Advice for a job seeker in NY who takes mass transit

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by MissPapa, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Jan 25, 2013

    So I live in Brooklyn and am in the NYC Dept of Ed system as a substitute teacher. I do not own a car at the moment, can't afford one and have absolutely no experience driving on the highway. I'm right about to apply for jobs as the NYCDOE job applications for the 2013-2014 year is about to become available by the end of January and am currently working on my cover letter and tightening up my portfolio.

    As times get rougher, is it wise to apply for jobs outside of NYC, like Long Island or Westchester, even if I have to take long train rides on MTA plus LIRR or MetroNorth?

    All advice are welcomed. Thank you! :D
     
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  3. MissD59

    MissD59 Comrade

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    Jan 26, 2013

    There are very few schools on Long Island that you could commute to via train. You would need a car to get you from the LIRR station to your school, in almost all cases. Cabs on Long Island are not like cabs in NYC, they tend to be more expensive.

    The job market on Long Island is, as I understand it, worse than the city. What are you certified in?
     
  4. kmeteach

    kmeteach Companion

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    Jan 27, 2013

    I agree with MissD, I work on LI and commuting to here from the city would be a hassle. There aren't many permanent teaching jobs available, mainly leave replacements and subbing...and even those are few.
     
  5. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Jan 28, 2013

    I'm getting dual certification in gen ed and special ed grades 1-6 in May. So I take it to just stick to the five boroughs?

    I really want to be permanent by September, that's why. Subbing is nice only when you have to student teach :)

    Thanks guys!
     
  6. redtop

    redtop Companion

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    Jan 28, 2013

    If you were to get a full-time job outside the city, wouldn't you move closer to work?

    My wife lives in downtown Toronto, and does not have a car. She rides a bicycle to work every day - regardless of the weather.

    I think it's very likely you could find suitable housing within walking/bicycling/bus distance of your school.

    If you are living with family and cannot relocate, then stick to the five boroughs.
     
  7. MissD59

    MissD59 Comrade

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    Jan 28, 2013

    It's actually not very likely that one can find suitable housing within walking/bicycling/bus distance of a Long Island elementary school. Long Island is a suburban area outside of NYC and it is NOT bike friendly. Our public bus service is very bad. We really don't have public transportation here. If you are living a bike ride or walk away from an elementary school, you are NOT a bike ride away from any stores in the vast majority of cases. You very much need a car to live here.

    Not only that, but Long Island is not a great place for a renter. There are very few apartment communities here; it's not renter friendly.

    While I understand your wife bikes to work, Long Island really is a unique place. I love it here, but I also hate some things about it.

    I have my MS in Elementary Ed; I'm certified in Childhood 1-6, Early Childhood Birth-Grade 2, Students with Disabilities, and I'm almost finished with my Literacy certification. Here on Long Island, the teaching job market is so rough that nearly every Elementary general education leave replacement I've seen listed wants candidates to be certified in Childhood, Early Childhood, Students with Disabilities, and I've even seen Literacy added in there; all for a GenEd elementary leave! As far as subbing goes, even that can be competitive. The district I attended my entire life took 3 months to even call me for a subbing interview; 2 of my friends experienced the same thing.

    I got my MS in Eled in May 2010. I have done mass mailings of my resume and cover letter to nearly every district on Long Island. I only know of two people from my masters program who have full time teaching positions; both are at charter schools in the city. The teaching job market here is VERY grim. I don't mean to be pessimistic, but the likelihood of gaining a permanent position in September on Long Island is pretty small with the current conditions.

    I would just stick to the DOE. I am personally flirting with the idea of applying for next year. Your outlook is pretty good if you're dual certified/have special ed, I'm told.
     
  8. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Jan 28, 2013

    Thanks guys. I thought looking everywhere would make my chances of getting a job higher. Apparently not. Guess I'll be applying all over the five boroughs as well as looking good at the schools I sub and the one I student teach at. Also asked for advice from my mom and my boyfriend, they also said stick to the five boroughs.
     
  9. kmeteach

    kmeteach Companion

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    Jan 29, 2013

    I think your best bet would be to stick with the NYC DOE. I believe they are opening up their teacher applications soon, I will probably send in another application myself, just in case.

    I have my Master's in General and Special Ed, and I am certified in Childhood and Students w/ Disabilities (1-6). I am a TA. Permanent teaching jobs for recent grads are slim to none. Most TAs I know are certified teachers (and most districts now require that you be a certified teacher to be a TA). Friends that I graduated with/graduated recently are either TAs or subs. And I graduated 4 years ago.

    Long story short, apply to NYC schools, but it doesn't hurt to apply on LI if you think you want to give it a shot anyway.
     

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