Advice on moving out of state and taking a job I may not want...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by mathematicalanomaly, Apr 24, 2018.

  1. mathematicalanomaly

    mathematicalanomaly Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2017
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    17

    Apr 24, 2018

    I'm moving from North Carolina to the west coast this summer. I have *GOT* to get out of NC and am moving no matter what. I have experience bartending and nanny agencies and catering etc so I know i'll be fine to pay my bills, on top of substitute teaching in whatever district but obviously a contracted position would be way less anxiety.

    I have (finally!) been given several Skype interviews and anticipate a job offer at the end of the business day to be honest.

    Now...this isn't exactly my dream job. I know it's not the ~morally right~ thing to do, but just how bad is it to take a position and then back out later if I were to be offered a "better" position? I know it puts the principal in a tough spot but to be honest, jobs in the state of Oregon are extremely competitive and I'm certain there would be another qualified candidate lined up to take my place immediately.

    My current contract states I can leave with 30 days notice and I imagine most teaching contracts to have a similar clause?

    If I were to accept this position tonight, but then keep applying to other schools and be offered a better one in a few weeks, if I gave my 30 days (or however many) notice, am I going to be ~black listed~ in some way? I know the admin would probably be pissed but here in NC there's nothing they can really do about it, not sure about OR?

    Obviously I know the right thing to do is to just pass on the job if I don't want it that bad but I don't have a safety net here. No family, not a whole lot of savings after moving cross country, apartment deposits etc. Doing this through sheer determination basically. I would be kicking myself so hard if I move in July with no position lined up and I turned one down, even if it wasn't ideal.

    I am inclined to take the position because, well, beggers can't be choosers. But the whole point of me moving out of state is in search of a less exhausting position in a better school....but obviously if it's my only option to get my foot in the door and get some Oregon state experience. The position isn't bad, just not my first choice of a grade level and the school isn't awful or anything. I'm sure it would be fine. I would love my kiddos and work hard even if it's not the school culture I was seeking or the type of town I really ultimately want to plant some roots in.

    Ughhhh I don't know. Obviously I'm not asking if it's the right thing to do, because I know it's not. I guess I'm asking what kind of ramifications this could have on my future career?

    I know teachers leave jobs all the time, in the middle of the year and other undesirable times. This in the grand scheme of things would be me backing out of a contract before the year has even started.

    Thoughts, opinions?
     
  2.  
  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,764
    Likes Received:
    1,723

    Apr 24, 2018

    i would take the job since you have no safety net. A year in a school/position you don't particularly like would give you much needed experience and it would also allow you to check things out in the area you will be living in. It would be easier for you to find your ideal job when you are actually living there.
     
    futuremathsprof and bella84 like this.
  4. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    518

    Apr 24, 2018

    Not a big deal at all! They just go to #2 on the list. It's not uncommon in any competitive field.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2018
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,935
    Likes Received:
    1,923

    Apr 24, 2018

    My district doesn't have a 30 day notice clause, and none of the public school districts where I've worked have had such a clause. In my state, if you break your contract after signing it, the district can charge you thousands of dollars in fees, plus make a formal request that the state revoke your license. This is true even if you break your contract in the summer before the school year begins. Some administrators are understanding and will work with you, but they don't have to. I would not go into it just assuming that you have a 30-day notice clause like you do in your current school. You should research it first. All districts and states have differing requirements.
     
    Caesar753 and Leaborb192 like this.
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,868
    Likes Received:
    2,938

    Apr 24, 2018

    Honestly, this is the kind of nitty gritty details that I would want up front, for whatever reason. What if suddenly you couldn't move, leaving you in NC? You would want to know the answers to "what if." I tend to be someone who likes to know what could legally come back to haunt me before breaking a contract. Where I am now, it is 60 days notice, which should be fine, but if it is not "at will" employment, I would want that information to consider. Some states seem hell bent on the punitive side of things, others are more like "your loss."

    Since there is a transcontinental move involved, I would ask more questions, not less, but that is just my opinion.
     
  7. mathematicalanomaly

    mathematicalanomaly Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2017
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    17

    Apr 24, 2018

    I was offered the position, and there is a 30 day notice requirement. Woo hoo!!
     
    futuremathsprof and bella84 like this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. DreamerSeeker
Total: 236 (members: 3, guests: 207, robots: 26)
test