ADHD and Eligibility?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by sunbeachgirl, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. sunbeachgirl

    sunbeachgirl Rookie

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    Aug 17, 2012

    I have a question about eligibility: If a student is diagnosed with ADHD and receives good grades (As and Bs) and scores Advanced on state assessments, should they qualify for Special Education?
     
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  3. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    I'd say no. There has to be an adverse affect to their educational performance to qualify as a disability. That performance is not adversely affected by the diagnosis, IMO. That said, we have had a lot of students qualify with only ADHD as a diagnosis, but did have worse performance.
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I would say no as well. There's no educational need. Now, they could qualify as 504.
     
  5. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Aug 17, 2012

    I don't think they should. Sometimes, I've seen the kids with ADHD with good academic skills receive help with a 504. Usually, that means extended time or small group settings.
     
  6. ecteach

    ecteach Groupie

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    How are his/her social skills?
     
  7. ecteach

    ecteach Groupie

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    Also, what were his/her results on the educational/psychological? Were there any 15+ discrepancies?
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Aug 17, 2012

    I knew a student with a 45 point discrepancy in 2 areas but had good grades in regular classes and passed state tests and wasn't even allowed a 504. Why? Those lower areas were the very bottom of average instead of low average. This was a gifted kid that was performing no where near potential, struggled for every grade received doing according to mom and child 4+ hours of homework every night in elementary school, but was denied help. Suggestion was to stop the studying, but the problem with that, the homework wouldn't get done and that would be the "excuse" for poor grades and that 45 point discrepancy still wouldn't have mattered.

    So, should a child receive an IEP? According to IDEA, some would say yes if one considered outside factors such as parental support at home and excessive homework to keep up the grades which is a criteria of IDEA but not acceptable at our school without a lawyer or advocate for a parent. Should a student have a 504? Probably, especially if he or she is medicated because with the new disability laws, imact of medication or developed skills that mitigate symptoms cannot be used to deny a 504. So, if medicated a student does well, a 504 with accommodations is still warranted.
     
  9. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 17, 2012

    In Florida, ADHD alone isn't sufficient to qualify for ESE services. If he/she doesn't qualify on some other basis, it doesn't matter if the student is even failing. They are eligible for a 504 plan, however.
     
  10. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Aug 17, 2012

    I'm from Florida, and ADHD is considered an OHI (Other Health Impairment), so kids can get an IEP for it.
    Copied from source:
    Q: Is AD/HD covered under the "Other Health Impaired" category of IDEA?

    A: Yes. According to the U.S. Department of Education, children diagnosed with AD/HD who meet the eligibility criteria under “Other Health Impaired” (OHI) have always been eligible for special education services. While this was clarified by the 1991 Policy Memorandum issued by the U.S. Department of Education, the NEW regulations implementing the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Amendments of 1997, issued March 12, 1999, for the first time explicitly incorporate AD/HD within the definition of “Other Health Impaired”.



    Q: What are the criteria for eligibility for special education under the OHI category due to AD/HD?

    A: In order for a student to qualify for special education under the OHI category, the following criteria must be met: a) the student must be diagnosed with AD/HD by the school district, or the school must accept the diagnosis rendered by another qualified professional; b) the AD/HD must result in limited alertness to academic tasks, due to heightened alertness to environmental stimuli; c) the effects of the AD/HD must be chronic (long-lasting) or acute (have a substantial impact); d) this must result in an adverse effect on educational performance; e) the student must require special education services in order to address the AD/HD and its impact.

    Citation: http://www.childadvocate.net/adhd_and_idea.htm

    Some districts try to say kids with ADHD can't have IEPs, though.
     
  11. sunbeachgirl

    sunbeachgirl Rookie

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    Aug 17, 2012

    Student has above average/superior intelligence. He was depressed roughly 4 years ago when his parents were going through a divorce. Mother claims he has social anxiety (but according to him he doesn't and he has many friends and plays sports). She wants an IEP to help him stay organized and wants the school to keep track of his homework.
     
  12. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    We would have to prove some sort of education impact. I did have a student last year that got an IEP for ADHD despite performing at the just below average range in class. They were able to prove that the student's natural ability/intelligence should correlate to extremely high performance in school, so even though he wasn't "low" it was still having an educational impact.
     
  13. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Aug 18, 2012

    The student would qualify under OHI. Psychological and educational testing scores can back it up.

    Just because the student does well in class doesn't mean they don't have issues (like executive functioning issues, very common in ADHD students)

    Does the student have issues with organization? Then it has an educational impact and the student needs an IEP. Social anxiety is a medical diagnosis and it would be good if the parent were to get a more up to date checkup with a psychologist on that front. The student could still have anxiety, just not social anxiety.

    Yep.

    Also, organization issues can qualify one for an IEP.

    If the parents aren't demanding a huge amount of services, why not just keep the kid on the IEP, it won't hurt.
     
  14. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Aug 18, 2012

    OHI - other health impared.

    No disability in and of itself qualified for an IEP. There must be educational impact. The issue becomes how does a school define educational impact. Some see it as failing subjects AND state tests. Some determine organizational issues are purely CHOICE and therefore any impact of that is because the student doesn't want to do what he is supposed to do (I see this rational often in my school).

    So, it is possible with proper twisting of the meaning of educational impact to eliminate almost every disabiltiy except the most severe from having an IEP. Inflate grades, ignore issues or blame the student, etc the school can make just about anything not qualify for an IEP if they want. That works until the parent gets a lawyer, but some schools depend on parents not knowing enough or having the money for a lawyer (Thankfully most schools are not this bad, but there are some.)
     
  15. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Aug 18, 2012

    Several years ago I had a 3rd grader with ADHD, he also had a low IQ. As I understand it, SpecEd didn't want to qualify him as LD because he was working to his potential. Mom got a letter from his Dr. stating that he was ADHD & that it impacted his learning. We were able to qualify him as OHI.
     
  16. 521cat

    521cat New Member

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    Aug 18, 2012

    It sound like this student would be best served with either a 504 plan or a SAP (Student Assistant Plan). A 504 is a legal document and will help with some classroom accommodations and testing accommodations. A SAP is not a legal document but is usually follwed by the teacher. It gives the student some classroom modifications such as those that the mom wants but does not allow for testing accommodations.
     

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