A Problem already...

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by cariberry, Jul 29, 2009.

  1. cariberry

    cariberry Rookie

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    Jul 29, 2009

    Hi everyone...school started for me on Tuesday and I already have a problem. I have a little boy who is constantly hitting other kids. In my 5 years of teaching I have never really had a problem with this. I did one year, but she was gone most of the day to resource and behavior class.

    I sent him to Think Time today (our school wide discipline program), but I don't think it even fazed him. His kindergarten teacher warned me a little beforehand about him, and she said that for him it is basically a lack of patience with other kids. Well, for me whatever it is I don't tolerate abuse of other kids. This is not safe for them. The mom and the other teacher told me that if he has something to work for, like a prize, then he will be nice. But, it has to be a cool prize. The k-teacher told me stuff he likes, and these are like $10 prizes.

    I think I am maybe being a terd here, but I don't feel like I should have to provide prizes for him. At least not of this amount. I am happy to let him pick out of the prize box at the end of the day if he is nice, but these are like oriental trading type of prizes--not to his liking. I told myself, and my husband that this year I was really going to curb my spending.

    Our insurance premiums are going up (once again) and I am taking a $6000 pay cut (as are all teachers in UT).

    Can anyone help me with any advice?

    Thanks,
    Cari
     
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  3. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Jul 29, 2009

    Okay - I don't teach elementary - but my first thought was is this little boy hitting so he can get a cool $10 prize for NOT hitting?? If his mom and K teacher did this last year, then why wouldn't he expect to be treated the same this year??
     
  4. diggerdeb

    diggerdeb Comrade

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    Jul 29, 2009

    Maybe, sit with him and WITH him generate a list of things he wants to work for each day. They may be things like extra dessert or 10 min. of a story 1 on ! or 10 extra min. computer time...any thing he likes.

    I know you want him to not him because "it is the right thing to do" but sometimes outside treasures help motivate.

    By the way-I cannot school starts in July. We didn't end last year until June 26!!!!
     
  5. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Jul 29, 2009

    I don't reward for expected behavior. I would not buy him prizes above and beyond what the rest of the class gets. I would be firm and remove him from group activities at the slightest hint of inappropriate behavior. If he can't keep his hands to hisself, he has to do independent activities and they should be fairly boring and not as fun as what he misses.
     
  6. wdwteach

    wdwteach Cohort

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    Jul 29, 2009

    Reward the other kid that he hits - is my first thought. And get down on his little level and say " Do not put your hands on another student" Grit your teeth a little.:D Remind him of that often. I may be a little harsh but I do not tolerate little bullies! I always picture them hitting my own child.
     
  7. MsX

    MsX Companion

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    Jul 29, 2009

    I take a very hard stance on hitting. Generally, the first time a kid hits, I give them a time out, a serious discussion (about what will have to happen if hitting continues), and send a note home that lets the parents know what happened. If they hit any time after that, I tell the child that if I can't count on them to behave safely in my classroom, then he/she can't be there ("oh man, I'm so sad that you chose to hit instead of use your words! Well, you know it's my job to keep all the students in our class safe, and now I can't be sure that you'll keep your hands to yourself...") I then send the child to a buddy classroom with some worksheets to do and usually I have them write an apology note to the child who was hit - how long they stay depends on the child and the incident, sometimes it's half an hour, sometimes it's the whole morning... I also send a note home to the parent.

    I use to just give time outs if hitting happened but I had much more problems. I agree with other posters that rewards are probably not the best solution. I prefer for a loss of privelege (like participating in our class) when a child can't be safe with others.
     
  8. wdwteach

    wdwteach Cohort

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    Jul 29, 2009

    I use the buddy classroom too. I have a good friend across the hall and we send kids to the other classroom sometimes. I know that principals feel differently about this idea. Some approve a few minutes in another classroom and some don't like it.
     
  9. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Jul 29, 2009

    At my school, hitting another child is an assault and the police are called in to handle it. Seems harsh but it works. We have zero tolerance. Our security is an on-duty police officer. It's part of his regular work day so he handles all assaults. If he sees it necessary to call for a squad car, we have parents come in too. Yep, even with 1st graders. BTW...my school is a very pleasant environment where children feel safe and secure. We are a Pre-K through 8 building in an upper-middle class neighborhood. If this happens in our classroom, we call on the intercom for Officer ------ to come to our room. Makes a powerful impact on the others. The child who has been assaulted is picked up by the school counselor and the parents are called to be part of the conversation. Sometimes parents want to press charges against the other child. Sometimes they don't. Once a child makes a decision to assault another child, he and his family have to deal with the real-life consequences of not respecting others and breaking the law.
     
  10. cariberry

    cariberry Rookie

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    Jul 29, 2009

    Dang

    Wow Zoe!!

    Where do you teach? I am moving there! The only other time I had problems with a child hitting was a very violent little girl and I got very little support from anyone. I had 11 pages of notes when I referred her for special services (I tried to get her in a behavior unit that is at another school). They told me she didn't qualify for anything...

    She would spit, bite (drew blood from my leg with her teeth), she would say the F word all the time, and she scratched a lot too. She even used profanity to the principal and local officer (we don't have a school officer). Still nothing...

    She is still at my school, just basically in resource all day, even though she is veerrrrrrryyyy smart.

    Go figure, Utah schools suck, LOL


    Thanks for your advice everyone,
    Cari
     
  11. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Jul 30, 2009

    I had a child like that....very impulsive and couldn't stop himself. Turned out he was adhd.

    Are you in a public school? Can you refer him for services? Sounds like he needs help getting to the bottom of what's causing the hitting, not just something superficial on the surface like rewards. Although the rewards will help, he needs more help than just that.
     
  12. NJTeacher82

    NJTeacher82 Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2009

    I had a boy last year who did the same exact thing. He thought it was funny to hit people and his parents weren't very supportive. In his culture, it is ok to treat people that way. Anyway, he loved readed. I had him work towards 20 minutes of free reading at the end of the week. Maybe you can find something this boy loves to DO instead of HAVE. Computer time? Time with the teacher? Game time? This way, you wont have to spend your money.
     
  13. ms. yi

    ms. yi Comrade

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    Jul 30, 2009

  14. lucylucy

    lucylucy Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2009

    Is hitting the only inappropriate behavior he exhibits? What are his academic skills like? I'm very sorry, this must be a really frustrating situation! If hitting is his only problem behavior then I would worry about bribing him with "prizes" - - because then no hitting = prizes and by default no prizes=hitting. If there is more going on then it may be beneficial to set up a behavior plan. I made a behavior plan last year that I used with several students. It was really simple but it had to do with how hard the student was trying to "do his best" and there were points awarded - if he got a high number of points he got a reward (not tangible, but something like 10 minutes of drawing time in class, etc...). If got a medium amount of points there was no reward, and if it was low then he received a consequence at home. If you have support from parents, something like that may work well. Good luck!
     
  15. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    Jul 30, 2009

    I agree with the others about finding him rewards that don't cost anything and looking into referals for the child. In my experience with chronic behavior issues, I often will modify the reward after a period of time so that the child needs to consistently improve to continue being rewarded. Good luck!
     
  16. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Send him home!!!
    I tell all of my students, the hitters, the victims, the bystanders and everyone in between:
    It is your job to make sure that you behave in a safe way, and it's my job to make sure that this room is a safe place to be. If you ever hit another person, then it is no longer safe, you will be sent home for the day."

    Yes, work out whatever system you need, positive reinforcement etc, to get him started and on the right track... but violence is never tolerated. EVER. Yes, I know this is first grade. But the students in my first grade class are depending on me. They need to trust me that I will keep them safe. NO child should ever fear coming to school because someone will hit them.

    ETA: You need to know what the child is going home to, as well. If they are going home to video games and tv all day as reward for getting sent home, then the child stays by the office until dismissal. I'm VERY lucky that my school supports me in this.
     
  17. Doublescoop

    Doublescoop Companion

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    Aug 10, 2009

    I had a little "hitter" too. I firmly told him that HANDS ARE FOR HELPING AND NEVER FOR HITTING and then put a sticky note on the edge of his desk with cuts so that it had 5 "fingers". I challenged him to keep all his fingers for the day and he decided on a reward if he could keep at least one of the fingers. Each time he used his hands in a hurtful way, I'd nonchalantly remove one of the sticky note fingers and you could see him go OH NO! I found this worked well to at the very least make him aware of his impulsivity. As we continued, we made the rewards harder and harder to get (i.e. had to have all five fingers left at the end of the day/week, etc.)
     
  18. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    Aug 10, 2009

    i am sorry, this sounds so frustrating~ I hope you get a system that works. However there is just no way that I would be buying him anything. Maybe his parents want to purchase the rewards, and then give them to him at home?
     

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