A very angry student...

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by aim123, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. aim123

    aim123 Rookie

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    Oct 2, 2010

    I'm a new teacher in desperate need of some advice with my CTT class, and one student in particular. Any advice anyone has would be extremely helpful!!

    I teach in small middle school that divides each grade into classes based on ability/grades. The lowest performing class is a CTT class, mixing both special needs children and children with low grades (that are unclassified). From what I understand, CTT classes are supposed to have a mix of special needs children, as well as "role model" children.. the way the CTT was mixed with this grade is causing major issues both in behavior and academics.

    Anyway, we have a student that joined us this year for 7th grade (our school is 6-8). The CTT model for 6th grade has the children in one room all day, but in 7th grade, they travel to different classrooms all day (as a group - all classes do this). This student came from a self-contained special education class last year, and is now matriculating all day with the CTT class. I feel she missed that step of self-contained CTT like the other students in her class had last year.

    She is a very angry young lady, constantly getting into fights (verbal as well as physical at times) with her peers. She has major attitude with the teachers, including myself. She comes late to class, or is at the dean or counselor at least 3 times a week. She often refuses to do work, or won't let me see her work when she does it. She covers it with her hands when I walk around to check! Anything sets her off on a major outburst, and I'm not quite sure what to do.

    I spoke with her mom twice, once in person (impromptu conference as the mother was called in due to a physical altercation), and once on the phone today. She seems to think that her daughter should go back to a self contained class, which I agree with, but am reluctant to say since it is so early in the school year. I know she is receiving counseling both inside and outside of school.

    The fact is, she is constantly disrupting this class (which has behavior/academic problems due to the lack of student role models to begin with). I feel she poses a danger to other students. How can I handle this? I don't want to give up on her and recommend that the mother places her back in self-contained special ed as this would take her out of our school. Please help!!:help:
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Oct 2, 2010

    I would focus on the positives with her. Extra praise! Also, get a very structured routine that she can follow, routine helps. Provide very clear expectations.
    Since she is in middle school, ask her what she wants to earn. Provide an opportunity to earn this reward.
     
  4. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Oct 2, 2010

    This may or may not work, but it's worth a shot. I had one very angry young man in one of my classes. He was a new student, so I talked to him before school one day. I told him that we didn't know each other, and that meant, that whatever had happened in the past didn't matter to me. The only thing that matters to me is what was going on right then, in my classroom. I told him he had a clean, perfect slate, and that he had some important choices to make. If he made the right choices in my class, then nothing else mattered to me. Anything that had happened in the past was in the past. It took a few weeks to see any progress, but I kept reminding him that it was only his choices and actions in my classroom that mattered. The progress was slow, and there was lots of backsliding, but after a year he started to show dramatic improvement. When he left my class, he still had a long way to go, that year was a very positive year for him. Most of the improvement he showed was only in my class, but some of the improved behavior showed up in other classes as well.

    Like I said earlier, it might not work for the young lady in your class. I kinda went with my gut with the young man in my class, and it worked. I know I'm rambling, but hopefully there's something in there that can help you. :)
     
  5. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Oct 3, 2010

    I would document what is going on. I also would contact the previous teacher and find out the reasoning that caused her to be moved to a more mainstream class. I also would talk to last years teacher about their method of managing her anger issues. I would meet with the principal and the inclusion teacher and try and gain suggestions from them. If there is a PRIM manual at your school research suggestions from that book to try in the behavior management.
     
  6. aim123

    aim123 Rookie

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    Oct 17, 2010

    Thanks for all the great advice, I've been trying praise with her, and it seems to help (some of the time). Unfortunately, she was in two different schools last year, so I can't really reach out to former teachers for help. I'm hoping things continue to get better, even if it's only baby steps :)
     
  7. Jamtight

    Jamtight Rookie

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    Nov 3, 2010

    Have you attempted to show a little extra attention to her?
     
  8. chessimprov

    chessimprov Rookie

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    Nov 7, 2010

    Try inviting her to after school events you can attend, find out what the students' interests are and see if you can engage in them yourself in some way. Let her parents know about the events you think of. That is something that comes to mind.

    Many parents like to hear about academic feedback too and what they and/or their child can do to improve their current grade.

    I guess other possibilities that are harder to detect are things like could the child be acting out because of starvation or abuse or something like that? If you can figure out if it's an external factor (very hard to do), then coming up and/or asking others to come up with solutions may be somewhat easier to do.
     
  9. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

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    Nov 7, 2010

    Can you invite this student to have lunch with you one day? We have used this at the elem. level and it has worked well, giving the student some much needed 1:1 time, and also students tend to be less defiant usually when 1:1 with the teacher as their audience is gone. She might open up about things that are going on, either at home or in school; perhaps there is a bullying situation going on in school and she is having a hard time dealing with it, etc.
     

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