Activities to do with magazines

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Ms.Jasztal, Aug 1, 2007.

  1. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Aug 1, 2007

    I have GREAT magazines- OWL, American Girl, Boy's Life, Ranger Rick, TIME for Kids, Weekly Reader, and lots of good old Scholastic stuff. I'll even have Storyworks this year.

    Now, I've decided to make a list of activities kids can do when looking through magazines. I don't always want them doing the same thing, and I desire this to be enriching because it's for fourth grade advanced reading. Please help out if you can... because with what I've done this summer, I'm beginning to wind down. :help:
     
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  3. Miss_J

    Miss_J Habitué

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    When I was in 5th we would take an article and use a hand to retell it. On the palm they wrote the name of the article. On each finger they answered the basic question (who, what, where, when, why)

    I'm not sure if this is exactly what you were looking for.
     
  4. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Aug 2, 2007

    Thank you for contributing, anyway. All contributions of course are appreciated. What I am specifically seeking are activities that can be completed in a center. :) I really thank you, though.
     
  5. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    How about something like, "create a new headline for the article" or "why do you think the publishers chose these pictures for the article?" Have them identify the contributors of a magazine by looking in the front. Who is the editor, writers, photographers, etc. Have them write about what each does.

    I can't think of anything else.
     
  6. happyteacher

    happyteacher Rookie

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    How about...

    an "interesting word" search? Maybe create a short list of words such as "said, then, after, "etc and have the students find alternate words that were used in an article.

    Or write an alternate ending to a story.

    Do a critic's review of a story. 2 thumbs up etc and why

    Research the author.

    That's all that is coming to mind at this late hour!
     
  7. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Language activity- Identify the _____ thru out the story. (part of speech chosen)
    Writing- Write a summary of the article. Time line the events of the story. Create an additional character or new problem and recreate the story. Create a new/your own ending.
    Math- ??Count the number of syllables in each sentence? How many Paragraphs? How many characters? Allow the student to turn a timer on and read until the timer goes off. What LINE, or where in the passage did they read to?
    Crafty- create a paper character/ draw a scene
     
  8. Touchthefuture

    Touchthefuture Comrade

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    Time For Kids has so many activities you can do with each issue. They are on the website. Also, there are 4-5 generic things they offer which may apply to the other magazines. They are things like word hunts, finding parts of an article (title), etc. Have you seen those? What about a mini book report?
     
  9. shortee

    shortee Companion

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    Ms. Jasztal-I'd love to do something like that in my class too...anything you've come up with so far that you'd be willing to share?
     
  10. Scout About

    Scout About Rookie

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    Yes, the Time for Kids website is exactly what I was going to mention. Tons of fabulous graphic organizers.

    One good center activities that I like for newspapers and magazines is to have kids cut out a photograph that looks interesting, then write their own caption and news story to go along with it.
     
  11. iheart5thgrade

    iheart5thgrade Comrade

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    Language Arts ideas- Students can cut out magazine pictures and glue speech bubbles to the picture. They then fill in the bubbles with whatever topic you've told them...(ex multiple meaning words)

    Also, they can cut out pictures, glue to paper, and write adjectives describing the picture along the outside

    Math- Cut out items with prices from a store flier and write how many of each they can get with a specific amount of money....

    Not sure if you were wanting to cut apart your magazines, or if you were wanting to keep them!!! Anyways, hope this helps!
     
  12. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    I thought of:
    - Who, what, when, where, why (which I've done many times and want to inspire Gifted kids to go beyond that)
    - Cutting out the text features and making a poster about the different text features "featured" in an article (it has to be a magazine I want the students to cut up, though- multiple copies I have of Weekly Reader (like 10 for each) is ok))
    - Cutting out a photo from an article and coming up with new captions for that photo

    Hmm, I'm getting there... I guess. Thank you for all your contributions already! I'll make a sheet covering some favorites from each of you.
     
  13. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    What about scavenger hunts -- you predetermine which magazines, and have them find whatever you want. Stories about soldiers in Iraq, Pictures by a specific photographer, Quotes from the President (nookueler), who is the publisher, etc. Just a thought -- I get the heebiejeebies when I think of my magazines being torn up, lol!
     
  14. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Does your state assessment have open-ended responses? Writing captions is a great way to teach summarization and incorporating meaningful quotes that would tie in with those type questions.
     
  15. jeanie

    jeanie Companion

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    Last year, I had a center called "Magazine Detective." The kids could choose any one of the old Ranger Rick, National Geo for Kids, Our Big Backyard, etc. Their job was to fill in a sheet to make a report on one of the articles in the magazine.
    It was their choice... which magazine, which article. The sheet I created was sort of fill in the blank with lines... a question, and then lines for them to write an answer. I have the sheet at school, but basically it asked for:
    Your name
    Date
    name of the magazine
    month /year of the magazine
    Name of the article
    Author (sometimes there was no author listed!)
    Page number
    What was the article mostly about? ( or maybe it said "what animal plant or person was featured in the article?"
    What is one interesting thing you learned?
    Why did you choose this article?
    Who would you recommend this article to?

    The Magazine Detective was one of the most popular centers! They could visit the center no more than once a week. I was glad that
    the magazines were finally getting used. As an evaluation , I read and added comments or questions. In the beginnning of the year, the answers were pretty simplistic, sometimes just one word answers... but by the end of the year, the responses were thoughtful and usually more than one or two sentences long. I am definitely having the same center this year.
     
  16. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Yes. Thank you! :cool:

    And PWHatley... I would never do anything frightening to a magazine. :woot: But having 92 copies of one Weekly Reader... it may not hurt to cut from... one. :up: :clap: :oops:
     
  17. Mommy2wad

    Mommy2wad Rookie

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    I teach third grade--this idea would be great for teaching non-fiction reading comprehension. This is one thing that is difficult to teach to third graders. I love the idea and plan on sharing it with my team!
     
  18. Mommy2wad

    Mommy2wad Rookie

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    Ooh, I love this idea too. Thanks Ms. Jasztal for asking for suggestions on integrating magazines into your classroom. I have gotten two great ideas!
     
  19. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jeanie, I too love your idea! Pretty basic, but a good idea since I have the Owl, Ranger Rick, and the like.

    Now, I need to start a forum on how you store your magazines! :lol:
     
  20. ancientcivteach

    ancientcivteach Habitué

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    Here are some ideas I might use with my sixth graders:

    How about researching/writing a rebuttal? Choose an article/editorial and write an opposing response?

    Write a fictional story using the facts in the article or using the article as a setting. Or a slightly different twist on this idea:

    Write a point of view story as an animal, plant, artifiact you've read about. Describe your life/journey using facts from the article.

    Find ____ articles on the same topic. What facts do they all agree on? Why are some facts mentioned in one article and others not?

    With your environmental magazines - write a public service announcement (1 - 2 minutes) to educate the public about a danger to the environment (or endangered species, or conservation tip) - you could even have them record it. With the news magazines they could record a short news broadcast. Spoken media is a different genre.

    Speaking of genre - why not recycled stories (sometimes called genre reformulation) ? They could summarize their article using the rhythm/rhyme scheme of familiar story books such as Brown Bear, Brown Bear or If you give a mouse a cookie.

    With the Scholastics - maybe they could do some mapping activities? Provide blank world, usa maps and the students have to map the important locations and annotate what happenned there? Dramatize a historical article by writing a short monologue about what happened as the main character or a skit with a partner. (That might be too loud for a center . . . maybe a pantomime or tableau ;) )

    Just some ideas :)
     
  21. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jeannie,
    Cool activity! What grade do you teach?

    Ancientcivteach:
    As always, great ideas! If I do get to teach in 5th grade, the kids should be able to at least do some of them!
     
  22. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Thanks for all of these fantastic ideas... I am going to use Scholastic News and WR Science this year for the first time as part of guided reading. These will be great things for the rest of the class to do, or for early finishers!!
     
  23. Gopher4

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    I subscribe to Time For Kids for each student and then I have classroom issues of National Geographic Kids, Zoobooks and Sports Illustrated for Kids. I type up Scavenger Hunts. I may ask for them to write the title of 2 articles, a subtitle, caption, define words in certain articles using context clues, then I may have them choose one article to read and answer questions to. They usually do this independently or with a partner. They really become familiar with the nonfiction conventions found in magazines. I do it mostly at the beginning of the year. I do the same thing for our S.S. newspaper.
     
  24. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Wow, this topic has grown. :) This year, I plan on subscribing to Storyworks from Scholastic for 10 copies a month. We already get Weekly Reader.
     
  25. njeledteacher

    njeledteacher Cohort

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    Storyworks is awesome. There's a lot of great things you can do with them. I wish more schools would subscribe to it, or at least order enough for one class on each grade level...though I think it is a little pricey. They have Reader's Theatre, and articles that help with state assessments.
     
  26. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    I have to get the subscription out of the $250 I receive for my classroom @ the beginning of the year.
     
  27. njeledteacher

    njeledteacher Cohort

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    How much do they cost?
     
  28. sunfl3815

    sunfl3815 Rookie

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    Storyworks is great!! They have tons of online activities that accompany the stories each month. There are different graphic organizers, quizzes, etc.

    I'll have students rewrite the ending to stories in magazines.

    Make their own comprehension quiz (with answer key) for a friend.

    Make a book jacket with a summary on the back after reading a story.
     
  29. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Write a letter to the editor about one of the articles in the magazine. You might need to find some good examples, but they could take this any way they choose. It could be a compliment or a complaint letter.

    Look at the title, subtitle, pictures, illustrations and captions. Write 3 things you expect to find out in the article (questions). After you read the article answer the questions. If you didn't find the answer, do some research to answer your question. If all of your original questions were answered, make up 2 new questions to research.
     
  30. Canteacher

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    What about a top ten list? Students could create "The top ten most interesting things that I learned about..." based on an article.
     
  31. Scout About

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    I thought of something else I do quite frequently with non-fiction. Apologies if it's already been mentioned. A 3-2-1 chart. 3 facts you learned, 2 interesting ideas, and 1 question you have about the topic. It's perfect for centers because there is no prep, except for having the charts copied. The kids can use any non-fiction book they are currently reading (or your magazines, of course!).
     

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