Advice for a new private school teacher!

Discussion in 'Private School Teachers' started by houseofbooks, Aug 23, 2014.

  1. houseofbooks

    houseofbooks Companion

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    Aug 23, 2014

    Hello! After searching for two years, I found a full time job in a private/Catholic high school. For you awesome private school veterans, what advice would you give a teacher who has exclusively taught in public schools? We have a ton of control over the curriculum, and I know I need to get used to that, but what other differences are there?

    I realize these questions are VERY broad and that every school is different, but I'd appreciate any advice you can throw in my direction. Thank you. :wub:
     
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  3. mcqxu

    mcqxu Comrade

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    Aug 30, 2014

    Congratulations! You are right that every school is different. I have taught mostly in independent schools, most of that time in Catholic independent schools. I also did teach in the public sector for a brief time.

    I think a big challenge can be parent expectations. I bend over backwards to avoid conflicts by staying in frequent communication with parents at my school (I teach in primary). Be prepared for parents to be very involved.

    I find that the freedom in our curriculum is a very good thing. I teach in an area that is not tested by the state but still look at our state standards when planning.

    The demographics of private schools can be very different as well, of course depending on the school. If it is an expensive school you will likely be working with kids from wealthy families. This is not a bad thing, but the issues you may see are different. I've heard this is a good book, but still have yet to read it so can't actually recommend:http://http://www.amazon.com/The-Price-Privilege-Generation-Disconnected/dp/006059585X

    Like you said, all schools are different and I find my school is very supportive of teachers and kids are behaved. I also love working in a faith-based environment and having smaller classes. You will figure our the ins and outs pretty soon! Good luck!
     
  4. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Aug 30, 2014

    Get used to "surprise" interruptions that lead to incredible teaching moments. We only go up to middle school at my Catholic school, but the middle school teachers have had to learn to be more flexible, as schedules get changed with little notice -- the bishop comes for a visit, a great guest speaker is arranged on very short notice, an important benefactor is ill and get well cards need to be made, etc. It is hard to balance the desire to protect your instructional time with other needs of the school.

    Second, get used to dressing modestly (watch the cut of the blouse in the front). Some Catholic schools may not be this way, but all of them that I've been in require modest attire...not ridiculously modest, but clevage needs to be covered and skirts shouldn't be too short.

    Last, parents tend to be very supportive and involved. It is nice, but sometimes they can be a bit *too* involved. Find the balance.

    I love the Catholic school where I teach. I can't imagine a more family oriented place to work, or more caring people to work with.

    Enjoy your new job! You'll have a great time.
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 30, 2014

    I agree with the above responses. I never taught in Catholic schools, but I taught in private schools. Parents can hold a lot of sway and you may get more than your share of overprotective parents. That said, Catholic schools in my area are very different from non-religious private schools. The admin seems less willing to accommodate parents and more 'by the book'. Most of the Catholic schools around here have added services over the years, but may not recognize learning differences to the extent that public school does.
     
  6. sarahwilla

    sarahwilla Rookie

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    Sep 9, 2014

    private schools are a bit better than the public schools i guess. i never thought in private school
     

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