A little sad

Discussion in 'General Education' started by lucybelle, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Sep 24, 2012

    I've posted about one of my students (7th grade) on here before who is super hyperactive. More than anyone I've ever seen before. She was recently diagnosed with all of the above plus Aspergers. They're putting her on medication starting today.

    I'm a little sad. She is such a happy bubbly kid and she has gotten so much better at focusing in the classroom. Her most recent tests have been mid-80s, not too shabby for any kid! Let alone one who can't focus! These grades won't get her into Med School, but the kid's not going to be a doctor anyways.

    I'm so afraid she's going to lose her personality. I say keep her off her meds and let her have her childhood. I understand there is a place for medication, but I don't think it should be her.

    But I'm no professional.

    I have her again on Wednesday, so I'll get to see any changes.

    :(
     
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  3. applecore

    applecore Devotee

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    Sep 24, 2012

    So sorry to hear that, but there's always a bright side where you'll see her ability to focus and she might actually be able to think clearer instead of having so much going on in her mind at once.

    Here's hoping for the best!
     
  4. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Sep 24, 2012

    The right med at the right dose won't make her lose her personality, but it will bring out her personality. The wrong med or the wrong dose could definitely cause a drastic negative change to either much more hyper or lethargic.

    I don't find this sad. I know she has become better at focusing, but people with disabilities have to expend so much more energy getting to that point than people without the disablity. This takes a huge toll on a person in all aspects of their lives.

    Often when kids with disabilites get home from school they are so mentally exhausted. It impacts their free time or homework time.
     
  5. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Sep 24, 2012

    Yeah hopefully the meds will help. I guess I just base my opinion on the fact that I know lots of people who were on medication during their preteen/teenager years and they feel like they never developed, they never had fun. When they turned 18 they decided to stop taking the pills, and although it's harder for them to focus they actually feel like *themselves*. I also remember a girl in my class who whenever she took her meds she'd be extremely flat-line. I guess they've made improvements since then.
     
  6. newkidinclass

    newkidinclass Rookie

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    Sep 24, 2012

    I really love some of the unschool programs that have surfaced recently. I've looked into starting some of my own programs, but talk myself out of if due to lack of experience and self confidence. Programs like the Sudbury Valley School are really interesting and tend to work for students that struggle in the industrial model. The Kua O Ka La school in Hawaii is another great example.

    About 30% of my students require accomodations in order to fit into the current program. 30%! To me it sounds like the problem is in the program not the student. Our system is so focused on meeting standards and competition that they tend to overlook compassion, happiness and quality of life. I struggle very much with the education industry. I want my students to learn and make progress, but in their own time and to their own abilities. It shouldn't be a race. We're just trying to help kids understand the world around them and provide them with tools to live a meaningful life.
     
  7. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Sep 24, 2012

    Sorry, but I don't see this as sad. I have a nephew with Asperger's. His parents resisted medicating him as long as possible, but the meds he is on now allow him to do the things that any other teenager would be able to do - drive, participate in school activities, be successful in school. The key to proper medication is monitoring.
     
  8. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Sep 24, 2012

    You were understanding... Other teachers, maybe not so much. She has to find her way in the world and learn how to get along in society. It's like anything else... You must at some point understand that while being different is perfectly ok, we all have to succumb to certain societal expectations in order to lead happy, productive lives. In the long run, the goal is for her to be successful in life!:):)
     
  9. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 24, 2012

    I don't have anything useful to add to this conversation but this made me chuckle a bit. On the first day of school my son said, "I had the BEST day ever!!!!!" Ten minutes later it was followed by a 3 hour meltdown.
     
  10. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Sep 24, 2012

    "Zombification" tends only to happen when the student is on the wrong medication or on the wrong dosage (either too high or too low)
     
  11. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Sep 25, 2012

    Hugs to your son and you.
     

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