advice needed

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by boogaboo214, Jan 10, 2006.

  1. boogaboo214

    boogaboo214 Companion

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    Jan 10, 2006

    i am teaching a 20 yearold how to read. she took an assesment test and it put her on a first grade level. she wants to get her GED and even possibly go to college.she knows it is going to take a lot of work to get there. we had our first session earlier this week and it went well. My problem is that I am a student in college. Time with her is not a problem. I just need some Ideas on a game plan. our first session i gave her spelling words and some activities to do with them. we are working on getting her addition top notch before we move on to subtraction. in language we went over what nouns and verbs are,and she has activities to complete on them. reading we got her a library card and checked out 2 books for her to read anddo book reports on and i plan on doing this every week.she can read a little but she has a lot of trouble. we are into books that I read my 4 year old.I also gave her a journal type book and she is going to write a story or two a week for us to correct her grammar in and i figured it would also help her get used to using words on paper and even get her using a dictionary a little. any body have any ideas as to any thing else that i might need to do? i have found many websites that have printable worksheets for us to use. and i have even found first grade spelling words on line that are in weekly lists. oh i guess i should also mention that she has a slow learning disorder it takes her longer to get things. and she is raising her three year old and is pregnate with her second child she is a single mom and the dad of the second is not in the picture so i also have to be sensitive to her stress level. any ideas are welcome.
     
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  3. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Jan 10, 2006

    Does she mind reading books that are for kindergartners or first graders? I know some people are embarrassed to be learning to read those type of books. If she isn't. Maybe try getting the Joy Cowley series. Go to the local elementary school that she lives in maybe they will let you borrow copies of their reading program.
     
  4. boogaboo214

    boogaboo214 Companion

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    Jan 10, 2006

    she has a three year old so it is odk to get childrens books she is a little embarassed but the books she is on islomething like what she would read to her daughter. i encourage her to read the books to her that way she can read out loud. what is the Joy crowley series. is it a titled series like courious george or is it random i might be able to fild them at our local library. we have a wonderful childrens library in ou county library.
     
  5. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Jan 10, 2006

    Joy Cowley (not R sorry if I wrote that before), has a guided reading program.
    http://www.joycowley.com/storybox.shtml
     
  6. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    Jan 10, 2006

    I would try taking books on tape out of the library. She and her daughter can listen to them together at night while 'reading'. Also, get some newspapers/magazines for kids, any elementary school can spare a copy once in a while. Call the teachers directly.

    Give her word finds -esp with a theme, like weather, or plants. That way she gets familiar with words with zero stress.

    The books you want (or will want as she progresses) are called high/low, high interest, low reading level. The best high/low books in the world are Dr. Seuss books. She can read them to her daughter, it it practice pronouncing and sounding out words, also many of the books have adult themes that can be discussed. (pollution, racism etc). I use Dr. Seuss with my 9th graders.

    Have her watch the GED and high school prep shows that come on PBS and public access. You can find a schedule for PBS online.

    Another idea is to have her always keep the closed caption on on her TV. Some shows have great CC, others suck, but I'd suspect the GED shows and sesame street will have good CC.

    I used to teach GED classes in NY, and if you need some materials, send me a message and I can send you some things. They're higher level than your gal though.

    Pats on the back for helping this woman out. She obviously needs a huge change of course, and this may do it. Good luck and stay positive.
     
  7. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Jan 10, 2006

    I don't know a lot about the GED, but my advice would be to take it slow. It sounds like you have a lot of good ideas, but you don't want to burn her out right away. That is a big reason kids give up and drop out, because after they get so far behind, it is too much of a task to even bother trying to get caught up. She sounds motivated, but as a mother of 2 myself, I know how easy it is to forget about myself and focus on the kids. That would be an easy out for her.

    I like the books on tape idea. I bet her kids would love it too. Also, maybe try to focus more on real world applications, like using the newspaper to find spelling words-and let her pick them. Select words that are found on menus, applications, road signs, etc. They are probably higher than first grade level, but if you only have 5-10 or so, she should be able to handle it, especially if she is constantly around them (news, sports, dollar, stop, gas, food, eat, drink, etc). For activities with this, I wouldn't have her start out writing sentences or anything. Have her write or tell where she saw this word. Describe the location. Where else might this word be found. For tomorrow: find as many of these words as you can in OTHER places. (Gas at the station, but also on the gas bill)

    Once you have her reading more, things like grammar will be much easier. Have her describe a typical evening getting her child ready for bed. What are the "things" she uses? What does she "do" with them? There are your nouns and verbs.

    Math-does she have a checkbook? Hopefully she is not like me and never balances it :) , use it for addition and subtraction. You might need to use play money. Example: I have $100 in monopoly money. My groceries were $25, and my electric bill was $30. How much money do I have left? Have her actually count out the bills. Then set up the addition/subtraction problem. Or go to a store and have her figure out how much milk, bread, and eggs will cost.

    Like I said, I don't know much about the GED, but I would not focus on the test yet. Get her comfortable with the knowledge she has, build some confidence, then work up to higher level thinking. I am just guessing, but is the GED more practical questions rather than "2 trains left Chicago traveling..."?

    Hope this helps. Good luck, and bless you!
    kcjo
     
  8. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Jan 10, 2006

    I don't know a lot about the GED, but my advice would be to take it slow. It sounds like you have a lot of good ideas, but you don't want to burn her out right away. That is a big reason kids give up and drop out, because after they get so far behind, it is too much of a task to even bother trying to get caught up. She sounds motivated, but as a mother of 2 myself, I know how easy it is to forget about myself and focus on the kids. That would be an easy out for her.

    I like the books on tape idea. I bet her kids would love it too. Also, maybe try to focus more on real world applications, like using the newspaper to find spelling words-and let her pick them. Select words that are found on menus, applications, road signs, etc. They are probably higher than first grade level, but if you only have 5-10 or so, she should be able to handle it, especially if she is constantly around them (news, sports, dollar, stop, gas, food, eat, drink, etc). For activities with this, I wouldn't have her start out writing sentences or anything. Have her write or tell where she saw this word. Describe the location. Where else might this word be found. For tomorrow: find as many of these words as you can in OTHER places. (Gas at the station, but also on the gas bill)

    Once you have her reading more, things like grammar will be much easier. Have her describe a typical evening getting her child ready for bed. What are the "things" she uses? What does she "do" with them? There are your nouns and verbs.

    Math-does she have a checkbook? Hopefully she is not like me and never balances it :) , use it for addition and subtraction. You might need to use play money. Example: I have $100 in monopoly money. My groceries were $25, and my electric bill was $30. How much money do I have left? Have her actually count out the bills. Then set up the addition/subtraction problem. Or go to a store and have her figure out how much milk, bread, and eggs will cost.

    Like I said, I don't know much about the GED, but I would not focus on the test yet. Get her comfortable with the knowledge she has, build some confidence, then work up to higher level thinking. I am just guessing, but is the GED more practical questions rather than "2 trains left Chicago traveling..."?

    Hope this helps. Good luck, and bless you!
    kcjo
     
  9. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Sorry! Spastic clicking finger syndrome!

    kcjo
     
  10. boogaboo214

    boogaboo214 Companion

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    Jan 11, 2006

    we are not really aiming for the GED test yet that is the eventual goal. we are just tring to get her to the point that she can take care of herself and her children right now.she is my aunt neice and as for right now my aunt basically has to treat her as a 14 or 15 year old because she is not mentally at 20 yet.and it is because of the learning disability.you guys have had some great ideas so far please keep them coming i can use all the help i can get especially since i dont have my degree yet.
     
  11. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Jan 12, 2006

    Then I would say most definetely, don't treat this so much like "school" right now. Just get her to read read read and do things that will allow her to function as an adult. The rest will come eventually.

    kcjo
     
  12. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    Jan 12, 2006

    The GED is actually a lot like, 'one train leaves chicago'
    It's not that extreme, but it tests a lot more than practical skills.

    Using real world words and applications is a great idea. The simple fact that she can read the signs and menues she couldn't make out before will be encouraging for her.

    I would encourage her to journal, even if it's just on a calendar and it's one sentence a day, she'll familiarize herself wih whatever words are on the calendar. Find one with writing on it, like a school district calendar (I can send you one if you need one) tha details events and conferences etc. Most schools send home a newsletter or calendar. You can have her transfer the events from the newsletter to the calendar. (ex ...on February third there is a PTA meeting) to pratice her writing and make her feel connected wih the community/school.

    Leave her notes when you can. If you buy or give her something, write a note and stick it on. ("I was thinking of you." "Hope you like cheese!" "Enjoy the boots!")

    Help her write noes to her daughter, which she will read to her later.

    I wouldn't have her do 'reports'. maybe you can give her a graphic organizer- very simple one, and have her copy the characters names, title of the book, and a detail or two (setting, whether she liked it, how long it was) here's one I just made for you.http://mshutch.com/documents/SIMPLEGO.doc

    She's definitely a long way off from the GED, but it's the nearest 'carrot' she has, so keep talking about it.
     
  13. boogaboo214

    boogaboo214 Companion

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    Jan 14, 2006

    i already encourage her to write a passage in her journal each day I also email her each day and request thar she email me back. and as far as the school thing if we dont have routine she wont take anything away and we cant do the same thing for long periods at time so concentrating on math and some basic sentence structure is a mild diversion from reading for long periods. right now we are learning nouns and verbs so that it will help her with writing sentences. thanks for you guys' imput it is really helping any more suggestions kep them comming
     

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