Adjective list to describe objects (not persons) - 3rd grade-ish

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by BioAngel, Sep 10, 2016.

  1. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Sep 10, 2016

    I'm seeing some of my 3rd graders struggling with describing substances. I can ask them "How does it feel?" and they jump to "It feels like soap" but don't have the vocabulary to describe what that object feels like. I'm mostly finding adjective lists that describe a person - not so much luck for objects (and most object lists include words way over their heads).

    Does anybody have something they can share with me that I can use as a resource for my students? Even if it's on TpT or something similar. At least then they can choose words from the list.
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Sep 10, 2016

    Appearance adjectives
    • adorable
    • beautiful
    • clean
    • drab
    • elegant
    • fancy
    • glamorous
    • handsome
    • long
    • magnificent
    • old-fashioned
    • plain
    • quaint
    • sparkling
    • ugliest
    • unsightly
    • wide-eyed


    Color adjectives
    • red
    • orange
    • yellow
    • green
    • blue
    • purple
    • gray
    • black
    • white


    Condition adjectives
    • alive
    • better
    • careful
    • clever
    • dead
    • easy
    • famous
    • gifted
    • helpful
    • important
    • inexpensive
    • mushy
    • odd
    • powerful
    • rich
    • shy
    • tender
    • uninterested
    • vast
    • wrong


    Personality adjectives – Positive
    • agreeable
    • brave
    • calm
    • delightful
    • eager
    • faithful
    • gentle
    • happy
    • jolly
    • kind
    • lively
    • nice
    • obedient
    • proud
    • relieved
    • silly
    • thankful
    • victorious
    • witty
    • zealous
    Personality adjectives – Negative
    • angry
    • bewildered
    • clumsy
    • defeated
    • embarrassed
    • fierce
    • grumpy
    • helpless
    • itchy
    • jealous
    • lazy
    • mysterious
    • nervous
    • obnoxious
    • panicky
    • repulsive
    • scary
    • thoughtless
    • uptight
    • worried


    Shape adjectives
    • broad
    • chubby
    • crooked
    • curved
    • deep
    • flat
    • high
    • hollow
    • low
    • narrow
    • round
    • shallow
    • skinny
    • square
    • steep
    • straight
    • wide


    Size adjectives
    • big
    • colossal
    • fat
    • gigantic
    • great
    • huge
    • immense
    • large
    • little
    • mammoth
    • massive
    • miniature
    • petite
    • puny
    • scrawny
    • short
    • small
    • tall
    • teeny
    • teeny-tiny
    • tiny


    Sound adjectives
    • cooing
    • deafening
    • faint
    • hissing
    • loud
    • melodic
    • noisy
    • purring
    • quiet
    • raspy
    • screeching
    • thundering
    • voiceless
    • whispering


    Time adjectives
    • ancient
    • brief
    • early
    • fast
    • late
    • long
    • modern
    • old
    • old-fashioned
    • quick
    • rapid
    • short
    • slow
    • swift
    • young


    Taste/touch adjectives
    • bitter
    • delicious
    • fresh
    • greasy
    • juicy
    • hot
    • icy
    • loose
    • melted
    • nutritious
    • prickly
    • rainy
    • rotten
    • salty
    • sticky
    • strong
    • sweet
    • tart
    • tasteless
    • uneven
    • weak
    • wet
    • wooden
    • yummy


    Touch adjectives
    • boiling
    • breeze
    • broken
    • bumpy
    • chilly
    • cold
    • cool
    • creepy
    • crooked
    • cuddly
    • curly
    • damaged
    • damp
    • dirty
    • dry
    • dusty
    • filthy
    • flaky
    • fluffy
    • freezing
    • hot
    • warm
    • wet


    Quantity adjectives
    • abundant
    • empty
    • few
    • full
    • heavy
    • light
    • many
    • numerous
    • sparse
    • substantial


    • A
    • B
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • H
    • I
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • P
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • T
    • U
    • V
    • W
    • X
    • Y
    • Z
    • aback abaft abandoned abashed aberrant abhorrent abiding abject ablaze able abnormal aboard aboriginal abortive abounding abrasive abrupt absent absorbed absorbing abstracted absurd abundant abusive acceptable accessible accidental accurate acid acidic acoustic acrid actually ad hoc adamant adaptable addicted adhesive adjoining adorable adventurous afraid aggressive agonizing agreeable ahead ajar alcoholic alert alike alive alleged alluring aloof amazing ambiguous ambitious amuck amused amusing ancient angry animated annoyed annoying anxious apathetic aquatic aromatic arrogant ashamed aspiring assorted astonishing attractive auspicious automatic available average awake aware awesome awful axiomatic
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Sep 10, 2016

    Before giving them lists, have them make a chart with the five senses across the top and choose at least one adjective for a particular object for each sense. I would do this as a whole group at first.
     
  5. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Sep 10, 2016

    Well it really is hard for a lot of them to describe anything other than animals or people, since that's what we spend a lot of time enforcing.
    What does the "pizza" taste like?
    It tastes "good." It's "hot." "It takes like pepperoni pizza." That's pretty much what we give them.

    You really need to work with them and give them a lot of opportunities to practice. Write down a list of adjectives you want them to AVOID using when talking about objects to help enrich their vocabulary, which of course you will also need to teach.

    Create a circle map of an object/substance, whatever, and then practice describing it.
    "It feels like soap." It's soapy. Soapy is an adjective.

    What exactly do you want them to describe? And what do they usually say?

    And I agree about describing using the 5 senses, because that provides them the frame of mind that they need.
    Ask a child to describe what an object SMELLS or SOUNDS like, and watch them really flounder.
    But an author won't just say, "The water was blue and warm," for the rest of the kids' lives. So they need to be able to describe beyond that as well.

    And of course you could work together to improve sentences & adjectives. But it's all about enriching a student's vocabulary. Of course they don't have it. Your job is to teach it. And the more opportunities you can actually provide for the students to see, hear, feel/touch, smell, and taste the objects, the better.

    :):thumbs:
     

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