ADHD student refused to do a test

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Backroads, Apr 24, 2017.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    I gave a math quiz last Friday. My severely ADHD student was absent that day. Today, when we had the time, I handed him the test and said "Hey, Kiddo, I need you to take this test." Simple enough.

    He threw a monstrous fit. He wrote "I hate you" on the back of the test and showed it to me, then insisted he was here on Friday and already took the test (this is demonstratively false, proof including an e-mail from Mom saying Kiddo was sick and could he turn in his homework on Monday?)

    Gah. So, consequences administered and all that, including a potentially permanent 0 for the test (data necessary thing for administration), though we might try again tomorrow.

    There is nothing in his IEP about changing the time of the test or anything like that. Did I do wrong in waiting until the afternoon to ask him to do the test? Do I accept this as a one-time bit of brattiness or is it something I should bring to the attention of the IEP team, looking for a plan for giving him make-up tests, finding when the best time is, etc?
     
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  3. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    One-time bit of brattiness is what I'd go with. Document EVERYTHING, including making a copy of the back of the test. I also would have sent a copy home. I wouldn't tiptoe around him in the future if I didn't have to.
     
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  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I'm thinking he may have forgotten about the test until he was confronted with it. I try to remember to remind kids when they come in first thing in the morning that they have a test to make up at such-and-such a time. I have a couple of students with diagnosed anxiety disorders and this seems to help them most of the time. If they do have an outburst, I try to treat it as a one-off, document, and move on. I'm fortunate in that I have the professional discretion to not have to give a zero and can just find another way to evaluate.
     
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  5. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    Probably best to involve a conversation with mum. I'd tend to agree that you may have caught the kid on a bad day. He could have felt ambushed that the test was 'sprung' on him and his response was to get defensive.

    Could also be helpful to ask the kid to give you a time when he thinks is best for him to sit his test, within reason of course. Sometimes giving the kid some form of choice makes them feel empowered and he may look a bit more favourably on the test.
     
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  6. nstructor

    nstructor Cohort

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  7. nstructor

    nstructor Cohort

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    What grade do you teach?
     
  8. bros

    bros Phenom

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    This was the thought that popped into my head, that he forgot about it until it was sprung on him.
     
  9. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    I would have mentioned it to him before dropping it in his lap. You could have then mentioned that there was free time available and he could take it now or he could suggest another time.
     
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  10. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    2nd. This particular kid is emotionally a preschooler, so things can be tricky with him.
     
  11. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    Good grief. It wasn't really sprung on him since I'm assuming it wasn't a surprise quiz given on Friday (so the means it was coming at some point). I'd give him one more chance tomorrow (maybe email mom to remind him about it) and if he pulls the same nonsense then a 0.
     
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  12. Teachis4m3

    Teachis4m3 Rookie

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    Something is going on.
    A kid might be labeled with ADHD now but later we'll find out a host of other things he may have been dealing with.
    Above all else! Document!
    How well is your district in handling these issues? Do you have someone who sees this child regularly, like a full time counselor?
    Concerning the back of his test:
    You know the parent best, would sending a copy of the back of the test help or hurt or could it go either way?
     
  13. Teachis4m3

    Teachis4m3 Rookie

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    I would give opportunities to make this up but I would need to rearrange the questions a bit.
    If the student ever discovers that he can get more time this way, and possibly cheat, he might develop a pattern of behavior that would be extremely hard to train out of.
     
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  14. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    We're a charter school. He just barely received his IEP and has yet to have any real pull-outs (he's fine academically). However, he does see a private therapist three times a week.

    Mom and Dad are pretty much the best, so I did show them the back of the test.
     
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  15. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    I agree.
     
  16. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Can you give a kid an IEP for extreme ADD? I've been told no at my school, although it can severely affect performance.
     
  17. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    If students are getting zeros for not being able to do the work then it is impacting their academics. Test scores can no longer be the sole indicator in evaluation for IEPs.
     
  18. TeachDW

    TeachDW Rookie

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    I think you should raise your concern to the IEP team. Another step that you could take is to take with the parents of the child. In our school, they make special arrangements for ADHD students because things get out of control inside the classroom most of the time.
    Is it the first time he threw a fit like that?
     
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  19. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    First time over an assignment.
     
  20. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    If it's medical and disabling with another learning disability (which he has), yes. I've seen it before. We also suspect he has some other emotional issues yet to be properly diagnosed.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2017
  21. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    could he possibly be on the spectrum?
     
  22. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    In my experience, many kids with ADHD end up qualifying for special ed under the Other Health Impairments category.
     
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  23. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    We have many children who will do this, especially during standardized testing, who do not have an ADHD blanket to shelter under. Many do it because it gives them a sense of great power over adults, or as a way to lash out at the society that marginalizes them—I assume.

    Never in all my years could have imagined children were damaged in such varied and profound ways.
     
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  24. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    My first impression is that this is not ADD related, except possibly for the impulsiveness of the reaction. Although another ADD related possibility, (I'd say unlikely but possible), is a sudden imaginary fear concerning the test, as sometimes ADD children develop imaginary fears. I'm kind of wondering if the incident is more of a minor issue than it appears on the surface to adults. I agree with your response of not allowing the outburst and informing the parents; I probably would try to avoid it becoming a major issue. When one of my students throws a fit, I like to invoke my rule that I will listen when they speak as politely to me as I speak to them.

    A really good book, no, the best book I've read on dealing with meltdowns is by Daniel Siegel and Tina Bryson; No-Drama Discipline: The Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind. New York: Bantam, 2014. E-book ISBN is 978-0-345-54805-4.
     
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  25. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    It wouldn't surprise me. Again, parents are great, but they're also the natural type and while happy with taking him to a therapist, are shying away from checking out that sort of diagnosis.
     
  26. Teachis4m3

    Teachis4m3 Rookie

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    Mom and Dad are struggling with it as well.
    The other students will instinctively know, or will cognitively grasp, that there is something unique about this student and I doubt the behaviors will be duplicated by any others.
    You certainly got this!
    Hopefully he gets the extra help and its great that it is being identified in grade 2. We are getting students in grade 8 that there has been parents begging for testing of their students for years and there has been huge documentation of behavioral issues.
     
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  27. Teachis4m3

    Teachis4m3 Rookie

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    I am going to read this. Thank you.
     
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  28. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    So Day 2/3 (Monday and Yesterday), and no test is done. Monday was the official try-again day, Tuesday was unfinished work spring cleaning where I unofficially turned a blind eye if he so happened to pull out the test and complete it.

    Parents and administration are at peace with the zero.
     
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  29. TeachDW

    TeachDW Rookie

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    As much as possible, we don't want them secluded with other students but sometimes, things can be really hard to handle.
    As a teacher, you need total support from the parents. What do you usually do when he's acting like that?
     
  30. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    I have a sweet student who never completes any work. The kid will sit there quietly and just stare at the paper (despite prompting, timers, strategies, etc). On a good day, the kid can complete the work with no problem, but about 80% of the time the work does not get done. I have talked to the parents and my admin and am now just giving zeros. It actually is a relief to come to peace with the fact that sometimes, that's okay. You can't make a child do something they don't want to do.
     
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  31. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    But sadly everyone csn give up on the child because the underlying csuse is difficult to determine, and ifvthe available services don't do it it is easier to give up on the child and blame the child for his problems.
     
  32. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    I've pushed things as far as I can push them, and trust me, I have really tried to get this student some help. If there is no admin or parent support for getting special ed services (my school is very anti SpEd and will basically only test if the parents demand it), at some point these children have to be allowed to fail to show in a concrete way that what's happening in the classroom currently is not working.
     
  33. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Generally just give a consequence and carry on with teaching, keeping Mom in the loop.
     
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  34. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    I don't know if Otter's example is giving up. More like the natural end of a phase of approach. Now she has concrete proof what she can do with x,y, and z isn't working. Until she gets other things, here's where things are.

    And while it's our job to help the kid, I think some kids truly learn to think they have no skin in the game. Concrete failure is good there.
     
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  35. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    It is only a natural progression of what those at the school are willing to give. It is far from what could be done. I don't mean otterpop because clearly the school's decisions are lacking.
     
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  36. TeachDW

    TeachDW Rookie

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    I think that's reasonable. As for me, the parents agreed that I will treat their child how I treat the other students. It means that when he has done inappropriate, he needs to face the consequences of his actions. In that way, he'll learn that he should be responsible for his actions. However, not all parents are okay with this setup. Most of them would like to have their children treated extra special.
     

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