A few ?s about early childhood education certification

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Miranda0216, May 25, 2010.

  1. Miranda0216

    Miranda0216 New Member

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    May 25, 2010

    Hi everyone :)
    I've always wanted to become a Preschool teacher and I've recently started pursuing going to school to get my Early Childhood Education certificate as a starting point. So today I called my local community college and asked them how to go about getting it. They told me to take two classes, called "Maryland State Child Day Care Training Certification: Child Growth and Development, Part I" and "Maryland State Child Day Care Training Certification: Programs and Activities, Part II"

    So my question is... is the Early Childhood Education certificate just another way of saying Day Care Training Certificate? Are they the same thing or two different things??? Because I want to be able to work in a preschool setting, not just a daycare...

    I'd appreciate ANY feedback at all, I have to register for the class by June 5th so I need as much info as possible.

    Thanks everyone :)

    PS. I'm going to call the school again to ask them, just to be sure, but I thought I'd ask you guys for a second opinion.
     
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  3. WhatchaDoin?

    WhatchaDoin? Comrade

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    May 25, 2010

    You might want to check with MSDE (Maryland State Dept. of Ed.)

    What the community college is suggesting will get you, more or less, a certificate. This is for (I think) 90 hours of training.

    Some preschools are looking for teachers with Associate Degrees - also available at many community colleges in Maryland. These courses are credited, and may be a bit more expensive. An Associates may make the difference between being a lead teacher and an assistant.

    You may consider checking with a couple of preschools in your area - mainly schools where you would like to work.
     
  4. teacher36

    teacher36 Comrade

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    May 27, 2010

    I have a masters degree in both early childhood education and childhood education. My early childhood degree certifies me to teach children from birth to grade 2. My childhood education certificate allows me to teach from grade 1 through grade 6. I'm in NY. I'm pretty sure every state is different so I agree that you should contact your department of ed to find out the requirements. Good Luck!
     
  5. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    May 27, 2010

    My Early Childhood Certification is from Pre K to 3rd. It's an actual endorsement called a ZA. I had to take different classed at my 4yr college.
     
  6. Michael S.

    Michael S. Companion

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    May 27, 2010

    I'm an elem. ed. major and was always concerned with school age centers, not preschool. However, I pasted the regulations from the MSDE below. I would def. recommend getting an A.A.T degree in Early Childhood Education (not just an A.A.). The degree is seamlessly transferrable to any public university within the state of Maryland (or it is supposed to be). Daycares and preschools are considered the same thing according to the MSDE where centers are concerned. If you want to work in a public school setting, you will need to be a certified teacher (4 year degree & pass the Praxis). Different requirements may be required to work in a parochial, private, or nonprofit setting (depending on the organization). The term daycare is a term that I strongly dislike. In my opinion, a negative connotation is associated with it. A lot of community colleges are not offering certificates anymore and you will just display your transcript for evidence that you took the course. Whatever you do, try to take courses for college credit.

    If the college is CCBC, PM me and I may be able to give you more information about the institution itself.

    .09 Child Care Teachers in Preschool Centers.
    A. To qualify as a child care teacher in a preschool center, an individual shall be 19 years old or older, and meet one of the following criteria:
    (1) The individual holds or has successfully completed:
    (a) A high school diploma, a certificate of high school equivalence, or courses for credit from an accredited college or university;
    (b) 6 semester hours or 90 clock hours or their equivalent of approved pre-service training, or hold the Child Development Associate Credential issued by the Child Development Associate National Credentialing Program;
    (c) 9 clock hours of approved pre-service training in communicating with staff, parents, and the public; and
    (d) At least one of the following:
    (i) 1 year of experience working under supervision primarily with preschoolers in a licensed child care center, nursery school, church-operated school, or similar setting, or as a registered family child care provider caring for preschoolers; or
    (ii) 1 year of college, or a combination of experience and college that together are equivalent to 1 year;
    (2) The individual holds an associate's or higher degree with approved courses in early childhood education;
    (3) The individual qualified before July 1, 2008, as a child care teacher in a preschool center and has been continuously employed since that time at the same or another preschool center; or
    (4) The individual:
    (a) Has been approved as a teacher by the Department for early childhood in nursery school through third grade; or
    (b) Is certified by the Department or by any other state for early childhood in nursery school through third grade.
    B. A child care teacher in a preschool center shall:
    (1) According to the individual's professional development plan, complete approved continued training, at the rate of at least 12 clock hours per full year of employment as a child care teacher, that consists of a:
    (a) Minimum of 6 clock hours of core of knowledge training; and
    (b) Maximum of 6 clock hours of elective training; and
    (2) Document completion of the continued training on the professional development plan.
    C. Unless qualified by the office before July 1, 2008, to supervise a group of infants or toddlers, a child care teacher wishing to supervise a group of infants or toddlers shall:
    (1) Meet the requirements of §A of this regulation and have completed 3 semester hours of approved training, or the equivalent, related exclusively to the care of infants and toddlers; or
    (2) Be 19 years old or older and:
    (a) Meet the requirements of §A(1)(a), (c), and (d) of this regulation; and
    (b) Have completed 6 semester hours of approved training, or the equivalent, related exclusively to the care of infants and toddlers.
     
  7. annetxa

    annetxa Rookie

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    May 29, 2010

    You could always get your CDA (Child Development Associate)....that is what I am doing. You should be able to take courses locally and online.
     
  8. KarenPreK

    KarenPreK Companion

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    Jun 4, 2010

    First, contact some schools where you would be interested in working. If you think you may relocate, contact other schools by email. Ask them what they require for a teacher in their school. Where I live, most day care employees have a CDA I think. Because most of the day cares where I live have the state Pre-K program, those teachers have Bachelor degrees. Most private schools don't necessarily require anything, but they don't pay much, either. There are 2 private schools where I live that require a Bachelor's degree to teach Pre-K, and they pay accordingly. All of the public schools also require a Bachelor's. (I'm in Georgia.)

    If you don't want to get a Bachelor's right now, I would recommend you make sure whatever classes you take would transfer to a 4-year university, just in case you later decide to pursue it.
     

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