Acing the Interview

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by teacher304, Aug 10, 2011.

  1. teacher304

    teacher304 Companion

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    Aug 10, 2011

    I have been lucky enough to have been given the opportunity to interview several times.

    I guess I am having a hard time selling myself and standing out amongst the other ten or so candidates that they are bringing in. (In my area alot of people are interviewed)

    Friends and family have given me mock interviews and they say my answers are perfect and they don't understand why I haven't gotten any offers.

    Advice/tips on how to stand out in such tough competition esp those with more experience.

    I always wear a suit and research the school and try to prove why I'm the best for them.
     
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  3. NikkiT

    NikkiT Rookie

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    Aug 10, 2011

    In my area there aren't many opportunities. So, I probably haven't gotten as much practice as teacher304, but I'd really like some help with this, too!

    I went to an interview on Monday and in talking to the other five or so candidates waiting with me, found that I was the only one to have ever had my own classroom before. However, no calls back...and they said they'd let you know by today (Wed.). Now, I wasn't too hopeful about this anyway, as it seemed to be more of a screening interview--they probably interviewed at least 75 people that day--BUT--What can I do to stand out?

    I always say that I wish my mom could go in and do the interview part for me. She just has one of those personalities that everyone loves her immediately. I am just a bit more of a reserved person...it is hard for me to come off as super bubbly right off the bat...I feel like it seems too fake. I just am beginning to feel like those are the people that get hired, though (the naturally bubbly people).

    Any administrators--please help me! Please tell the first words that come to mind when you think of the last few people that you've hired. I feel like that enthusiasm/wit is the "it" factor that principals speak of, but I usually need to warm up to people before I can joke around with them so much. I practice for interviews, but I want a job so much that I can't help but be a little nervous during the real thing. Have you ever hired someone that isn't as "bubbly", but just really shows her passion for teaching?

    Thanks for your help. :love:
     
  4. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Aug 10, 2011

    committed, knowledgeable, friendly, sincere

    Those are the words that I think of when I think of our new hires.
     
  5. NikkiT

    NikkiT Rookie

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    Aug 10, 2011

    Any other tips, TeachinTexas? I think that I am all of those things, but I must not be doing something right. Did they do/say anything specifically that made them stand out so much? For example, are they people that joked with you right away or told some kind of special, personal story? Does somebody that is extremely outgoing automatically trump someone that is dedicated, passionate, and hardworking--but a little more reserved? I'm much more outgoing and "bubbly" with the kids, but as I've said, I have a very hard time being like this right away with administrators.
     
  6. Geauxtee

    Geauxtee Comrade

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    Aug 10, 2011

    The Ebooks on in the A to Z store have great interview questions and answers
     
  7. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Aug 10, 2011

    There were definitely more bubbly people than we actually chose to be hired. The first hire was a person that had done some substituting in the district and had helped with tutoring struggling students during the school day. She had no teaching experience. We knew of her because she worked in our school. She won the job because we already knew her work ethic, knew the programs that we used, was well liked by the members of the team, and had shown her knowledge of data collection, and keeping careful notes on the students progress.

    The 2nd candidate was a bright, energetic, think out of the box character. I say character because the person was quirky and maybe even a little odd. BUT the person was honest, extremely bright, knowledgeable about the subject matter, had student taught in the grade level, had excellent references, and just stood out as someone that children would be drawn to immediately.

    They both stood out in different ways. They were both new teachers and beat out many experienced teachers because of their knowledge of CURRENT mathematical teaching practices. The experienced teachers were very traditional in their thinking. They could not get past the skill and drill/worksheet mentality. It made me feel bad because I have experience and I am NOT that way. You really have to stay current on the craft of teaching. I actually went into the process of looking for new applicants WANTING someone with experience because the team they would be on already had some fairly inexperienced teachers. We thought bringing in some seasoned teachers would be a help to the team. Well, as it turned out, the best persons for THESE jobs did not have experience.
     
  8. NikkiT

    NikkiT Rookie

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    Aug 10, 2011

    Thank you so much for your help! It makes me feel a little better to get some ideas as to what makes the selected candidates stand out. I actually only had my own classroom for one year and did some long-term subbing the year before that. I just got my M.A.T the year prior to that. I got my B.S. in Asian Studies in 2006 and taught English in Japan the year after that. So, I feel like I do have a pretty unique profile. Also, my full-time teaching job was with a district that had SmartBoards in every room, etc--so I think that b/w that and having just finished grad school in 2009, I am still quite up-to-date and into hands-on learning and all of that.

    I guess I'll just have to really network and try and force myself to be a little more outgoing. I know the job market is more competitive everywhere, but it is so much more competitive here than the state that I worked in last year. I am going to teach some classes for kids at a local community center this fall. Hopefully, I can get some tutoring jobs from this and meet some parents with connections!

    Thank you again for the advice. This forum really helps me. If anyone has anymore advice, please share!
     

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