Advice for classroom teachers.

Discussion in 'ESL/ELL' started by roseteacher12, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. roseteacher12

    roseteacher12 Habitué

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    Feb 12, 2010

    I am not an ESl/ELL teacher but I am looking for some advice on how to do better instructional activities for the 4 ESL students in my class. What are some things I can do to adapt lessons to them?
     
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  3. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    Feb 14, 2010

    Could you give some more information about their language level? Can they talk conversationally? What is their first language? Can they read in it? How is their reading and writing in English.
    I'm happy to help with ideas, but more info would help.
     
  4. roseteacher12

    roseteacher12 Habitué

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    Feb 15, 2010

    no problem =) they all speak English relatively well. I have one who struggles with pronunciation. The others do not speak english much at home but have a pretty good grasp of it; it is mostly vocabulary they struggle with. They are all able to have a conversation. One of the students speaks Spanish at home; the other 3 speak Turkish. The one who speaks Spanish is doing "ok"; she knows her sight words and most letters sounds. The others struggles with sounds, sight words and some letter recognition. They go out for ESL instruction one period a day.
     
  5. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    Feb 17, 2010

    Vocabulary will take a lot of time to develop. Provide times for peer interaction throughout the day- at centers, at meeting ie "Tell a friend the weather today."
    Have some basic picture dictionaries available for writing time so they can have more options for words. I recommend the one with thematic pages versus ABC order.
    Don't try to teach sight words that you don't hear them use in their conversations, they don't have enough meaning to them.
    Do object boxes, collect things that start with letter sounds. Its okay if they have to learn the names of some of the objects.
    Engage in alot of phonemic awareness: rhyming words, breaking words into parts, listening for words that are the same and different (Ex Say "cat/ cut- is that the same word or different?"). You might be surprised that they have a hard time hearing the differences, but with practice can learn to discriminate.
    During guided reading, do a more extensive picture walk and practice any new structures in the book.
     
  6. roseteacher12

    roseteacher12 Habitué

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    Feb 18, 2010

    thank you! these are some great suggestions!! I will definetely be implementing some of them!:D
     
  7. vsimpkins

    vsimpkins Comrade

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    May 8, 2010

    IN first grade we are working with emotions, sad, mad, happy, excited......
    Then we tie in a writing on I am ____ when ______.

    Dicussed how to handle situations outside of the classroom. Instead of tattling, being brave and walking away.
     
  8. Orlandoiam

    Orlandoiam Rookie

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    May 12, 2010

    Not sure about your students' level of English but recognize there's a difference between conversational English and academic English. BICS vs. CALPS. Lots of words your students will be introduced to in the classroom are quite different than the conversations they have when interacting with peers.
     
  9. dudeteacher

    dudeteacher Rookie

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    Jan 9, 2011

    Language Lines

    Even as native English speakers we sometimes struggle with just the right words to explain, describe, or clarify what we want to communicate. Our brains are wired to understand (input) more than we can speak (output). A great way to positively engage English language learners (ELL), or any of your students for that matter, in actively acquiring new material is to give them a frame in which to communicate their responses.

    The Positive Engagement Project (you can search for them on google....everything is FREE!) has compiled six different sets of Language Line sentence frames that can be used to help give students a framework to express six essential comprehension skills: cause and effect, classifying, comparison and contrast, evaluating, predicting, and summarizing.

    For each of the six sets of Language Lines, we have color coded the frames to give the teacher an opportunity to differentiate the language skills for students in their classroom.
     
  10. sanjacteacher

    sanjacteacher Rookie

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    Jan 9, 2011

    Language Lines

    I've used many sentence frames in the past with my EL kids. I do like how the Language Lines are grouped and color coded for different levels. Good stuff.
     
  11. tnv

    tnv Rookie

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    Jan 11, 2011

    I just found the site with the grouped language lines for EL kids. I downloaded the pdf and looked them over and am going to try with my kids tomorrow. I'll post to let you all know how it goes.

    TNV
     
  12. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jan 11, 2011

    You should look up SDAIE strategies online....
     

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