A New Phenomenon - Students who don't listen

Discussion in 'General Education' started by GentleLion, Feb 17, 2013.

  1. GentleLion

    GentleLion New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 17, 2013

    Recently I visited a school and was asked to help a group of students who exhibited poor academic results and rowdy behavior.

    In my interaction with them, I observed they are not stupid. It is just that they find learning boring.

    From the availability of multimedia, children are becoming so accustomed to such media that they developed a "don't listen" attitude towards teachers whom they viewed as "boring".

    This can be a challenge to many who are trained in the traditional pedagogy and expect students to sit-and-listen, but experienced that students no longer listen to them.

    In future, teachers will need to be trained how to use a more engaging approach in teaching. They will need to use different strategy to get students more actively involved even through the extend of verbalizing what the students understand about the question before even embarking on the question itself.

    If teachers need to teach large classes then it will be a challenge, thus there will be a need to do screening and having small classes for students with such issue. Personally, I do not see it is the problem with the students. It is just the media world has got an upper hand of our children, and now we need to see how to train them to ensure they develop a learning attitude.
     
  2.  
  3. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2011
    Messages:
    819
    Likes Received:
    166

    Feb 17, 2013

    Education is not supposed to be a never-ending dog and pony show. Not all lessons can be engaging. When those kids are adults, their jobs won't always be fun and exciting.

    Let's have parents instill respect and discipline into their children. Let parents control the amount of media their children use.
     
  4. cometclear

    cometclear Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 17, 2013

    I don't mind saying this: The problem is not with the teachers. Not in general. The problem transcends education and involves a general lack of curiosity in our culture. The solution is not to press teachers to come up with even more elaborate ways of trying to coax a modicum of curiosity out of students. If a student is utterly bereft of curiosity and has not the drive to put minimal effort into learning, then a few things need to be better communicated to them by all parties involved: Life is not fair. Life is hard. For most of your lives, you will have to do things you don't particularly enjoy to put food on the table and a roof over your head. The more we prolong hiding these simple truths from you is the harder we make this realization for you down the line.
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    9,154
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 17, 2013

    The sit-and-listen method is not the only way to teach. Just because this doesn't seem to be working, doesn't mean children are not curious. Nor does every lesson require high demands of multimedia. Adults have changed the way we access information and relate to the world around us. This includes the business world. Why would we insist differently for students?
     
  6. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    143

    Feb 17, 2013

    I don't think there are many on this site that would argue your point. I think some of the other posters are suggesting a balanced approached to teaching. It can't all be "sit and listen". Nor should every lesson be designed as an entertaining multi-media affair designed to thrill and inspire. Sometimes it is just work and sometime it is just boring.
     
  7. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 17, 2013

    It is an old situation, and has been around for ages. When people get bored they don't listen. I did it in school and got into a lot of trouble with it. I was sent to the Dean's office and got paddled sometimes, BUT it was because some the teachers were just boring to me. The ones who taught in a fun and exciting way, or had hands-on activities were my favorite ones. Lectures were a killer with me. I could not sit still, I had to pick on someone, or do something to break the boredom; which got me into trouble every time. We had over 20 students, and most of us were bored to death with the lectures, and sitting down for long lengths of time. Teachers have to make teaching FUN and exciting for the students. It does not mean you have to be a comedian. Change the pace, when your students are giving you HINTS that YOU are BORING THEM TO DEATH!
    A LOT of teachers tend to forget that to some students, IF IT IS NOT FUN, FORGET IT!:D It's something that has to be addressed because of all the different challenges that we face. Teaching is hard, BUT very exciting to those who have the passion for making a BIG POSITIVE difference in the lives of our future TEAM PLAYERS AND LEADERS! MAKE IT FUN!
    I have a 3 right now in my class who are not geared for sitting down for a long time for circle, or seatwork. I give the class a break from their work, change to guitar music, or an action song, a puppet show, OR Center time; with their understanding that they will come back to their worksheets when I ask them to.
    It's worked out GREAT! :cool:
    Rebel1
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Feb 17, 2013

    LOL, Rebel1, I imagine that things are a bit easier to shake up in preK than they are in high school! "Getting your wiggles out" just doesn't work with 17 year olds like it does with 4 year olds ;)

    17 year olds need to know how to sit and listen to a lecture. I'm not about to break out the guitar and put the states of mitosis to a song. And then hope that everything they need to know for the state exam magically sinks in over the next two months.
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Feb 17, 2013

    I earned my Masters degree in 1997 and have been engaged in ongoing professional development for 15 years. I've never used an exclusive 'sit and listen' approach, nor is it the type of learning I benefit most from as a student.

    Professional educators need not employ a dog and pony show approach to engage learners. Instead we need to assess prior knowledge, capitalize on students' need to verbalize their own thoughts, engage them in constructivist, hands on learning, used inquiry based strategies and put some of the ownership of learning on the students themselves.

    Our role requires a paradigm shift for those traditional 'sage on the stage' old school approaches to more of a 'guide on the side'approach. This is nothing new or innovative to many, but may require additional professional development for those who tend to not examine their own practices and keep doing the same things but expect diffent results.:2cents:
     
  10. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 17, 2013

    Oh! Dang it!
    That's why I got in trouble a lot of times in High school!
    Go figure! I teach Pre-K instead of High School.
    I still am getting, "What goes around, comes around."
    I gave some of my poor high school teachers a run for their money.:(, and it was because they bored me.
    YOU still have to see where your lectures are boring your students to death, REGARDLESS of what grade you teach. There are ways to lecture and make it exciting and FUN. Never give up hope for a better way to teach. Take some trainings IF YOU NEED HELP. Why lose the battle because you don't want to get better at the way you train for it? There is hope for you, and for the children you are expected to teach, and prepare for exams. YOU can help make them do BETTER at learning; in a way that they have NEVER been challenged with BEFORE! :whistle:
    You can do it when you find that "THINGIE" that made you decide to teach, instead of doing another job. It's been done by some more effective teachers that I had in High School, and some that I currently keep in touch with in High School and Middle schools.
    YOU can DO IT SISTA!
    Go on with your bad self!

    Rebel1
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Feb 17, 2013

    Rebel...your comments should not have been dismissed so easily. While HS might not have a 'dance break', there are certainly lessons to be learned from each other, regardless of grade taught,about honoring students' needs and ways of learning.
     
  12. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    147

    Feb 17, 2013

    When I taught on a block, we had a stretch break. It worked well.
     
  13. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,185
    Likes Received:
    667

    Feb 17, 2013

    There is some truth to what you say, although it is a bit more complex than this.

    I do find students must be doing something most of the time. I find the following really helps:

    1. A great antecepatory set to get them interested and connected to the lesson.

    2. Lots of "pair/share" to have students share what they are learning.

    3. More work in partners and cooperative groups.

    4. More hands-on activiities.

    5. When students are seated more taking of notes and randomly calling on students. Students shouldn't just sit there.

    6. Every "passive" activity such as a video or a read aloud book is followed up with a quiz or an activity.

    Students aren't the only ones bored. I hate going to workshops where the presenter shows me 100 PowerPoint slides and just talks and talks. All people need to be engaged in learning not just lectured at for an hour. This doesn't require 5 dog and pony shows a day, just more planning to engage students.
     
  14. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    1,841
    Likes Received:
    51

    Feb 17, 2013

    I think that HS students do need to learn to sit and listen to a lecture. If they go to college, how many of their professors do you think will care what their ''learning style'' is? Especially if it's a large college where classes are over 100 students. So it is important for kids to learn how to take notes from a lecture while paying attention.

    Now obviously, I don't sit my kids down and lecture them for the entire class period. We do lots of activities, discussions, moving around, etc. But sometimes they need to sit and take notes for 10 or 15 minutes so they can study them. And that's just that.
     
  15. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    Messages:
    899
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 17, 2013

    I try to make my lectures conversations. I'm constantly peppering students with questions, sometimes allowing anyone to answer and other times calling on specific students. I also walk around the classroom instead of planting myself in one spot.
     
  16. cometclear

    cometclear Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 17, 2013

    Furthermore, in approximately how many workplaces will the boss adjust training and pace to "individual" needs?

    Like you, more times than not, I vary between lecture, discussions, group work and so on. That's all fine and good. Ultimately what determines if kids are learning something in your classroom is that the teacher really knows the subject they are teaching, they can relate it in ways students can understand and there is order and organization. The idea that the teacher who mostly lectures is less effective than one who varies teaching methods is a false one. Yes, someone who is poor at telling the story of history, science, literature or whatever subject will have students who are not engaged. However, most likely everyone on this forum best remembers that teacher who could tell history or science as a story that grabbed each of us. Yes, I know, that dreaded "teacher-centric" classroom. I would also note that nearly every educational expert I have encountered who preaches moving beyond the dreaded "teacher-centric" model has proceeded to inform us of these horrors in precisely the "teacher-centric" format that they supposedly revile.
     
  17. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Feb 17, 2013

    Same here. Sometimes when they are getting bored (and I might be too) yet we have to plow through to keep up with district pacing, I'll have them do something. SOMETHING. We do modified Cornell notes in my class. I might have the students write down something in their margins, read something they just copied from the Powerpoint and summarize right then, or even highlight an important definition.

    I try to keep my lectures to less than 30 minutes. I know how antsy I can get in church service after 45 minutes so I understand.

    But I am still bound by that pacing guide. I can't just chuck the lecture and get them up and moving because their attention span can't handle the 30 minute lecture. Semester-long state-tested courses just don't have a lot of flexibility. Especially when we have district assessments dotted throughout the semester.
     
  18. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Feb 17, 2013

    Yep!
     
  19. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,002

    Feb 17, 2013

    I thought this title was sarcastic at first...
     
  20. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,002

    Feb 17, 2013

    This is just my opinion, and it's not very well informed as I am just a first year teacher, but I think a lot of it has to do with students' motivation FOR learning.

    As parents and teachers in today's society we've spared any possible consequence for our children for not learning. People would look in horror at a teacher who simply lets her students fail when they don't do the work and don't make any effort to learn, expecting her to wave some type of magic wand to make them want to learn or putting on a show every lesson and somehow 'engaging' them.

    It doesn't work.

    Students aren't too stupid to figure out that we're just entertaining them. Students don't feel the satisfaction of engaging a material ON THEIR OWN, and coming through it, having accomplished something through their own decisions and efforts. We scaffold everything, differentiate everything, and basically do all of the work for them. They've learned to sit back, and expect the information to be shoveled into their brains by others.

    They are empowered by the legal implications for teachers if teachers decide to discipline them, don't teach them well enough, and their parents will back them up any time they mess up.

    Again, they never have to feel the consequences of their own actions because we set up so many systems to try to keep them from failing.

    Yes, we can engage more, and use technology, and it will enhance education, but I don't think we can expect it to do the work for us. I think the best thing to get students to learn is to foster an environment where they can feel the satisfaction of learning in and of itself, feel the consequences of their actions, and use them as learning experiences, and be able to make their own decisions in their learning.
     
  21. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    143

    Feb 17, 2013

    I have the same opinion as you. The students are being catered to and I think they know it. It has become easier for them to fail and get "credits" from summer school and credit recovery. I am a second year teacher but over 50 years old.The tail is now wagging the dog. I know there are those here who hate reference to the "real world" but no business I ever participated in spent time catering to the needs of the employee. Of course it was a consideration but it was not the driving concern.

    I had effective teachers. I want to be an effective teacher. However I don't want to be in the entertainment business. I do like interacting with my students and getting to know them but oftentimes we do have to get down to business and get to work. I'll leave it up to my P to decide if I am effective or not.
     
  22. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    Messages:
    899
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 17, 2013

    Amen! I am constantly torn between holding my students accountable for their own learning and providing enough support (graphic organizers, time spent instructing on basic skills rather than content). That kind of support is great in moderation, but I find that I am pushed to provide more and more of it in order to be in compliance with the district mindset.
     
  23. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Feb 17, 2013

    I know a lot of local business owners that constantly complain about how poorly prepared our graduates are for working. I know a lot of professors at a local university that say our graduates aren't prepared for college either. Our top students are having difficult times adjusting to university expectations.

    I have students that refuse to learn anything on their own. The concept of getting information from lecture, labs and the book confuses them. The idea of being tested on something I did not specifically state in class is beyond them. And their parents will complain as well. That is with honors students. Non-honors students? If I don't tell them, TWICE, "write this down" then it will not get written. We've been told by admin, other teachers, heck even on this board, not to expect them to read over their notes or do any sort of homework. So we should adjust (dumb-down) our expectations for non-honors students. Far too many of these students come to us without the basics (reading past a 3rd grade level, knowing how to multiply, etc) yet we are expected to make up 6 years of instruction AND teach them our content. Some of those students need extra help beyond the general ed teacher. But some of them learned early on that they did not have to do the work because there would not be any consequences. THAT mindset we need to change.
     
  24. greenbay33

    greenbay33 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 25, 2012
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 17, 2013

    I totally agree with this. Teachers are there to teach. Kids can go watch tv to be entertained. Now that doesn't mean i make my class boring or just sit and talk. I get them involved and try to find things they are interested in, but anymore I feel like kids don't really care.

    I know this is an age old problem, but unlike in the past when college helped kids to grow up and those who didn't had to work, today most kids don't even have to grow up. They can live at home, work some minimum wage job and live off mom and dad. Unfortunately these kids will get a rude awakening when its a little too late.

    Also, I think kids are just more disrespectful in a lot of schools. I'm not even 24 and haven't had a full time teaching job and i'm scared for the future. I truly want my students to succeed and make a difference, but it seems like they could care less.
     
  25. cometclear

    cometclear Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 17, 2013

    Well, your last point isn't even debatable.

    With regards to your first point, you can essentially create a monster. The bells and whistles of the last lesson were insufficient for the next rush needed. I'm actually a little impressed with the Common Core, in that the focus is on informational reading and writing. Looking over the standards, there is simply less room for the bells and whistles stuff. I think it will also better prepare kids for college and life in general,
     
  26. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    9,154
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 17, 2013

    I may not relate fully because I teach younger students but I can tell you that I DO evaluate college professors and workshop presenters on their ability to engage my interest. Some are more effective than others. I'm not automatically interested just because you say I should be. Students do need the ability to sit and listen for a period of time but there is more to it. You have to grab their curiosity first and part of the time, they need to be engaged in some type of productive application.

    We all talk about the real world outside of education. The truth is sometimes we are bored BUT we are rarely in a sit and listen mode with no interaction. You don't see that in the real world. I'm not talking about being an entertainment guru. I'm talking more about relating our teaching to the real world. Why is this important to learn? What is interesting about my subject matter? What can I do with it? How can I apply it? Where does it take me? By forcing the material down their throats without regards to the curiosity aspect, we are not teaching them to be curious and what to do with that curiosity. Education is all about how to continue to learn new things throughout life. Is your interest to teach them to sit-and-listen or is it your interest to teach them to satisfy their curiosity and create life long learners?

    I once had a biology professor who engaged my interest so deeply that I took extra classes I didn't need. I paid for it. Science was never my favorite subject but he made me curious. THAT is an effective teacher. Yes I had to sit and listen for parts. Yes I had to do tasks I didn't necessarily want to do. But he got me hooked.

    I also think we need to be doing far more in this digital age to reach digital learners. This shouldn't be a passive process.

    As for college professors, you bet your bottom dollar that if they don't effectively raise my interest or make me feel it was relevant, it is going on my evaluation. I've had professors who teach 500 students at a time engage me more than some that only had 20 students.

    We may not reach all students 100% of the time at every given point of the day but we should be able to reach all of those students enough to raise their curiosity enough to get them there and willing to do the drudgery parts.

    I had another college professor that was smart. I had taken this type of class 4 other times and I was angry at having to take it again. There was nothing a teacher who was not even an expert in the matter could teach me. It was not relevant to me and I didn't want to be there. He subtly got me thinking about topics that were outside his scope and doing projects that appealed to me rather than forcing the same model. Now that I think about it, this has happened more than once. Letting me have some say in the subject matter was quite an effective way to turn me from resentful to an engaged learner.

    I think teachers need to continue to reflect. Students do have the ability to be curious. Some of the other stuff is maturity issues, not lack of curiosity issues. Some of it is a continued need to reflect on outdated practices.

    You may dismiss me if you choose but I have taught a variety of grades, even outside elementary. What you are describing is not a new phenomenon. The trick is to recognize we don't always have the answers for every learner at all times but we should never stop looking at how we are contributing to the process as well. Some practices are outdated and not reflective of the changing world in which we live.
     
  27. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,534
    Likes Received:
    2,588

    Feb 17, 2013

    I agree with you. Sitting and listening is an academic skill, just like note-taking and a million other things. We are doing a disservice to our students if we don't teach them how to do it effectively and expect them to do it from time to time.
     
  28. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    9,154
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 17, 2013

    Just to clarify my position, I am not against teaching academic behaviors. The process is more complex than that. That isn't the end all to the process. I doubt anyone thinks it is but sometimes it comes across like that.
     
  29. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Feb 17, 2013

    “Tell me and I'll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I'll understand.”
    :thumb:
     
  30. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Feb 17, 2013

    quoted time and time again, but I'm not sure I buy into it. I know it wasn't always the case for me or my own children. I can't tell you how many labs I participated in while in college that seemed totally meaningless to me. Some were awesome and I did learn from them. Some were total time-wasters because I had completely learned the topic in lecture the day before. I was simply going through the motions. Some made no sense to me and it wasn't until I spent time alone with the material later, studying the textbook, that I got the concept it was trying to drive home.

    I did a research paper in graduate school about an actual scientific study on inquiry-based learning. Not a pseudo-study. It showed that in all but one case inquiry-based learning had either no impact or a negative impact on student mastery. Often students would frustrate themselves past the point of caring or they would learn something incorrectly that had to be fixed during lecture. The one middle school that did show a significant increase in test scores was in the mid-west if I remember correctly.

    So, based on that, personal experience (with my own learning and that of my students) and comments from my coworkers, telling students can be just as effective as showing and having them show me.
     
  31. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Feb 17, 2013

    Better yet, a balanced approach.
     
  32. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    7,946
    Likes Received:
    3

    Feb 17, 2013

    Yeah, a "maybe" needs be inserted in each of the circumstances...maybe I'll understand. :)

    I agree with Lucy and Ceasar who said listening to "lectures" is a skill. Ad I doubt too many people "lecture" anyhow...most teachers don't just stand at the front or back of the room and blah, blah, blah.
     
  33. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,330
    Likes Received:
    572

    Feb 17, 2013

    this.

    way back when, when I planned chapters at a time, I tried to make sure that I met all types of learning needs for each chapter. I don't pay as much attention now because those plans are set for the most part. As I modify those plans I do try to make sure that I keep things mixed up quite a bit.
     
  34. Curiouscat

    Curiouscat Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 18, 2013

    When my employer is giving me directions or explaining new procedures I am expected to sit, listen, and remember. When we are brainstorming ideas at work to solve a problem I am expected to sit and pay attention. So, yes, being able to attend to a lecture is preparing a child for the real world.

    Also, there are some things that have to be said in order for a child to begin learning. There are only so many ways you can teach some subjects.

    For example, in math I give a story problem. I ask the students to find more than one way to solve the problem. When we return to the carpet to share our solutions, one goal is for the students to learn from each other as they explain their different ways of thinking. How else can I achieve this goal? Students must learn to sit and listen to others!
     
  35. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    2,841
    Likes Received:
    321

    Feb 19, 2013

    Oh, my gosh, I felt like a clown today with all the engagement strategies I was pulling! My kids usually aren't rude about it, but I swear I am seeing them gloss over faster and faster. Every 2 minutes it was like....turn and talk to your neighbor!....share out!.....pulling popsicle sticks!.....tell me what you think about that!.....listen everyone else's thinking!.....They cannot hear me talk for more than 3 minutes and that is so shameful.
     
  36. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,948
    Likes Received:
    1,141

    Feb 19, 2013

    I agree that a balanced approach is the best. We cannot ignore the fact that media does change things in how we do things. I even noticed that my attention span is shorter, I get distracted, get bored or tired of doing 1 task easier. For example right now I have about 4 tabs open on my laptop (looking for a teaching job, Facebook, Pinterest, this one and Google search) and I'm going back and forth. And I'm watching / listening to TV.
    If I had to have one window (tab) open, like back in the day when we had AOL and could only do one thing at a time, I'd go crazy.

    So just imagine students growing up with this type of technology and multimedia chaos. So it is better to vary the activities, get them involved, appeal to multiple intelligences, group work, partner work, class discussions, etc.

    But we also need to make sure that they are going to be ready for what's beyond high school: a job, college, and life in general. They do need to be able to sit for 40 minutes or more, read text independently, understand it, take notes and answer questions. (all this without getting up, starting talking, etc). This is how it's gonna be in college, lots of reading on their own, more than 40 minutes.
    They do need to be able to sit and listen to 1 person talking, and pay attention, take notes, or at least really understand it. This is how it's gonna be in college, at a seminar their boss might want them to take, a meeting at their job, etc.

    We don't want them to read independently all the time, or listen to lectures all the time, but they should be able to do it here and there.
     
  37. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,002

    Feb 19, 2013

    I think one or two engagement strategies a day is enough. I try to structure my time in this way:

    1. (5-10 min) Starter which leads into
    2. (10-15 min) Teacher led discussion (i.e. notes, lecture, homework review, etc.)
    3. (5-10 min) Guided Student Practice (i.e. where your engagement strategies and formative assessment might go)
    4. (10-20 min) Independent Student Work (in my class it's usually done in partners or groups, and includes working on reading guides, labs, practice sheets, etc.)

    Things are paced fast enough so once they are bored with the lecture or guided reading, they begin having to practice or perform a formative assessment. Then they get to work on whatever the work is for the day, and they're usually fine with doing this for a while because it can be done in groups and they get their socialization in.

    My only problem is that they socialize too much, and the work doesn't get done!
     
  38. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Messages:
    913
    Likes Received:
    30

    Feb 19, 2013

    I often tell my students, "This isn't the 'Tonight Show' and I ain't Jay Leno."

    Not that I don't vary methods, but I'm not preparing them for work or college if I make classes like a game show. Some things in life are work and education is work. Not one, big rock (or hit-hop) video.
     
  39. greenbay33

    greenbay33 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 25, 2012
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 3, 2013

    :thumb:
     
  40. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,109

    Mar 3, 2013

    Good thing...Jay Leno is on the outs...Jimmy Fallon is taking over.:D
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 177 (members: 2, guests: 151, robots: 24)
test