A quesion about teaching procedures...

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by MissaG, Jul 19, 2007.

  1. MissaG

    MissaG Companion

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    Jul 19, 2007

    Since I am switching from 5/6 to 3rd, I am unfamiliar with HOW to teach procedures. In years past, I have typed up just about everything the kids needed to know about my classroom and we read it and discussed it together. I know this won't work with 3rd, but without standing in front of the class and telling them the way everything is run, how do I go about it? What do you do?

    Also, is it better to teach procedures as they come up or go over everything at once?
     
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  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Jul 19, 2007

    Model and practice, practice, practice! I teach most procedures as we get to them, but I also give an overview (if that makes sense). For instance, when we line up, I expect it done quietly, the line to start in a certain spot, and all chairs pushed in. So before we line up to leave the room for the 1st time, I tell them how I want them to do it. Then I sit down at a student desk, quietly stand up, push my chair in, and walk to where the line should start. Then I take questions. Finally, I let them practice lining up (I usually call by shirt color). If one person forgets to push their chair in, or isn't quiet, etc., we sit down and start all over. The procedure must be done correctly 2 times before we leave the room. The next time we must line up, I have a student model, then we practice again. I continue doing this until it becomes habit.
     
  4. uclalum

    uclalum Groupie

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    Jul 19, 2007

    This won't help you now, but it's something to think about for next year:
    Last month, I made a short video of many of my rules and procedures. We made a mini-movie and I appointed a student to verbalize the directions while the other kids performed them. So Jailynn would look into the camera and say, "If you want to get a drink of water, there's no need to say one word-just hold up to fingers." Then I would zoom in on another child showing the signal for wanting a drink of water. I plan to both show the video and model the procedures during the first few weeks. In Harry Wong's Audiotape "How to Increase Student Achievement" he mentioned that this would also come in handy when there is a substitute. Since the movie is only 5 minutes, it won't take up much time to play. Then I won't have to worry about those kids who tell the sub,
    "Nu-uh! That's not how we do it!" because she/he will have seen the video.
    I'm not done editing it yet, but if I can upload it to photobucket, I will post a link so you can watch it if you would like.
     
  5. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Jul 19, 2007

    On the first day of class, I have the kids engaged in an activity right away. They usually are surveying other students. About 10 minutes into this, I tap a child and whisper for her to freeze. I do this with everyone, one at a time, but rather quickly. Once everyone is frozen, I very quietly teach my attention signal. (Give Me Five) This seems to work for me, right off the bat. We practice everything a lot! This is how I start at first, since they don't know how I am going to ask for their attention.
     

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