look at the website for a series of kids mystery books--like Cam Jansen or Nate the Great to get ideas...
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I did a really fun one with students several years ago that had them testing the properties of a variety of white powders (powdered sugar, flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda). The scenario had something to do with items going missing from the school and the suspects included the cook, a baker who delivered to the school, etc). I'll see if I can dig it up in my old files.
     
  10. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    I found a lesson very similar to that actually and I'm planning on doing it-- its based on a baking contest gone wrong :)
     
  11. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jul 6, 2012

    We do the same lesson! It's actually pretty neat.

    We also do one with chromatography and pens. They have to match the pen to the ransom note (or whatever note you choose).
     
  12. Pencil Monkey

    Pencil Monkey Devotee

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    Jul 6, 2012

    maybe you could do something with foot prints and cast making? Invisible ink also comes to mind. The forensics teacher I used to work with did a bunch of things with finger printing.

    I remember a blood type lesson from my student teaching in sixth grade. Something about babies in a nursery being mixed up. It did not involve actually testing blood. But we had the baby blood types and some of the parent blood types and had to match them all up.
     
  13. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    You could do something with the Olympics. Maybe have an olympic medal go missing. The students could get clues like shoes prints, pieces of hair, fingerprints, a ransom note to match pen samples, powder testing, etc.
     
  14. TerriInCa

    TerriInCa Companion

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    When I taught science camp several years ago we did a "stolen puppy stuffed animal crime"

    It was cute. We had clues, took fingerprints, learned about DNA. I had just as much fun as the kids.

    Each day there would be different clues we would "find" and have to investigate. I wish I still ad the lesson plans for that!
     
  15. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    I was looking through an old Mailbox yearbook before I gave it away, and there is an activity called "Who Kidnapped Ted E Bear" that uses liquid chromatography to solve the mystery of who kidnapped the bear. I did it with my class once and it was really great. I was going to get rid of the book, so if you want to PM me, you can have it for the price of media mail shipping, BioAngel, or I can try scanning it, it's two pages.
     
  16. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 9, 2012

    You could do something that revolves around King Tut or Egyptians, possibly... or you can delve very vaguely into forensic anthropology because the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History has an entire display. Obviously, people have to figure out illnesses in history- and you can tell how a person suffered by looking at what remains. Obviously, you have to use discretion...

    You can also study fingerprints.

    All other ideas shared were good, too.
     
  17. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    I am completely blanking on the name, but our 2nd grade team bought a pre made unit that included fingerprinting, clues, etc. It was a lot of fun. Most of the "cases" involve something missing. I would keep it VERY low key.
     
  18. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    If you could try scanning it that would be great! I'm trying to keep all my files on a computer-- my bookshelves at home are already filled with teacher books and I'm not sure how much space I'll have in my classroom. ;) I'll send you a pm-- thanks so much!
     

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