A little boy with poor motor skills

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by minnie, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. minnie

    minnie Habitué

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    Nov 1, 2009

    I have a student who is bright and sweet and is doing well...except for his motor skills. His cutting and coloring is pretty bad. Besides doing coloring and cutting activities all the time (which gets old), what other activities could I do to help him?

    Also, his handwriting needs a lot of work. He can write all of his letters and numbers. However, when he writes anything on lined paper, his letter kind of just "float" around instead of starting at the top for the uppercase letters and starting at the broken line for the lowercase letters. What activities could I do with him for his handwriting?
     
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  3. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Nov 1, 2009

    Have him cut playdough, then draw lines for him to cut. (He can squeeze the playdough too for strenthening his grip.) Use curvy, zig zig and straight lines for his cutting activities. Do a lot of finger exercises with him. Make him put his hands in a fist then slowly open up his fingers one by one, then speed up the movements. He can try matching up the fingers on his hands, touching them together slowly, then faster and faster. Let him continue coloring everyday and he should get better with practice. Another thing that he can do is get him an old keyboard and let him just punch on the keys for exercising his fingers. Let him zip and unzip zippers, and also let him use tweezers to pick up buttons or beans, etc. These are some of the things can can sharpen his fine motors. He can also use a squeeze ball or one of those stress balls for strengthening his fingers and hands.:D
    Good luck,
    Rebel1
     
  4. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    I had an Occupational Therapist in my class last week giving me activities for fine motor skills.

    - ripping paper into little pieces. I give the kids paper and a cut out. They make collages by filling the cut outs with the paper.

    - Making letters out of playdough. Rolling the dough into snakes and use their fingers to cut the ends.

    -Nuts and bolts. Have different sized nuts and bolts to screw and unscrew.

    - Pasting using paste in a screw open jar and a paste brush. Holding and using the paste brush uses the same fine motor skills as a pencil or crayon.

    -Transfer beans from one cup to another using a teaspoon.

    -Use a spray bottle to water plants

    -Use eyedroppers to transfer water. Mixing colored water is fun.
     
  5. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Nov 1, 2009


    We use tweezers to transfer craft pompoms from one cup to another.
     
  6. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Nov 1, 2009

    Dzenna,
    Are those pugs? They look so adorable.:angel:
    R1
     
  7. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    The front one is a pug and the back one is a pug chihuahua mix. We call her a "chug".
     
  8. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    A pug & chihuahua mix? Have you seen the beagle & pug mix yet? I haven't. I am taking care of my son's pug and I've accepted the fact that he's not going to grow out of his facial:Dexpressions. He makes me laugh with his snoring and bark. It will be very hard if my son decides to take him back.:(
    Rebel1
     
  9. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    I have seen the Pug/Beagle mix. They are really cute. The face looks like a pug but the body is like a beagle. They call them Puggles. Does your pug sleep on the bed? Ours do and they both snore!
     
  10. minnie

    minnie Habitué

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    Nov 1, 2009

    Thank you! What great ideas! When should I let him do these things? My other students are doing fine. Should I just go ahead and let them all do it. I don't want this students to miss out on what the others are doing. I could do it during centers...
     
  11. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Nov 2, 2009

    Why not? When he sees the other children participate too then he'll jump right in, (I hope) and nobody would feel left out.
    Good luck,
    Rebel1
     
  12. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Nov 2, 2009

    I agree with Rebel... just work that kind of stuff into your centers as activities... the other kids might be OK with their cutting and drawing skills, but everyone can benefit from the activities :)

    Other ideas... have them get things (Snacks, sequins, pom poms, etc) out of dixie cups... because that forces them to use pincer fingers to get thingss instead of a whole hand.

    double or triple-seal fingerpaint, shaving cream, or hair gel in ziplock bags... kids use their fingers to trace/draw letters, numbers, or shapes in them.

    doing ANYTING upright on an easel or board rather than on the table... strengthens the writs and arm muscles, which we use for writing.

    If it's grip on a pencil... break them in half and use stubby ones. That forces a more mature grasp, because they can't get their whoel hand around them.

    My OTs always love kids to use chalk, I think it's something about the pressure needed to write with it appropriately.
     
  13. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    I agree with the other posters. These are great ideas for your centers. Nubbie pieces of chalk and small slate boards are fantastic.
     
  14. Lumi

    Lumi Companion

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    Nov 2, 2009

    I highly recommend Marianne Gibbs and her website http://writeoutofthebox.com/ everything I learned about fine motor coordination and development I learned from her through attending her workshops at conferences I attended.

    Stacking pennies is also a good thing for them to practice.
     
  15. Ambrosegirl84

    Ambrosegirl84 Companion

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    Nov 5, 2009

    You mentioned stubby pencils. I'm wondering about those, actually! My 2nd and 3rd graders like to see how small they can get their pencils, but I was afraid it might hurt their grip as they're learning cursive. Should I let them use their pencils entirely up?
     

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