about to blow

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by wsrecords, Oct 16, 2006.

  1. wsrecords

    wsrecords Rookie

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    Oct 16, 2006

    :eek: I am on the verge of...I dont know. I have been teaching special ed. in a lower income school district for 3 years in Ohio. The students I work with are CD, SLD, ADHD, and ED. I am honestly fed up with paper work, rehular ed. teachers who just want my kids out, and the demands that my students MUST be like every other student. This is making me want to leave the only profession I have ever wanted to do. I know those of you who may read this may not have the answers, but I was wondering if anyone else feels this way (or has) and what you did about it? I really am on the verge of a breakdown! :eek:
     
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  3. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Oct 16, 2006

    I have never had to do all the paper work. I was only a one on one aide. But I understand about the regular ed classroom teachers not wanting the students in their room. At the start of one year, a teacher was like I don't think these students should be in this room. So on and so on. But by the end of the year, she loved having them in there. They just need someone (which can't be you, you don't have time) to show them that these students have feelings, and can be really caring and so on.
    Best of luck to you. I hope some one else has better advice.
    Don't give up these students need you!
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Oct 17, 2006

    I'm with ya...our annual IEPs (all of them) go home today (Tuesday). As of Monday morning, I still hadn't received the information that I needed from one of the classroom teachers. I needed to have his long-range plans for the term (so that I could write language and math modifications) and whether those identified students who do not come out to me for resource help are working at grade level with accommodations or if they need modifications to their program. When I asked about it at the end of the day, the response was something like this, "I don't know about not on grade level, I teach grade _____ and that's what they get. I haven't done my reading and writing diagnostics yet so I dont' know grade level. I'm just following the text book in math." I know that this teacher does not want to deal with modifications in the classroom. I was at school until almost 8:30 last night writing IEPs that probably won't even be read, much-the-less followed. Arghhh!!!!!

    Deep breath...sorry for going off like that...I understand all too well your frustration.
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Oct 17, 2006

    I am severely hard of hearing and the only modifications I required was to sit up front and have the teacher look at me (and not give me filmstrips without words). That was a major deal for many teachers. Not only could they not do it, but they were resentful about it. Of course, I had really good teachers that went beyond that modification into making me feel at home, comfortable and restated what the students said as well.
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Oct 17, 2006

    And that's how it always should be!
     
  7. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Oct 17, 2006

    I guess my point was I didn't think my modifications were that hard. I didn't require an interpreter (I got one in college) or that the materials be redone in any way. I just needed them to look at me. If many people weren't willing to do that ONE simple thing (I can overlook filmstrips by not doing the worksheet) then I am not a bit surprised that they can't handle more challenging things. I will say that since my time, people with disabilities in general have gotten more exposure and general education teachers have more training (or at least exposure) than they did at that time. I always find it sad though that we STILL have to force things to happen. It can't happen just becuase the law says it should. It can't happen becuase it is the right thing to do. It has to be FORCED (if education and exposure doesn't work). THat's a bold statement to make but that's from someone who STILL has to not only show people what the ADA law says to get an interpreter but has to FIGHT for one in many areas of the country. THe law and my word isn't good enough. Oops...wrong forum. HA! I guess you can see I understand your frustrations (in a different perspective). Keep on truckin on and my philosophy is that we are changing people's perspectives ONE person at a time. (for you that means ONE teacher at a time). As far as paperwork goes...try imagining being 30 weeks pregnant and STILL having to fight hospital LAWYERS for an interpreter. I won. You are frustrated but you also sound PASSIONATE. I have moments when I give up too (and it's all about me) but eventually passion heats back up again. Hopefully yours will too. Just remember..you can't change the whole world at once. Working with disabilities is often not about educating THEM but about constantly education OTHERS about people with disabilities. I've always said, my hearing loss isn't a problem. It's people's perception of it that causes the problem.
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Oct 17, 2006

    So well said, DeafinlySmart. Luckily, the negative perception and attitude is not the norm. I need to focus on doing all that I can for those who care and who will listen. Another bad day today; but don't want to start on another tangent.
     
  9. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Oct 17, 2006

    AMEN! So much has changed thanks to dedicated, compassionate and understanding folks. Luckily education and exposure is MOST of the key.
     
  10. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Oct 17, 2006

    Deafinitley Smart, that was the best thing I've heard yet. Thank you for expressing that.
     
  11. Giggles1100

    Giggles1100 Comrade

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    Oct 19, 2006

    I have felt that way, it got so bad at my old school I was throwing up every morning, I had no support f rom principals or anything. You know how I fixed it? I quit and took a 10 year break from teaching, Ijust went back this year, You knwo what, I found out if I had started at this school I might never have taken 10 years off. I used to teach what you did and all I ever wanted was a Developmental Life skills class and they were not willing to reassign me because no one wants your kids kind of thing. I knew going back what I wanted to teach and not only did I get that class, going to a new district made all the difference in the world. I do not want to discourage you but I have been there and I did burn myself out, I say tough it out this year and see if the district will transfer you to a new school or even a different type of class for next year and go ahead and ask the principal or SPecial Ed if this is a possibility and if not then start applying in January to new schools for the upcoming year.

    Hugs, we are never appreciated by regular ed teachers, I commend you for keeping a cool head on your shoulders, when they are being stubborn.
     

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