After School Tutoring

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by SacTeacher, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. SacTeacher

    SacTeacher Rookie

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    Jan 26, 2012

    I have 6 1st grades that I am tutoring after school, I have taught 1st grade before, but am only subbing and tutoring right now - so no access to classroom materials.

    The kids are mostly low, they know all letter sounds and can blend a cvc word. A couple have some sight words down.

    Question is - what are some fun, active things I can do with them that teach reading skills? It's after school and these kids are DONE with the sitting and listening to a teacher for the day - not sure they are sitting still and listening during the school day either - hence the below grade level status.

    I would like most things to be me working directly with them - they are not great independent workers.

    I try to mix things up with lots of short lessons and have some center time with a Leap pad, writing page, flashcards, word dominoes. I can't buy any materials, so I need things I can make.

    Any great File Folder game sites?
     
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  3. bdsweetie

    bdsweetie Rookie

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    Jan 28, 2012

  4. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Feb 5, 2012

    I love that you are looking for fun and innovative ideas. However, my suggestion would be to work with the classroom teacher(s) to see how you can offer consistency and support what they are doing in the classroom (if that is an option). Have fun with it!
     
  5. SassyTeach

    SassyTeach Rookie

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    Feb 16, 2012

    Sight Word Hop - Have them hop on a sight word and say it as they land.

    Swat - Give them a fly swatter and tape sight words around the room. Put them in teams, call out a word, the first one to swat it earns a point for the team.

    Use Play-Doh to make words.

    Give them a short reading selection and have them highlight sight words.

    Trace words in a hair gel filled baggie (taped on top).

    Fill an old water bottle with salt and sight words on small slips of index card. Glue the lid on and let them shake and turn the bottle to find the words. Also works well to have them write the words down when they find them.

    I agree with iheartrecess - coordinate with the teacher too!
     
  6. bondo

    bondo Cohort

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    Feb 21, 2012

    Do you have access to computers? It's still sitting but its engaging them in a different way. This may enable you to have some working on the computer while you can work 1on1 or with 2 students at a time.
     
  7. yvonnemommy

    yvonnemommy Rookie

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    Jun 27, 2012

    Agree! DD has been learning math and reading online. We have been using this site beestar. She's always can't wait to doing the worksheets.:D
    Lisa
     
  8. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jun 28, 2012

    Are you talking about for the coming year or the summer? If for the summer, there's not much time left to put together a really organized program, but if you're talking for the school year, there are a few possible directions.

    If you're talking about next year, the first question is to determine your goal. Are you just looking to create an academically enriching environment, or actually achieve some specific reading goals? There's a difference, of course, between finding some fun games that give kids a few opportunities to practice reading skills, versus selecting a tutoring/reading program designed to achieve specific reading goals.
     
  9. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 28, 2012

    Even if "they know all letter sounds and can blend a cvc word," don't forget about phonemic awareness activities! You don't need any materials to clap out word sounds or syllables, break words up or blend them together, or listen for specific sounds in words and raise a hand or thumb when you hear them. Although I can't actually quote them, there have been studies that showed that students who received intensive and continuing phonemic awareness instruction made much greater gains in reading abilities than those who did not.
     

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