ADHD

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by microbe, Jul 3, 2013.

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  1. microbe

    microbe Comrade

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    I've done a lot of research about ADHD while I was in college, because it was something I have a personal interest in (my little brother was diagnosed with ADHD as a very young child). I've often wondered if ADHD was simply a symptom to a larger problem - feeding children sugary foods and then forcing them to sit still in a classroom all day. Sometimes I wonder if it is a legitimate brain disorder that is extremely difficult to detect (it supposedly runs in my family, but the women "never" have it).

    I'm curious if ADHD (or ADD) is over-diagnosed in boys and under-diagnosed in girls. I'm also curious if the forum feels if it is a legitimate disorder and not the product of a child's environment.

    Also, if you have ADHD stories to share, would you mind sharing them? :) My little brother's teachers encouraged my folks to get my brother put on medication (I believe this is now illegal) because he was very energetic and had a hard time staying in his seat - he was a very difficult little boy to have in class. My parents went to an expert, my brother was diagnosed with ADHD, and he was immediately put in Ritalin. My parents noticed a huge change in his personality. He went from a very affectionate and energetic little boy to a lethargic, depressed zombie. My parents decided to take him off Ritalin completely and never listen to the experts again.

    Now that I think about it, I wonder if he was simply given too high of a dose. Perhaps a more appropriate dose would have had desirable results for everyone. Perhaps his behavior was entirely based on his diet and the very traditional classrooms he was in.

    Thank you for your time. :)
     
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  3. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Generally my first response is that no way would I want my kids on any medication at such a young age.

    With that said, I did have a student with ADHD who was on medication. The medication did not make him lethargic or "zombie" like. It truly had a positive impact on him both socially and academically at school.
     
  4. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    I have had many students with ADHD over the years. Before those experiences, I had many of the same questions as you. After having those children in class, I have NO DOUBT that it is a legitimate disorder. These children had a very difficult time functioning in the classroom when they were on no medicine (or the wrong one, or the wrong dosage--it takes constant monitoring and often frequent adjustment to find what works for each child). And it didn't necessarily have to do with staying in their seats, but rather being able to attend to the lessons and activities we were doing--even if those things were very active.

    In my experience, I've had about an even split of boys and girls who were diagnosed.
     
  5. selftaught

    selftaught Rookie

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    I have ADHD. With goes hand and hand with numerous disorders. Such as Tourette Syndrome , which I also have.

    I think it is over diagnosed and doctors don't fully understand it yet, it is legitimate but it's hard to know the exact premises of ADHD.

    I went on medication at age 5, it sucked, went through at least 8 different meds. One of which basically super-charged me and I couldn't sit still, but I could focus, my reflexes and senses were higher than they have ever been. Think adrenaline rush type feeling. I finally wound up on stratera (I'm unsure of spelling), which worked but every month my dose had to go up.

    Now, the medication sucked, it wasn't fun. However, the problem was my teachers, they were (I'm sorry but I hate ignorance) babbling fools when it came to me. Some methods they tried scared me, I still have memories that haunt me. I also became the outcast, teachers refused to do anything about those who bullied me, and I had one teacher who did bully me.

    I also went to see therapists, and that to this day still creeps me out. Similar to how some people hate clowns.

    Age also plays a factor, as I've gotten older ive learned methods to cope, and control ADHD & Tourette's.

    Now, as for school, the meds, teachers, therapists, did no good at all. I had a stack of papers I was supposed to do over the summer all though elementary school, about 5 inches high.

    Once I hit middle school. Something changed, I went from an able to work to a straight A student and a perfect 4.0 GPA. I was advanced in almost every class. HS was similar but I cared a little less. I did my best but I also wanted to enjoy what I did. I had friends who were the top ranked students, I was top 20's regular and honors. I was apart of NHS.

    It all boils down to the student, I had a will to do well but enjoy what I did. I wanted to work in science, then and now engineering. I wanted to make a "lot" of money, and do fun things when I got older.


    The best thing a teacher can do is be supportive and try to be understanding.

    I'm sorry I don't have a way to explaining things but... If you have questions you're welcome to ask, I don't mind talking about it because it teaches one more person how to deal with ADHD. Weather they have it or a student does.
     
  6. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    I think there is more of a problem with our schools (pushing too much too early, too little time to be children), than there is with our children.

    Are there children who legit need medication? Absolutely. But when so many children are being diagnosed, I tend to think they're not the ones who need to "change".
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    While I think that there can be an environmental component to ADHD, I believe that it is an actual thing. I used to work at an inpatient psychiatric hospital for children and adolescents. We would regularly have patients who were undergoing a "med wash": all their medications were being stopped and gradually reintroduced, usually because there was some problem or too many side effects with whatever cocktail of meds they were getting, all under the care and observation of trained nurses and doctors. I recall working with many, many children who displayed classic ADHD behaviors--and severely!--once their meds wore off. Thankfully those kids were in a safe place where the effects of their new medication could be monitored and adjusted until it was ideal.

    Certainly there are some kids who are inappropriately diagnosed. There are probably also some kids who are appropriately diagnosed but who do not need medication and could be able to manage their ADHD with diet changes. There are some, however, who need those meds, even at a very young age.
     
  8. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    I believe ADHD is misdiagnosed in a large portion of cases. Especially young teens. They can't focus? Medicate them. How about they can't focus because they have raging hormones and unstable emotions?

    I have known many students who DO have an overwhelming deficit in their ability to focus and sustain attention. These kids have an attention span that is much shorter than their peers. I've even have one kid with horrible ADHD, but couldn't take medication due to a heart defect (he was a handful!) However, I have known just as many students who drift off every once in a while, maybe forget the directions here and there. The next day, they're telling me that they were put on ADHD meds.

    Contributing to that is a doctor in town that hands out meds to kids like they're skittles. His name brings groans and grimaces from teachers, counselors, and social workers alike.
     
  9. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    There have actually been research studies about the sugar question and there is no support for that idea. In other words, sugar intake doesn't seem to relate to ADHD symptoms.

    In terms of forcing them to sit still, there is definitely truth that internal mental health issues interact with one's environment. To the extent that the environment is expecting too much, even kids within normal limits of hyperactivity & impulsivity will display symptoms. I'm sure you can ask any first grade teacher how many kids appear hyperactive at 1:45 on a sunny day in May :).

    Still, there is no doubt that there are kids who struggle with hyperactivity and impulsivity even within normal environmental expectations. In short, no - ADHD is not caused by environmental factors such as having to sit still. BUT, kids can definitely appear (and be) hyperactive & impulsive for reasons other than ADHD, such as unreasonable environmental expectations.

    It is a legitimate brain disorder. Specifically, it has to do with difficulty in the prefrontal cortex of the brain, which is related to a broad range of executive functions & self-management skills.

    At the same time, the exact nature of the disorder isn't known, and there is strong belief that the different subtypes of ADHD (e.g., inattention & hyperactivity) are actually 2 separate disorders. So, I think the question is warranted because scientists & psychologists are saying, "This is real," but can't give you an exact explanation of what's happening neurologically, or causes.

    I'm not sure of the latest research, but my sense is that it is over-diagnosed. I base that on my personal experience with kids at medical appointments and seeing what happens in the context of an "evaluation" and "diagnosis," which is often not much more than giving a few rating scales and asking some questions. There is without a doubt a serious problem in the area of diagnosing ADHD, with probably the vast majority of kids having been diagnosed with substandard evaluation procedures.

    In terms of boys vs girls being over-diagnosed, that's a great question - not sure of the latest research.

    With all due respect to the immense awesomeness that is this forum, the forum doesn't really have standing to "feel if it is a legitimate disorder," as the forum is a forum mainly of educators, most of which are not qualified to diagnose or speak professionally about the diagnosis of medical or psychological conditions. Certainly forum members would be within reason to quote research or share experiences, but I don't think a conversation about whether it is a "real disorder" is within the professional scope of practice of most members. My background is in school psychology which is why I am chiming in a bit more :).

    The question of legality is really interesting. There was a discussion here a month or so ago about whether a school district could be expected to pay for medication if a teacher suggested it. Might be worth you looking up. Overall, though, my sense and experience has been that it is not illegal for a school to suggest that a family seek outside medical input as to certain behavioral issues. There is certainly a question as to whether that would come best from a teacher vs. a counselor, administrator, psychologist, etc. There is a also most definitely a difference between suggesting a specific medical treatment (e.g., meds for ADHD) and presenting a clear description of behaviors and suggesting that the pediatrician or other specialist be consulted. It's probably most safe to not use any mention of a specific diagnosis (e.g., "ADHD") and just stick to behaviors observed.

    Dosing for ADHD often happens in stages. There is no real way to know exactly which medicine or which dose will work best or have which side effects. The only way to really know is to test it out and adjust meds over time. So, a parent withdrawing medication after the initial round and not involving the doctor in that process is stepping in and making inappropriate medical decisions. Believe me, I understand the temptation, and I sympathize with your parents, but for those reading this who may be in a current situation, they should be aware that there can be side effects, but with appropriate adjustment those can be minimized in many cases.

    Definitely - yes, sounds like we're on the same page. In terms of diet, I'm not aware of any research that links diet to ADHD symptoms, but I wouldn't be surprised if there were some dietary habits that produced ADHD like symptoms. There are a variety of things (lack of sleep, asthma meds, etc.) that can produce symptoms of hyperactivity & impulsivity, so I wouldn't put it past the possibility of reality.
     
  10. bros

    bros Phenom

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    ADHD is often underdiagnosed in females due to most professionals looking for ADHD Predominantly Hyperactive. The most common in females is Predominantly Inattentive.

    With schools suggesting medications, they aren't allowed to say "Johnny has to take medication before he can come back/get an IEP/do something" because they violates IDEA.

    If you are interested in ADHD, I would suggest signing up for this excellent course on ADHD free of charge from Coursera - https://www.coursera.org/course/adhd

    It already completed, if you sign up, you can view the course archive (aka watch the videos) and learn new stuff about ADHD.
     
  11. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    I have worried that I might be ADD, although I've never been diagnosed. I have trouble concentrating on anything for extended periods of time. As a kid, I constantly found myself distracted or daydreaming and losing blocks of time that the teacher was speaking.

    As far is it being overdiagnosed or just more prevalent now - I heard a theory that kids are simply wired differently now due to the onslaught of media they encounter in their lives. For example - they are often watching TV, texting on their phones, listening to downloaded music, and interacting with their friends - all at the same time. Perhaps that makes them less able to focus and sustain interest in one thing at a time.
     
  12. 2ndTimeAround

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    I know for a fact it is over-diagnosed. My neighbor's child was given a diagnosis and a prescription and never once stepped foot into the doctor's office @@. Just based on Mom's description.

    But I have seen a difference in students when they take their meds or not. And when they are trying new medications/dosages. Maybe it is the placebo effect but there was a marked difference.
     
  13. bros

    bros Phenom

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    If you have decent insurance, see if they'll cover neuropsychological testing
     
  14. microbe

    microbe Comrade

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    My brother had the exact same experiences. :( I'm sorry you had to go through that.

    I found it really strange that teachers would go out of their way to make his life harder. I found it even worse that they let other children bully him, as the children would be particularly malicious. (Boy do I have stories!) He really struggled in school throughout his education.

    Once he graduated high school (he dropped out and went back) he joined the Navy, which has done wonders for his self-esteem. So he's doing much better now. :)

    Thank you for the very detailed post, EdEd. I found it very helpful. :)

    I remember in college that our education law professor told us never to suggest to the parents that their child should be put on medication as it was against the law (I live in Nevada if that helps). For the life of me I can't find the specific law, so maybe the professor was mistaken?

    My parents were always very "anti-medicine." I've tried talking to my father about it, but he's under the impression that there is a medication conspiracy going on with all pharmaceuticals. It concerns me that my brother did not have treatment because of this, and I bet there are a lot of children out there in the same situation.

    After they took him off Ritalin, he kept getting in trouble a lot, of course.

    My parents would let him drink coffee in the mornings and dump white sugar on top of his Cheerios. :lol: I'll look more into the affects of diet on hyperactivity and inattention, though.
     
  15. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Your parents are definitely not alone. And there's probably good reason to be skeptical of a lot of meds.
     
  16. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    I haven't read all the posts.

    I listened to a lecture about ADHD and the MD said that yes, medication can help some kids diagnosed with ADHD. However, by the time the person grows up, the medicine will not have "cured" or fixed any problems. So the time to use meds is when the current experience is so bad that the child is left out or picked on.
     
  17. raynepoe

    raynepoe Companion

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    Both my son and I are diagnosed ADHD. I think that it is a real disorder and medicine (at the right dosage and working with behaviors) can be effective.

    However if a child just takes a pill without behavior modification, they gain impulse control and are able to attend for the day. Where as if you are able to work towards behavioral objectives an ADHD brain can improve and possibly begin to reduce the amount of medicine needed.

    Boys are over diagnosed because the hyperactivity that is usually present is hard to ignore and when poor impulse control is added...it is almost impossible to ignore. On the other hand girls are often ignored, because they tend to just be cluttered and day-dreamy....... however I have read and personally feel that girls with ADHD are at a higher risk of developing depression or indulging in risky behaviors later.... (I personally was a nightmare teenager.....:whistle:)

    Just my :2cents:
     
  18. lenore7188

    lenore7188 Rookie

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    Oh my goodness this reaches my heart. My mother, brother, niece and nephew have been diagnosed with ADHD. In the case of my nephew who has very pronounced ADHD I think medication is the right option. My mother refused to put my brother on medication and he has developed some very good coping skills. In the end it depends on the kid. Everyone is different and ADHD can be different depending on the person. My nephew needed both the medicine and a behavior plan in order to do well.
     
  19. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Exactly what she said...except I have had more boys diagnosed.
     
  20. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    While I agree it's over diagnosed, I wouldn't say I "know for a fact" especially based on one doctor. How the heck a child could be diagnosed and given medicine for a disorder is beyond me and I've never heard of a doctor doing such a thing. I would obviously question the legitimately of that diagnosis and the competency of that doctor.
     
  21. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    I suspect that ADHD is a blanket term for many issues. It took my DD years to allow her DS to be labeled as ADHD. In the meantime, he had some spectacular teachers who worked with his need for exploring everything. Now that he is a teen, his needs have changed, and he is on a very light dose of meds. Those change as his hormones change.
     
  22. ecteach

    ecteach Groupie

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    My son's teacher hinted to me last year that she thinks he might have ADD/Inattentive. I respect her a lot, and it was sort of an "off the record" comment/suggestion. I was sort of shocked at first. But I stepped back and took a look. He is significantly better in reading/comprehension than he is in writing or math. I personally believe that's because you can be thinking about something else and be reading still. You can't really do the same in writing or math at his age. The other day I got his preschool records from the cupboard, and low and behold.....he has been having these attention issues since he was 3. He had trouble putting his coat on at appropriate times, was overly emotional about things, and needed redirection for tactile activities. Sometimes as parents we don't see these things. After-all, he is perfect to me and my husband! I would never do medication, because I feel like he probably has a mild case, if he does have ADD at all. But, I have started doing more attention to task sort of activities with him during the day.
     
  23. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Might be worth talking to his pediatrician about it, or perhaps a developmental neurologist who specializes in learning disabilities.
     
  24. ecteach

    ecteach Groupie

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    I actually did talk to his pediatrician about it. Well, I wrote a note to him during his physical last month. I didn't want my son to hear me talk about his behavior in front of him. I actually got the opposite response from most. The doctor wrote back, "He's just a really smart kid, that's all!"

    I will be keeping track of it.
     
  25. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    That kind of seems like the doctor was blowing you off almost?

    I feel like parents and teachers spend way more time the child than a doctor so their observations and concerns should be very important to the doctor even though he or she is the one who would ultimately make the diagnosis or the referral to a specialist.
     
  26. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Honestly, it seems like the doctor may be blowing you off if he isn't even considering the possibility.

    If you have good insurance, see if you can find a developmental neurologist who specializes in LDs to do a quick evaluation
     
  27. microbe

    microbe Comrade

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    I've often wondered if I have ADD myself since it's so common with the men of my family (maybe us ladies get overlooked)?

    I didn't have the behavioral problems my brother did and I was very quiet in class, so my parents never got involved with my schooling as much. To this day I still have a very hard time focusing on certain tasks, and multi-tasking is utterly impossible for me. While in school and college, if there was a noise or movement, regardless of volume or intensity, I'd lose all concentration and miss the entire lecture.

    Often people will be talking to me and I won't even realize it if I'm doing something else. For example, if I'm on the computer (like right now) and my boyfriend starts talking to me, I won't hear a word he says. It hurts his feelings because he thinks I'm ignoring him, but I'm really not. :( I just don't realize he's talking to me.

    Are these symptoms of ADD or is that normal behavior? I'm entirely not certain. :(
     
  28. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    It's entirely possible microbe. There are actually a range of attentional issues that may or may not be directly related to ADHD, but then again ADHD isn't really a singular construct in terms of cause. The real question is whether you'd benefit from the interventions related to ADHD - meds, self-management interventions, etc. To the extent that you're doing well and fully functional, it's probably a moot point. If you're struggling with those issues, it may well be worth pursuing.
     
  29. microbe

    microbe Comrade

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    Well, I had to teach myself how to focus really really hard as a child, so maybe I already helped myself? :unsure: I've tried getting better about paying attention to my surroundings while focusing, however, but I've noticed no change. My boyfriend mentioned (when I brought this up) that I get really upset when I'm interrupted from reading or doing something attention-intensive. I didn't even realize I was like that. :lol:

    Unfortunately I'm turning 26 very soon (already off parent's health plan) and I'm too poor for insurance until I get a job that has coverage. I'm still working on being less tunnel-visioned, but I'm not sure if I'm going to get any results. Should I consider seeing a specialist when I can afford it?
     
  30. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    I think that's probably a personal decision on your part, based largely off of whether you see the value in a professional opinion/treatment for whatever it will cost you. I do think it's entirely possible that there is medication available that might help you focus more, but it's definitely not guaranteed - even if you end up with a formal diagnosis of ADHD, meds aren't effective with everyone, and there can be side effects.

    I guess if it were me and I had the money/insurance to do so, I would pursue the next step and get more info on my options. If I ended up taking meds and not liking it, I could always make the decision to discontinue. It sounds like it's significant enough that you're curious about additional options, so it may be worth exploring?
     
  31. FourSquare

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    I have a student diagnosed ADHD. He was on meds for 2 years and his teachers swear that those were his best years in school. Mom pulled him off the meds at the end of last year (before I got him this year) because she didn't like the way they changed his personality. Personally, I think she did not experiment with the dosage enough. It is heartbreaking trying to watch him focus. I have done my best to adjust my teaching and help him cope, but I am not medicine.
     
  32. alioxenfree

    alioxenfree Rookie

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    I was diagnosed with ADHD as an adult but the signs were always there. As a child I was considered spacy and eccentric (I still am :D). Some signs were distractibility, inattentiveness, not recognizing danger, impulsivity (destroying/defacing things, being exceptionally mouthy), almost getting kicked out of school, losing things, forgetting things (when I was a child I forgot my shoes!), and when I got older, car accidents...

    This sounds just like me. I've even missed out in dates because of it! I have hurt more than one guy's feelings because I didn't hear what he asked me because I sometimes hear things on a delay. It was so bad that my friends kept telling me I needed to get my hearing checked because I was always saying, "huh?" so I had my hearing checked, twice! My hearing is fine. After talking more about the circumstances under which I couldn't "hear", the audiologist suggested that I might have ADHD and that I have developed coping mechanisms. I didn't think much more about it but the "hearing problem" and forgetfulness continued so I decided to get neuropsychological testing done and was diagnosed with ADHD by the first doctor and when I got a second opinion.

    There were so many things I was doing repeatedly that I thought were normal, like leaving my keys in the door or forgetting my laundry was in the washer or dryer and then wondering where my shirt was. I had to rewash loads of clothes because I forgot they were in the washer and they would stink! The worst part is I didn't learn from these experiences, so if I couldn't find a shirt, I wouldn't automatically look for it in the washer or dryer, even though I'd found them there numerous times before.

    I was functioning pretty well (could keep a job and do well, learned to control my body and mouth, tried hard to focus on what people were saying which was so hard for me because I can't ignore distractions). What I found after I started on medication was that trying to focus, always monitoring what I was saying (to the point where I was reluctant to say anything in many situations), and always coming up with new coping strategies was hard and took a lot of my energy. It was soooo hard! The medication helps me focus and calms my mind so I'm not thinking of so many things at once. I'm still pretty hyper though :)! A few weeks after I started the medication, I was meeting with a co-worker and I realized that I was listening to every word she said. It was so noticeable! I also haven't had any car accidents since I began taking the medication :clap:. The dose that's higher than the dosage that I'm on now made me feel too calm and I wasn't hungry at all, so my doctor brought me back down to my current dose.

    I can so relate, I haaaaaaaate being interrupted! That's another thing that I don't have as much a problem with now when I take my medicine.

    Microbe, I agree with Ed that if you are concerned about it, you should get tested. That way you can find out one way or another and if you do have ADHD, determine what to do from there.

    I'm laughing as I proofread this post because it's so long (sorry!). It's the kind of post that would make my eyes glaze over ;).
     
  33. Shanoo

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    I haven't read the full thread, so forgive me if I'm repeating something.

    At the end of last year, we had Grade level meetings and one of the things we discussed was the high level of students who are diagnosed ADD or ADHD. What we were told by Mental Health was that often times kids are misdiagnosed with ADD or ADHD when really they should be on the Autism spectrum, either with Aspergers or high functioning Autism.
     
  34. EdEd

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    alioxenfree - that was such and interesting an helpful post. I think it's so interesting when adults who have particular difficulties share their personal experiences. I think it helps us all understand a bit more and relate to what's going on.
     
  35. Special-t

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    Jul 5, 2013

    I actually think this is the case with one of my students. At this point it's not worth reassessing because his services would not change a d be will be graduating soon.
     
  36. alioxenfree

    alioxenfree Rookie

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    Jul 5, 2013

    Thanks, EdEd! :)
     
  37. microbe

    microbe Comrade

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    Jul 6, 2013

    Yes, thank you, alioxenfree. That was very helpful. :)
     
  38. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Jul 6, 2013

    Holy crap. That's me to a T. I've always wondered if I was ADD. And then I wondered if I just thought I was ADD because hey, everyone else is, too, and there's actually nothing wrong, maybe I just never learned how to pay attention. It's kind of a merry-go-round in my head.

    Thank you for that post, alioxenfree. I can relate to an awful lot of it. My biggest issue, I think, is overstimulation. If I even start thinking about all of the things I need to do, I shut down.
     
  39. Aussiegirl

    Aussiegirl Habitué

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    Jul 6, 2013

    This has been a very interesting thread. Alioxenfree - thank you for a coherent explanation of your world (which is the world so many folks are in). My DH was diagnosed with ADD as an adult, my kids all are diagnosed with ADHD or ADD. I would say I also would probably be diagnosed with ADD based on what I've experienced at home and what I've read here.

    Diet: My niece was diagnosed as severely ADHD. She never went on meds. She ate a fairly strict diet (nothing with food coloring, preservatives, etc.) and was raised in a fairly regimented family. The structure was a plus for sure.

    My one child was definitely affected by certain foods - esp. hot dogs. Totally different reaction to hot dogs containing no color, preservatives, etc. Looked gross, but tasted good.

    Each has developed his/her own coping techniques - some with meds, some with meds and behavior therapy. They are all adults now. Two still use meds so they can focus at work. I have definitely changed my views on meds, even though I did with my children. As a teacher, they are a God-send, but I hate when the kids are overdosed and are groggy in the morning, ok in the middle and on rebound at the end of the day. Many parents don't realize that puberty greatly affects how the meds work. This is true for children with diabetes as well.

    With my students, if I have a kid forget his/her meds and use it as an excuse, I have a quiet talk with them and tell them not to use it as an excuse, that all my children have it to one degree or another and that they just had to work harder the days they didn't take the meds and that I expect the same of him/her. I also suggest taping a reminder to their door, bathroom mirror, etc. to remember to take the med. Granted, I have 13-14 yr. old students. This probably wouldn't work for little guys.

    I've given kids with severe ADHD permission to get out of their seats - they can pace the back of the room while they read if they can't sit still, I've suggested that if they are really having a tough time sitting still or need to move to stay alert, that they go to the back of the room to get a tissue. I've taught all my students various "wake up" movements they can do without disrupting everyone around them. In addition to all this, I often have my students get up and move during the lesson. For example, I may have them get up and sit at a different group than their own and with different folks than they normally are. This works esp. well with discussions. It often generates different points of view (literally and otherwise :) )

    I also once read that teaching is a great job for someone with ADHD. Makes sense. How many of your peers are diagnosed with ADD/ADHD or strongly feel they have it?
     
  40. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Jul 6, 2013

    I've found this thread very beneficial.

    Question (to anybody who would like to field it): do you feel a student with ADD/ADHD would do better in a VERY structured class, or a class a bit "freer"?

    I just often wonder if a student who has ADD/ADHD who is placed in a "very structured class" would find it very frustrating... restrictive. Or is that actually beneficial for such children?

    Thanks for any input.
     
  41. mrking47968

    mrking47968 Rookie

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    Jul 8, 2013

    Over 14 years of teaching, I'm starting to notice a trend... at least with ADD. Most (and not all) ADD children come from at least one parent that doesn't make them do remedial tasks (like having them tie their shoes). It's not necessarily true in all cases, but lot of ADD children simple need to learn how to think and problem solve for themselves, and not expect others to prompt them. Initiative is a hard thing to teach, and must be developed early.
     
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