a volunteer mom w/teacher problem

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by jx4b, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    My first child is in Kindergarten and doing great, I like the school & teacher; all seemed well. I began volunteering in the room and noticed a few things that concerned me and I brought these up in the first parent/teacher conference. Having to do with positive reinforcement and singling out kids who don't get a "star" in front of the whole class etc. To make a semi-long story short, the last interaction I had with the teacher was her email stating we need to make an appnt. to discuss what the role of a volunteer is and until then I cannot come in. I am so upset over this, I love kids, I respect teachers, I someday hope to be in the education field as a para, I am just at a loss for what went wrong. Please help!
     
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  3. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Doesn't sound like this teacher uses positive discipline. Not all teachers do. I don't know what to tell you.
    Best of luck.
    BTW what part of WA are you in?
     
  4. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    To elaborate a bit more - I am looking for a teacher's point of view. I tried my best to bring up concerns as non-threatening a way as possible. Ironically, I am not worried about my own child, but for others I've seen struggling. She asked me to be more specific, I was, and now I need to learn what is means to be a volunteer? I am trying sooo hard not to be judgemental or jump to conclusions, I was only trying to help, why is she feeling so attacked? And what is the best way for me to handle the upcoming appointment in order for us to have a good communicative relationship? I hope someone will reply - I am going crazy mulling this over & over in my own head! Thanks - anxious mom new to school politics.
     
  5. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    Without knowing the people involved, my best guess is that this teacher feels as though you volunteered to assist in the classroom to observe what goes on during the day.

    I personally tend to get very defensive and I probably would be upset also if a parent volunteered in the classroom and then brought up concerns about my classroom management afterwards. Am I saying you were wrong? Not at all! :) I'm just saying that I can understand how she would get defensive about it. That may be why she wants to speak with you about the "role of a volunteer." She probably feels as though you volunteered for the wrong reasons (again, I'm not saying that you did anything wrong).

    As far as the next meeting, explain to her your goals for your career in education. Explain that this is the main reason why you want to volunteer in her classroom. If your concerns are brought up again explain that you were not trying to attack her, but you were just feeling badly for the children who were being singled-out.

    Sorry this post is getting a little long...
    Anyway, the fact is, it is her classroom and there's not a whole lot you can do about her classroom management style. I'm sure the principal is aware of how she runs her classroom and if he/she is ok with it, that's just the way it's going to be, I guess. If it does become a major concern for you, though, speak with the admin.
     
  6. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    insight much needed

    beth, thank you. I can totally see where you are coming from and you are right - my concerns were coming from a parent's point of view not as a volunteer. I have always wanted to volunteer solely because I want to be involved in my child's life - it was never to "spy" or something along those lines. My concerns were seperate, to volunteer is to assist the teacher (and get a glimpse into my child's time in a different environment!), bringing up concerns is in my opinion a moral obligation for the better of kids. And yes, you are probably right that in that the way she runs her room is also the way the other Kindergarten teachers run theirs - they all follow the same guidelines and those are obviously approved by the P. I hope during our meeting I can calm her defenses. And then maybe I can start a new "thread" in here about how it seems so sad when a child doesn't get her star repeatedly in front of the whole class - isn't that a form of humiliation? I think the "star chart" system that they used could be more individual at each child's desk rather than something done at the end of the day in front of all their peers.
     
  7. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    I completely agree with you. That is humiliation and that's why I don't blame you for bringing it up to her. I don't use methods like that and even when I do give rewards I'm more likely to put the spotlight on those who have earned the rewards rather than those who have not.
    I can just relate to how the teacher feels, that's all.
     
  8. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I think that if you approach the meeting openly and let her know that you are interested in what her needs for volunteers are, it will go better than you might expect. Just stay away from your criticisms about the behavior management system - unless your own child has emotional issues which arise. In general, I totally agree with you and don't use any visible rewards in my class.
     
  9. ozteach

    ozteach Comrade

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    You've really been very understanding and your wish not to offend comes through very clearly here, as I'm sure it will in your personal discussion with her. Next time though, I would be very wary of discussing other children, or anything that is outside of your own child, with the teacher. Parent volunteers are a mixed blessing (I'm a teacher and I also volunteer in my son's kindy class). Because they are in your room, they are aware of other children and their achievements and behaviour. I have found this can be awkward when the parents then discuss each child's behaviour in the car park after school.

    I don't like the way the teacher is using a star chart either - it's so demoralising for many children. In fact, often it only reinforces those children who've learnt to play the game anyway.

    However, I make it a rule to never discuss anything with a teacher that I wouldn't know if I wasn't volunteering in their room. That means that normally I wouldn't see other children's rewards or her management, I would just know about my own child and his interactions with her.

    You have been so reasonable with her so far, I'm sure she'll understand that your intentions were good. Maybe next time you see something in a classroom that you question, you could raise it with the teacher by saying you're planning on studying to teach and you're interested in her system, can she explain how it works and why she uses it? Or maybe, file it away as a system you wouldn't use yourself and think of it as a learning experience!
     
  10. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    wow. I can see what you're saying, it is just so sad & frustrating to me that people play these games. If I were to never discuss things I only see as a volunteer I would not be able to tell her (with the BEST of intentions) that I see a poor little girl being singled out by the system that is used - I am just supposed to play blind because luckily my son is an over-achiever who has had preschool experience while others are totally lost and confused and thus not getting stars? On the other hand, I am beginning to understand that maybe I am on the losing side here in that the reward system they use is considered good and widely accepted, I am just a little voice, and I maybe I should keep my voice silent because after all my child is doing fine.
     
  11. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    I don't understand the star chart thing. She calls everyone up one at a time and tells the student if he or she earned a star?

    I have seen flip charts used for naughty behavior.

    I agree with the others. I hope you are able to continue volunteering.

    Jaime
     
  12. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    At the end of the day they have one last circle time and as each kid sits down she awards (or not) a star and says something like: "Jane, thank you for ..." or "you did a good job on ..." and then "you get your stars today" and she marks in two stars on the chart next to the appropriate name. Conversely, she may also say "John you did not ..." or "you forgot to..." and then "you do not get your stars today John." So, they are supposed to get 10 stars by friday (2 a day) and if they do they get a prize like a candy or sticker, and it starts fresh on Monday. I told the teacher (after being asked to elaborate) that I think reward systems can be beneficial but I think it may need to be implemented in a different way so that the ones who don't get a star (especially repeatedly) don't feel humiliated and the ones who always do don't get a ego (like I fear my son does!). I just think it should be more a private/individual goal. Anyway, that's the star chart system! Thank you all so much for your input, it has been really helpful & insightful. I have to go to the bus stop now, but I hope to see more thoughts on this thread (reward systems, singling out, volunteering, teacher feeling attacked etc.) so that I can be as prepared as possible when I have my meeting with the teach. :) Thanks all!
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Ok- here's the problem with her star chart- She is using positive reinforcement in the wrong way. The payoff should be WHEN a child gets 10 stars THEN they get the reward- not 10 by Friday and then start at zero regardless of whether you got your ten or not. If you lose your stars on Monday, you are NEVER going to get 10 this week so what is your motivation to be good???

    I do like the advice given here about volunteers and how to approach this teacher for your conference. I think you could share that you are so interested in education and that you asked the questions you did because you want to understand better.
     
  14. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    Well said.
    The system she's got going is obviously not working for all of the students. Hopefully she'll realize that and change the way she's doing things some-what.
     
  15. maroki

    maroki Comrade

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    I, too, can understand how she feels defensive. I had a situation near the beginning of the year where a parent brought up a concern to me (about the whole class, not just her child) and then soon after asked if she could start volunteering in my classroom. Even though it isn't the same situation, I definitely felt defensive because I felt as though she was only interested to keep tabs on the concern she brought up and not to actually volunteer in the classroom. In this case, she probably assumed that you simply wanted to volunteer in the classroom and never thought that you may be formulating opinions about her classroom management. And on top of that, your child thrives within the management system and so she may have felt the attack was even more personal, since you weren't necessarily questioning the system because it doesn't work for your child.

    That being said, the fact that you somewhat blindsided her during parent-teacher conferences probably didn't help in her defensiveness. She probably prepared herself to talk about your child specifically and since the observations about the "star rewards" system weren't related to your child, it came even more out of left field.

    It sounds like you are a very concerned, involved parent. However, if the teacher feels you are there to observe and critique her teaching methods instead of volunteer your time, as she may very well feel now, I don't know how much she will be willing to have you in the classroom anymore until she sets "ground rules", as it would seem she wants to.
     
  16. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    She's lucky though that you brought it up to her instead of jumping several chains of commands like I seen a parent do over things they haven't even asked about nor been in the classroom to see firsthand. I mean from word of mouth (kids) to superintendent. No teacher or principal. In the end it was a misunderstanding and could have been cleared up with a simple question. Interestingly the same mom STILL went to the superintedent the very next time she had a problem. Both times it was misunderstandings or inaccurate perceptions. She was nice to us and showering us with praise when she saw us though. While this is not the same in your case, it is easy for me to see OFTEN how teachers go from being able to take criticism to being defensive with time and experience.

    Posititive Reinforcement does follow a certain pattern and people do misapply it. What's interesting is to watch our behavior consultant TELL us and COACH us on these things and then accidentally misapply it herself in the very next breath. Sometimes it is hard to see things clearly enough in sheer frustration. It sounds as though either the teacher doesn't have a clear understanding of how to apply positive reinforcement correctly OR she is frustrated with a certain sector of the class and is trying a different method to see if it will work because her initial efforts aren't cutting it. Just a thought.
     
  17. maroki

    maroki Comrade

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    I completely agree with this. This has happened to me (twice this year already) with the same parent, and I NEVER found out about the issue until after all was said and done....and all of it could have been resolved by a simple conversation with me.
     
  18. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    Thank you Thank you - I am understanding so much more of where the teacher is coming from. She has just emailed me on exactly that point of ground rules for volunteering. I think I need to let her know that this is all new to me, and that I was only bringing up concerns because I thought it was the right thing to do. I was voicing my opinions out of care and not to critique her. I am now told by her that I basically cannot do this, unless it is about my child. I am open to discussion, why can't she be? She even agreed with me that she has some of the same concerns as I do but that it is not my job to worry about it. So, is this correct that unless I am a school employee I am not at authority to voice concerns unless it involves my child? I just want to tell her that I am sorry for making her feel attacked and that I absolutely respect what an extremely difficult job she has and that I am have only good intentions.
     
  19. herins

    herins Companion

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    While I agree that her star chart sounds poorly implemented, I do want to point out another issue. Teachers are expected to allow parents to come in at their whim and volunteer, and quite often the parent wants to do more than help. It's hard to allow for parents (who often have no experience in education, but feel they could do it better) to judge your teaching based on witnessing an hour or two.
    I'm not writing this to offend you, I'm merely playing devil's advocate.
     
  20. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    As a teacher, I thought that it would be funny to take one of these parents that are overly critical and who think that they could do better than you and throw them in my class for a day and teach my kids. Give this parent all of my TEs and let them figure out how to teach my kids and maintain control. :D

    Anyways, I hope you can get everything straightened out. Just go in their and do your best and hopefully things will smooth over. And like someone else said, just take that behavior plan she has and put it in your teacher tool box of things you'll never do when you work in a classroom. Take it as a learning experience. At least when you're in the class with them, you can still make a postive impact on the kids.
     
  21. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    I also hope that being a parent first before entering the teaching realm will serve as a learning experience. As I will understand that MOST parents do NOT believe they could do better. Most parents simply CARE, period. That is really what the entire problem is here, is the teacher felt that I was saying she is not doing well. I am not the one who made her feel insecure - that is her feeling, not one I gave her. Her vulnerability to these types of feelings (even tho I can understand some reasons why she may feel them, past bad experiences, hearing horror stories etc.) should not affect how an individual parent's concerns are dealt with. She did not talk to me about my concerns, tell me why they are good and why they work in her room (proove me wrong, give me some insight) she only got defensive and belittled me into shutting up because I was fearful of getting off on a bad foot when I have 9 years ahead of me with my kids in that school. Sorry. I just wish games did not have to be played here, and I wonder that teacher's feelings of not being respected as they deserve does not go the other way around also. Most parents are just trying to help. Let us help, help us understand, especially when it is our first experience with our loved little ones in school.
     
  22. rcohen22

    rcohen22 New Member

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    A quick response

    Token reward systems as you have described are simply poor practice - a very "old school" way of managing a classroom - lazy, and with detrimental effects on each child involved. Children's motivation to do their best should come from within, not from a desire to please their teacher and earn a flimsy sticker. There are many more appropriate (and effective) ways of motivating children to take interest in classroom activities - such as making the activities rich and engaging - and take responsibility for their actions, and participate cooperatively as members of the classroom community. There are instances where children with challenging behavior can benefit from individualized systems using various reinforcers (in which case the implementation of the behavior system/chart/etc. would not take place for all the other children to observe). But this is unrelated to the situation you've described. As a teacher I can say that I would feel annoyed if a parent volunteer questioned my methods or style, but I would take their considerations to heart and do a little self-reflection to examine whether or not their concerns were valid, and accordingly adjust my practice, perhaps try something new. But the teacher you describe does not seem like the type that would do such a thing, especially if she/he is using such a reward system! I mean, come on, she/he should pick up an educational theory book published in the last 25 years to get some new ideas! But seriously, unfortunately you probably need to wait it out - hopefully your child will have a better teacher next year. In fact, you may want to research a little to see if other teachers in your child's school follow similar practices, and if so, and if their are other options as far as elementary schools in your area (I live in NY city, so this is an option, it may not be where you live), consider switching schools. Yes, I am that serious about how backwards the token reward system is. And as for the children who are suffering because of their lack of gold stars, their is little you can do, unless you are willing to speak to the administration (who probably know or don't know but don't really care) or the children's parents, both of which will seriously damage your relationship with your child's teacher. Sigh. Good Luck.
     
  23. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    thank you for your honesty. I completely agree and have only recently discovered some interesting research on these types of reward systems. Unfortunately, the entire school uses this type of thing, advancing for each grade. Next year in 1st grade is the red/yellow/green light thing - how is that? Is that the same as the star chart? My only concern at first, as I do not have an educational or psychology degree, only from a parent point of view, was that I didn't like how kid's were not given stars or the Friday reward in front of thier classmates - that is just so bluntly degrading - and I was amazed that no one (the teach or P) seems to agree with that.
    There are other elem schools in my district but I think I would have to go thru some red tape in order to switch, but first find out if they do the same thing. And secondly, get over the guilt of the other kids left in that environment - whose parents don't even know because they don't have the same lucky opportunity that I have of being involved. I wouldn't try to talk to the parents, that seems really stepping out of lines (even tho I want to), if I really can't shake the need to do something I suppose I would have to approach the upper admin. But, of coarse that could be a brick wall.
     
  24. kem

    kem Companion

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    I agree with what all is being said, and I just want to add a kudos to you for volunteering in your child's classroom! What you are doing is invaluable to your child!
     
  25. KdgtnCop

    KdgtnCop Rookie

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    Dec 8, 2006

    Good for you for taking an interest in your child's education, and giving freely of your time in his classroom. When parents model the importance of education, children take it seriously.
    As far as the "token rewards" system...two different thoughts: A) Children learn that by following the rules and "doing the right thing" they may get a public 'reward' or honor. (same as if they won an art contest or a physical education/soccer award- but this is for behavior and doing schoolwork) My school gives awards for everything, and believe me, the Physical Education ribbons rarely go to the same children who earn "star of the Month" or "academic honors" awards. They will be doing it in the upper grades...is it wrong to reward now? No- if it's done the right way, as many others have stated.
    B) Rewards should be done privately.(Is competition OK?)
    Both thoughts are hotly debated, and research goes both ways...especially when sports are involved. Kindergarten age seems to be the 'cutoff' age in which teams keep "score."....remember, it's not always the kids who have the problem on the sidelines...it's the parents.
    That said...remember that as a parent volunteer, you are on the sidelines. You can cheer, and assist with the team, but you may not "coach."- and I don't mean it to sound offensive...believe me. But be careful not to discuss ANYTHING with a parent outside of school that you have seen inside the classroom. It can come back to bite you in a BIG way-especially if other parents repeat it back to the teacher or the Principal and your name is brought up....You are there to help with whatever the teacher needs you to do...you don't need to agree with her methods. If this is how she teaches, you will NOT change her...you will only alienate yourself and your child from the school. Sometimes the best intentions can backfire.
    I'm not supporting her method....but really, you'll be wasting your time trying to fight it. Focus on what's good! Good luck!
     
  26. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    Thanks "KdgtnCop", I appreciate the feedback and joining this forum has really given me a great amount of insight into... a lot. I agree with you on everything. The only concern I had was how bad behavior in one was pointed out to all. I understand the thought behind this (others can learn from it and maybe some peer pressure could help the one) but I just felt Kindergarten was too young for this and the more I researched these types of systems the more I began to disagree with them for all levels. But you're right, unless I am up to challenging the entire school's method, I should focus on the good - and there is a lot of it. In fact I'm amazed by what these K's can do already and it's only Dec!

    Thankfully, the teacher & I seem to have come back to a good teacher/parent relationship. She said that although she agrees with me on my concerns, that is how they (the district) do it; but that she has been trying to change it up a bit by rewarding (or not) the stars at different times in the day & on a more private/individual basis. And she also set the "ground rules" for voluneering (advised by the Principle to do so I am sure) which I needed to agree on before coming back in. Of coarse I agreed - I do honestly, and was a bit stunned that they thought I needed to be told a few obvious things (she cant discuss individuals with me - yes I know but what about a general concern? or that I am not to talk about other children to other parents - I wouldn't! And that I am there to assist her - I know!) I suppose this was just a cover-the-back sort of thing, so I understand.

    So, in the end (after some misunderstandings on where I was coming from causing her to feel somewhat attacked and defensive) she has taken into consideration my concerns and I believe she has realized that I am just a new mom who doesn't know how to "play the game". We seem to be back to "normal" - it has all blown over - and now I just hope I don't maker her nervous when I am there!

    Thanks everyone for your feed back. I am still very interested in how different teachers handle their students with different types of systems, especially at this young age. I know they can be terribly hard to manage (I run a home daycare) but I also believe that the first year or two in school can set the bar for the rest of a person's educational experience; so if a reward system has been proven detrimental to a child's esteem or learning ability why is it still being practiced? Perhaps, as I have heard from some teachers here, the basic method may have been good but a little tweek can put a negative spin on the whole thing very easily. I will continue my "thirst for knowledge" about this topic here on other threads and elsewhere. Please feel free to let me know your opinions on where to gain information on this topic. Thanks all! This has been a great learning experience for me!
    -jx4b
     
  27. KdgtnCop

    KdgtnCop Rookie

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    Dec 9, 2006

    Glad to hear that everything is back to normal! You sound like a true asset to the teacher/class!
    I completely agree with you- a small tweak in a strategy can really give it a whole new spin (both positive and negative.) There are so many great books about classroom management...The book "The First Days of School" (Wong)is great for beginning organization/management, or the "Essential 55" for a basic list of great POSITIVE things to incorporate into a classroom enviroment....but just like the "Educational Fads" of the 80's and 90's (think: Whole Language!)- some things are trial and error. There are trends in education that come and go.... and some should "go" quickly!
    You sound so excited and interested in keeping up with the current trends in education/research! You might want to subscribe to an Educational Journal...check out NAEYC for a list!
    Good luck and keep up your quest for knowledge!
     
  28. Teacher13

    Teacher13 Rookie

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    Dec 12, 2006

    She probably doesnt feel comfortable with you in the classrooom anymore as you commented on her discipline stategies. You also only were there for a VERY short amount of time... you dont know what else she may be doing as far as positive discipline. Some teachers dont want volunteers for this very reason. Dont be surprised if you are not asked back... sorry.
     
  29. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2006

    from simple concern into teacher politics

    Teacher13 - are you really "sorry"? Your statements seem to me to be in sync with what I came up against in an overly-defensive and unhelpful teacher. Ugh. It is really frustrating to me that people in positions of power and knowledge cannot seem to understand that an outsider could be coming from an innocent stand-point. Here is a quote that I have stumbled across: "...a history of schools regarding parents as intruders and critics rather than partners have built walls.":(

    You're right, my volunteer hours have not accumulated to a lot, but so what? If I have a question after even only 5 minutes, why can't I ask it? :confused: And what stopped her from telling me what other positive disciplines she uses? Or why the things I was concerned about work? I got nothing. I got "maybe you should find another school" followed by being asked to not volunteer.

    If I seem a bit angry right now, I am, and I am not sorry. I have learned a very sad lesson through out this and I think it is important for teachers out there to take heed - volunteer parents are not out to get you. We want to help. I am sure some parents need to be reminded of certain boundaries; I for one have tried to respect those boundaries, and did not think I would be crossing them by raising up a concern.

    You said, "Some teachers dont want volunteers for this very reason". Is the "reason" that I "commented on her discipline strategies"? A teacher who doesn't want volunteers for this is sad and unnerving. That is a teacher who is insecure - a teacher who may be doing a great job but afraid to be observed or a teacher who knows deep down they could do better.

    Fortunately, I was asked back.
     
  30. totallybusy

    totallybusy Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2006

    Be careful! If you go to the principal with this chances are he/she will support the teacher. Then there is the chance of not volunteering in the school. Plus your child has this teacher for the rest of the year. I would go to the meeting and request the principal to be present. Review your points but do not get defensive and go back volunteering. The teacher will probably watch herself more closely. In the event that she doesn't -document happenings as they occur then when the year is over send them to the principal and make your concerns known in a formal letter. At the end of the day you have done your part in contributing to a healthy learning environment.
     
  31. Teacher13

    Teacher13 Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2006

    Well to respond I love having parents in and feel Very secures in doing so. I dont think the room were in has a secure teacher and probably does NOT have a great handle on discipline. Since you are a mom... think of it like this... a "helper" who has never had her own children or even babysat before comes over and you happen to be having a difficult day with your children (they are sick or whiny or having an off day for some reason) she whitnesses you repremanding them and then tells you how youre not doing a good job parenting your children.

    Its just that MOST parent have no idea how to handle a class of 25 students and definitly dont know how to use the best strategies to teach them reading and writing... yet they have comments.

    You are probably the exception.. but maybe you came across rude (having NO experience in the situation)

    Also, you probably werent asked back because that teacher REALLY WANT YOUR HELP.
     
  32. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2006

    "Its just that MOST parent have no idea how to handle a class of 25 students and definitely dont know how to use the best strategies to teach them reading and writing... yet they have comments." - Teacher13

    I completely agree. We did not go to school for this, a teacher is a professional. That means it is their area of expertise. However - parents will have comments. questions. concerns. Is that wrong??

    I am pretty sure I did not come across as rude, as I obviously did not say all that I have said here. I tried to be very non-specific, non-personal, and tried to present my concern as an opportunity for her to enlighten me.

    I am not sure if you have a typo, or mis-read my post, but I was asked back. I actually wonder if maybe the teacher agrees with me and wishes the curriculum was more up to date on behavior management but she has to watch what she says since she is teaching in a district that uses these types of systems throughout.

    Yes, "totallybusy" - I have been keeping a log since the beginning. I hope that at the end of the year I won't have to refer to it, but it's there if necessary.

    Guys, I am sorry if I have come across as rude or all-knowing in these last couple posts. I really don't mean to, I just think that so many teachers have these walls up against parents because of a few bad seeds, it's not fair to those of us with sincere concerns that we cannot be communicated to like respectable adults. I realize this thread has gotten very long, and I want to point out that viewers should read the thread in its entirety if possible before making an opinion about the situation or me.
     
  33. jx4b

    jx4b Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2006

    ps
    I am going to take a long break from coming back to this forum. Because, thankfully my situation seems to have (hopefully) ironed itself out for the most part, and this thread is actually just keeping my emotions on high-gear! I don't want to un-intentionally form opinions about my son's teacher due to over-analyzing here - does that make sense?! Anyway - I do want to say again THANK YOU to everyone who responded, and it's nice to know that I can come back if ever I need to again. It was all very helpful.
    signed:
    chillin' out, ... mom who cares.
     
  34. Teacher13

    Teacher13 Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2006

    No typo

    "Also, you probably werent asked back because that teacher REALLY WANT YOUR HELP."

    Meaning maybe she HAD to ask you back or couldnt be rude... or had no LEGIT reason to say dont come again.
     
  35. totallybusy

    totallybusy Rookie

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    Dec 14, 2006

    Good Luck in all you do! Your heart is in the right place, looking out for children and their self esteem. Stand tall and be proud!
     
  36. teachinforGod

    teachinforGod New Member

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    Dec 14, 2006

    It's great that you offer your time to this teacher. Try to remember that you never know how things really are until you are in a person's shoes. That is never more true than in teaching. You aren't in the class room all the time, so you may have caught her on a few bad days. I always think the Lord gives the best answers--go to the person and tell them how you feel. Set up the appointment and be honest with her. I bet the two of you learn a lot about each other and find that you both have similar goals for the students in that classroom . Good luck-
     

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