Advice

Discussion in 'High School' started by math_teacher, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. math_teacher

    math_teacher Companion

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    Feb 22, 2012

    I have a student who gets noticeably frustrated in class from time to time. One of his reactions has really been irking me.

    If he has something he is supposed to hand in (eg: exit ticket, quiz, ...) he will instead throw it on the floor and expect me to go find it. Or crumple it up and throw it in the trash. Neither of these are new - his previous teachers have told me that he did it to them too. One teacher collected tests after going over them with students to file. His dad called up a few days later to ask for specifics and she couldn't find it. Turns out he threw it in the trash instead of passing it forward like everyone else.

    Today he threw a quiz on the floor (I pretended not to notice) and went over to collect his and politely asked him where it was. His response was 'I don't know - maybe on the floor'. I asked him kindly if he could grab it for me (it was about one desk length away from him) he said no. So - no confrontation - I walked away. (In my head thinking - if you don't turn it in - fine take a zero....but I didn't express that to him)

    Now the reason I'm posting is that I have taken the no confrontation approach to him lately - when he behaves this way I don't get aggitated, argue with him, or give him any extra attention.

    Unfortunately, I haven't seen any improvement on his behavior. Yes - I give positive praise whenever possible to all my students and especially this one because I want him to get the attention he needs positively......

    HELP - I am hoping that the wealth of teaching minds can help me think of some other ways to handle this situation....
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Feb 22, 2012

    I would print up "missing assignment notes."

    Every time he threw a tantrum, I would fill one out: date, assignment (quiz on polynomial subtraction) and reaon (threw original on the floor.) Don't sweat the fact that he sees you doing it. When he asks, your response is "it's time for a paper trail."

    Don't engage him at all-- don't ask where his quiz is when you know it's on the floor. Just stop what you're doing, walk to your file, fill out the form, place it into your bag, and continue collecting for the rest of the class. If he asks what you're doing, it's "paperwork."

    I would keep a copy, and forward a copy to his guidance counselor. Maybe even give her a heads up tonight.
     
  4. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Feb 22, 2012

    Yeah I'd tell him: "Well if you don't have a paper to turn in, I don't have a paper to grade" and write down every assignment he does that for. Then call home and let them know that his grade is falling because he won't HAND in assignments.
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Feb 22, 2012

    Is this student on an IEP or 504 plan?

    I would make contact with his parents and guidance counselor. I would also make sure that he knows that you are not accepting assignments that he doesn't turn in correctly. Maybe fill out a form and give it to him so that you don't have to engage him but he knows that he is being held responsible.
     
  6. math_teacher

    math_teacher Companion

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    Feb 23, 2012

    Mopar -
    The student is classified -- I have maintained contact with the school psychologist who is also his case manager.

    Alice -
    Good idea on the paper trail.
     
  7. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Feb 23, 2012

    What does the school psychologist recommend? He/she probably has some ideas as this student is behaving this way in other classes as well.
     
  8. math_teacher

    math_teacher Companion

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    Feb 24, 2012

    This is the first time the student has behaved this way for me. (He had a track record of it in past years - but I never asked for advice because it seemed that he matured past this) The school psychologist has been out for personal reasons the past couple days so I haven't had a chance to run it past him. But upon his return I certainly will.

    I was just hoping that reaching out on this forum I could get some unbiased suggestions - that would perhaps be different and new from what I hear when I talk to people who know the student.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Feb 24, 2012

    I have to be totally honest... somehow it never occurred to me that there might be something behind this other than a simple temper tantrum.

    Of course, check to see if there's some sort of underlying issue.
     
  10. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Feb 24, 2012

     
  11. TeachOn

    TeachOn Habitué

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    Feb 24, 2012

    A surprising number of students will not turn in work even when it is completed because they are afraid to have it graded. I see it mostly with essays. Obviously such students are anxious and lack confidence likely both in their schoolwork and in their own worth. Generally I am pretty black and white about late work, but in these cases it's very important to build a comfortable and safe relationship with the student. I would talk to anybody available to help me accomplish that, starting with guidance, Sped/504, psychologist, then the parents.
     
  12. math_teacher

    math_teacher Companion

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    Feb 25, 2012

    While yes he has underlying issues.....should a temper tantrum be an acceptable response for an 11th grader?....no. I feel responsible to try and help him find other ways of expressing himself and dealing with frustration because even with his "issues" - he needs to be able to function in society. Temper tantrums will not be acceptable for someone over 18 years old in any walk of life (work, college....)
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Feb 25, 2012

    Right. But the nature of those issues might determine the most effective course of action.
     
  14. 907_Science

    907_Science New Member

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    Mar 8, 2012

    Wow, hearing about this kid makes my problems seem small. I like the idea of creating a log of misbehaviors that he engages in. Does anyone have any experience with this kind of thing? Where would a log like that go from your room? To an administrator? Counselor?
     

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