A caution for new student teachers

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by swansong1, Jan 13, 2010.

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  1. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jan 13, 2010

    My student teacher has learned his first hard lesson about the politics of working in a school. We share our lunch table with the other ESE class. My ST had his first day of doing lunch duty alone and a few of the students in the other class were bickering. He came up with a plan to deal with it on subsequent days (he made a seating chart). The next day when he dropped off our class at lunch he made the mistake of telling the other teacher (a 25 year veteran) how he (the ST) felt all the children should be seated at lunch. This teacher was not very appreciative and now my ST has made the other teacher quite angry. So, now my ST has learned to be very careful who he offers suggestions to because some people are not quite as flexible as others. I told him that at least he learned this during student teaching and not when he has his own room. I won't even address the issue of how this other teacher treated my ST but I did handle it out of his earshot.
     
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  3. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    OUCH! That was a painful lesson to learn.

    That was one thing I struggled with during my internship; I had rules I felt the kids should follow, but these rules weren't reinforced by the other teachers, so I felt very limited in how much I could actually apply the rules in my classroom, since I was only going to be there less than half the school year. I finally did implement and enforced a couple of rules that corresponded to rules my CT or the school system already had in place, but that hadn't been enforced to that point.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    A good idea is only as good as other teachers' willingness to buy into it.

    I'm glad he learned this lesson in a "safer" setting than a permanent position.
     
  5. Traveller698

    Traveller698 Rookie

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    Thanks for the tip... I'm nervous about my upcoming student teaching experience and since I'm working at this as a 2nd career I'm hoping I can control my impulsivity to comment on and correct "others".
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    One thing that I think student teachers and new teachers need to remember is that they don't know everything about everything. I'm not trying to sound harsh.

    The thing is, seasoned teachers sort of know what's up. Of course some of them are bad teachers who mentally checked out years ago, but most seasoned teachers have used their past experience to shape their current behavior and choices.

    If you're new to the game, I think a good approach would be to ask a teacher why they're doing a particular thing a certain way. Not only can that approach teach you something new or something that you didn't consider, but it can also force the seasoned teacher to really evaluate why he or she is doing something (and possibly whether he or she needs to change it).

    It's one thing to ask a teacher why he or she does something; it's another thing entirely to correct a seasoned teacher or otherwise imply that they're doing something wrong.

    Student teachers and new teachers would be wise to sit back, observe, and ask questions.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    One thing that I think student teachers and new teachers need to remember is that they don't know everything about everything. I'm not trying to sound harsh.

    The thing is, seasoned teachers sort of know what's up. Of course some of them are bad teachers who mentally checked out years ago, but most seasoned teachers have used their past experience to shape their current behavior and choices.

    If you're new to the game, I think a good approach would be to ask a teacher why they're doing a particular thing a certain way. Not only can that approach teach you something new or something that you didn't consider, but it can also force the seasoned teacher to really evaluate why he or she is doing something (and possibly whether he or she needs to change it).

    It's one thing to ask a teacher why he or she does something; it's another thing entirely to correct a seasoned teacher or otherwise imply that they're doing something wrong.

    Student teachers and new teachers would be wise to sit back, observe, and ask questions.
     
  8. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I like that idea of asking a teacher why they do a particular thing. I will be sure to pass on the tip to my ST.
     
  9. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    My team teacher is new. I am too as a teacher but not to the school. I have to wince sometimes when she comes across as too knowing or being blunt about her take on things. I tell her that she is perfectly right but she has to build a relationship with these people first before they are willing to listen to her. So don't tell people how to do their job or what they are doing wrong. I didn't like her at first either and was quite intimidated. Once I got to know her and she got to know me, we got along just fine. That first impression was too strong. Then yesterday we had a discussion about how to approach the boss. I told her the good rule of thumb is to let the boss think it was really her idea and like the boss is helping her. She wasn't too thrilled with my statement and talked about professionalism and some other stuff. I told her first before she gets to that though she has to build a rapport with her. After that, she can ask for the world and get it. I told her this also works for the rest of the staff too. You have to build your relationships first.
     
  10. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    I think that is perfect advice for everyone! Thanks for sharing. I only visited my classroom, but I have already asked tons of questions and lots of why or how. It is definitely good advice to ask why and to build the relationship prior to doing something or asking to change something without an understanding of why it is the way it is.
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Tone's important too: the question needs to come across as something other than a challenge.
     
  12. beatlebug731

    beatlebug731 Comrade

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    I had to learn the same lesson. I had a coop who was very set in her ways. Each time I asked if I could change something to make it work better for me, she said no. It was tough, I had to succeed at doing things her way. It's not that I didn't want to please her, I'm just not her.
     
  13. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jan 14, 2010

    I student taught a looong time ago. My CT was also quite inflexible. I guess that's why I'm pretty laid back with my student teachers. I want them to develop their own way of doing things, as long as they achieve the results that we want.
     
  14. beatlebug731

    beatlebug731 Comrade

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    I have to admit, though, she really taught me a lot.
     
  15. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    I think it's totally bogus that the ST has supposedly "learned a lesson" by this experience.

    One of the biggest problems in education is that we all do stuff the same way we've always done it and nobody ever asks why. Then you get these old "veterans" who bite the heads off of anyone who challenges them with a new idea.

    I'm sorry, but if a student teacher ever questioned the way I did something, I would NEVER make them feel like they should have kept their mouth shut or not made the suggestion. I might tell them they were wrong, but then I would also be obligated to have a good reason as to why they were wrong as well.

    Personally, I think the ST is owed an apology. I also think that anyone who believes that new teachers should be "cautioned" about offending veterans with new ideas is part of the problem and not the solution.
     
  16. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    And I really think the veteran teacher should have to explain why she thinks a seating chart at lunch time is a bad idea. If I were having behavior issues at the lunch table, that would be one idea I might try. It's a perfectly REASONABLE suggestion.

    But that shouldn't matter. The fact is that new ideas should never be stifled by institutionalized mediocrity.
     
  17. SPECIALEDMAN

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    In my opinion and based on what I’ve read, the ST was simply attempting to be helpful and thought that he/she had something that would help the situation. ST’s are generally excited, eager, and I would imagine only mean well.

    So with that said, the “seasoned veteran” teacher that’s been around the block a few times should have enough experience and understanding that this is all part of the growing process and the ST is only trying to offer assistance and maybe contribute something helpful. After all, they already have a lot of mixed feelings about their ability.

    No disrespect, but I would hate to think that folks had to be careful and walk on eggshells around me because I was a long-term pretentious teacher that “knew it all” and didn’t want to hear anything out of newbie’s. I pray that I will always remember that I too was a ST at one point in my career and simply smile.

    I dare to say that because it’s in a woman’s nature to have concern for feelings they typically hand down organizational behavior to other females and develop a hierarchy within the workplace that often breeds and feeds the pretentious “queen” teacher that everyone hates to love. A good thing gone bad.
     
  18. SPECIALEDMAN

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    Well spoken Sarge. Beckysuek -Tell that male ST to hang in there and don’t feed the animals! lol
     
  19. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    I don't know, I think it is more about respect. I think certainly anybody should be able to ask questions and it is fine to even say I will get back to you with a response. However, I sympathize with the teachers because here is a new person taking over their classroom. That must be so difficult- I just met my CT and I do not have problems asking her questions or anything, but I know to be respectful and use a kind tone and I think that was the key message. Even my college in our ST handbook tells us to tread lightly- you honestly cannot go in there midsemester and just change everything and completely take over without the support and understanding of your CT and I think that should go both ways with open communications. At the same time though, Sarge, I would love to be your ST- let me try everything, that is what I want, however, I am not going to jeopardize my relationship and support of my CT- ultimately she has a say in my grade and she is the one opening her classroom door to me and allowing me to take over her class. My CT is a self confessed control freak and it is going to be hard for her to give her class to me, however I think she is willing to do it and has already given me a class, something she has never taught her K students and thus has no preconceived idea about how it should be taught. Therefore making it perfect to take over first. I appreciate all the view points here, thanks for sharing. It is always great to see many sides.
     
  20. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    The way that this situation was explained, the issue here is not that the ST asked or offered to make a seating chart. The issue is that the ST simply did it (which is good and shows initiative) and apparently informed the teacher that this is how things were going to be from here on out (which, in my opinion, is presumptuous for a new, inexperienced teacher).

    The problem here was in the delivery of the "suggestion".

    It may be neither nice nor pretty, but the fact is that politics exist in the world of education...as they do virtually everywhere. Part of being successful as a teacher is knowing how to navigate those politics.
     
  21. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    This discussion reminds me of when I was a grad student studying Latin intensively. I had been studying Latin for at least 10 years by that point and I knew a lot of stuff.

    There was a guy in the undergraduate Latin program at my very large university. We had several classes together because the upper level undergrad classes and the grad classes were sometimes lumped together--we often studied the same topic, but we had different and more in-depth assignments.

    One of the classes we shared was a class on Lucan, who is a lesser-known Roman who wrote about the Civil War. I had to do a presentation on an excerpt from the piece, which included a literal translation of the work. After my presentation, this student emailed me to let me know that I had mistakenly translated a section. He went on to explain to me exactly what mistakes I had made and how I could correct them in the future.

    The thing is, he wasn't right. He thought he knew all the rules of Latin grammar. While he certainly knew a lot of them, he didn't know all of them, especially the special exceptions that happen throughout Latin and with particular authors. He wasn't aware that Lucan does XYZ when every other poet does ABC. A few classes later, the professor spent an entire day talking about the very topic, even bringing up my section as an example.

    While I appreciate that this guy was trying to help, there was something about the way he addressed the issue that rubbed me the wrong way.

    I'm certainly not a know-it-all in life in general or Latin specifically, but I do know a few things. Had this guy approached me in a different way, such as "I thought that..." or "How come you...", it would have been a better situation all around. As it was, I was irritated and I never cared to work with that guy again (because I thought he was arrogant and over confident).
     
  22. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Jan 14, 2010

    Being a successful adult, in any career, means being respectful to those who came before you. As I read it, the ST didn't just ask questions or share ideas, he just did something, then had the know-it-all attitude that doesn't come across well in any situation. Yes, new ideas and initiative are good things, but when you're brand new to a situation, and even when you're not, it's still important to be polite.

    This is a lesson that's not limited to the inexperienced either. Many years ago, my department head at the college retired and was replaced with a woman who was very energetic and motivated. The problem was that she started implementing new policies without talking to the rest of us. We resented her greatly for that. We'd been running ourselves without a boss for a year, and were doing a pretty good job, if the student evaluations were any reflection. Eventually, the situation got bad, and it was brought to the dean. This person eventually became a decent boss, and I really liked her at the end, but it was a pretty tense begining.

    Something else I learned a long time ago: You can say anything to anybody, and it will be well received, you just have to phrase it "right". It's a good lesson to learn. People skills are a necessity in any job.
     
  23. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sometimes things are done in a particular way because that's the way that works. Other things have been tried before and not worked.

    In other words, it's entirely possible that the school somehow functioned before this particular student teacher showed up.

    I think that suggestions are fine. But taking command of a situation you've just walked into is beyond arrogant; it's ignorant. (All Alexander Haig jokes can now commence.)

    In this particular instance, it was the student teacher's first day. Kids were bickering at lunch. I'm fairly sure that this isn't the first time it's ever happened, and that, in all likliehood there was a procedure in place. In fact, the odds are good that the procedure was to let the kids learn to settle their own differences-- "bickering" is part of growing up and learning to express your opinion respectfully is a skill that must be practiced. And they were students in the OTHER CLASS, not his. Apparently no one was in danger of getting hurt; they were kids acting like kids. Coming in with a heavy-handed fix is overkill in my opinion.

    I think the correct response on the part of the student teacher would have been to ask the other teacher: "What do you usually do when this happens?"
     
  24. SPECIALEDMAN

    SPECIALEDMAN Companion

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    I gathered from the original post:

    #1 The student teacher (was doing lunchroom duty alone) had some behavior issues and came up with a plan to stop the behavior.

    #2 He expressed his opinion of how the seating chart may correct the behavior to another teacher the next day that I assume had lunch duty that day.


    I see disturbing key words throughout this post i.e. “quite angry”, “very careful”, “mistake of telling”, “not very appreciative”. This is a disease that lingers in so many of our schools. “Tiptoe around the veterans because they have experienced it all and are no longer accepting any ideas, especially from a dumb@$$ ST”.

    As a teacher, this guy will have to come up with plans to correct or encourage a behavior on a daily basis. Hat’s off to you for not simply standing by with the “there not my kids”, “I’m only here for a while”, “Let the real teachers worry about it” attitude. He took the initiative to try to do something to help.

    I applaud you ST man!!

    Please pass this along to him.
     
  25. guest_teacher

    guest_teacher Rookie

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    Thank you, SPECIALEDMAN. I couldn't have said it better myself!

    Veteran teachers should be open to new ideas. I have worked in several "failed" schools, and though I wouldn't put all or even a large part of the blame on the veteran teachers who work there, it is fair to say that those veteran teachers have shown themselves to be less than successful.

    Veteran teachers should also leave space for student teachers (whom they are often paid to train) to apply the theories taught in teacher preparation programs. Let us imagine that the student teacher's idea is completely without merit. He cannot learn this from being told not to try the idea; he can learn it if he is allowed to try the idea and assess the results.

    It bothers me that credence is automatically accorded to veteran teachers, who, given the certification requirements and professional standards of the past, may not be as well educated or as flexible as new teachers. The following conditions come to mind: "life credential" (no need to renew), "Column 1" (zero continuing education/professional development units), HOUSSE (unable to pass a current subject matter exam), and "Plan to Remedy" (not trained to teach English Learners).
     
  26. SunnyGal

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    I agree! If the ST went about this rudely, then that's one thing, but I think veteran teachers should be willing to listen to the ideas of STs and new teachers. I have some close friends at work who have been teaching a lot longer than I have, and we are constantly swapping ideas and tips. I'm not at all afraid to offer up suggestions. Some of the methods that I was taught while in college are much different than how my older co-workers were taught. It's great to be able to take some "veteran" views and mix them up with some newer theories. The student teachers we have at our school have been coming up with some great lessons -- I've only been out of college for a couple years, and they're doing all kinds of new stuff!
     
  27. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    During his lunch duty, he shared how he felt the students should be seated to resolve a problem. So long as he approached this in a "I was thinking about this yesterday afternoon and thought that it might work if students were seated differently" manner and wasn't rude in the least, then I absolutely agree with Sarge and those who have posted similar sentiments.
     
  28. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    While I agree with the sentiments expressed that the ST should be encouraged to show initiative and offer new ideas (in a respectful manner), I also have to agree with some the others that politics in the workplace - whether good or bad - are a fact of life, no matter what job you have.

    I've been in several different work environments since graduating college and almost every place had "one of those workers" that everyone else had to tread lightly around. Now, unfortunately, my personality it such that, when I'm warned about a hornet's nest, my first instinct is to go poke it with a stick. I resist the urge as often as I can, but there is always that part of me that just wants to challenge the person because I feel they are being ridiculous and shouldn't get the "free pass" just because others are afraid of their terrible tempers.

    That being said, however, I have been quite successful in overcoming the supposed barriers around these grumpity people. I was warned by my CT that the school secretary was someone I needed to be very cautious of. Once again, my first thought was to grab a stick and go poke her (figuratively speaking - not literally), but I'm old enough and wise enough to realize that is just asking for trouble. So I go and make friends with the secretary instead and I never had a problem with her. This same method has worked in every other work situation as well.

    I still think it is ridiculous for some people to be that way, but the fact remains that some people ARE that way and, whether we like it or not, we have to act a little differently around them. THAT is the "lesson" I think the ST learned. NOT that the other teacher's behavior or reaction was acceptable, but that such reactions are one of the job hazards that come with teaching or any other profession. Learning how to deal with those types of coworkers is always a valuable lesson.
     
  29. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I love initiative too but when trying to fix problems often new people (I just mean new to that environment) aren't always aware of what has happened previously and what has already been tried.
     
  30. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Well, then unless there's a sign on the wall of the cafeteria that says all children have a right to sit where they please, then the ST still did not error in any way by making a suggestion.
     
  31. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Here's a story.

    When I was in the Air Force, (a new airman with very few stripes), we were discussing safety issues regarding flight crew moving about the plane while it was taxiing. Some guys had fallen and hurt themselves taking the chains off of cargo while the plane was still moving. But this was sometimes required, especially in combat situations. I raised my hand and said "Why don't the pilots just be more careful about making sharp turns on their way from the runway?"

    Everyone laughed except the squadron commander.
     
  32. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    There seems to be a lot of focus on the reaction of the vetera teacher without taking into consideration the reason why the veteran reacted that way. As Alice and mmswm pointed out, it's very possible this teacher has tried seating arrangements in the past and it didn't do any good. There also seems to be some resentment towards the statement that the ST learned a lesson. Well, like it or not, he did learn a valuable lesson about how not to handle a situation in the workplace.

    This was his first day being on lunch duty alone and some kids from one class (a class he is not involved with, btw) were bickering, so his solution is to hand out assigned seats for the entire cafeteria?! :confused: I'm a newb myself, but I can certainly understand why the seasoned teacher didn't like being approached with this idea.

    First of all, the ST wants to rearrange all the seats in the cafeteria because he couldn't handle one group during one duty. Sorry kid - you don't have a bunch of Opie Taylor clones that will just sit quietly and say "Yes, sir" or "No, sir" to your requests.

    Secondly, the kids bickering weren't in his class. I imagine the seasoned teacher would have been upset at any teacher coming to her with suggestions on how she could handle her students and their behavior better. But, hey, I'm new and maybe I'm wrong. All those in support of the ST - look for some incidents of kids in other classes "acting up", then go to their teacher the next day with a list of suggestions about what he/she can do to control the kids better and let us know how that goes.

    Finally, the ST is implementing solution to his problem that requires the compliance of other teachers. In other words, he is saying "I had a problem with the kids yesterday, and this is what I think we should do to fix it". BZZZZZZZ! Wrong answer, but thank you for playing. If you have the problem, you need to be the one that fixes it.

    I faced a similar situation during my own internship. My last class of the day was especially rowdy one afternoon, so I finally told them they would have Silent Lunch the next day - the whole class. The only problem with that punishment is that they aren't in MY room when they go to lunch, they are with their homeroom teacher. They go to lunch 5 minutes before our homeroom group. I told the other teacher about their actions and the discipline I had given and I offered to "swap" groups with her the next day at lunch (let her take MY homeroom group to lunch and I would take hers). That way, SHE would not be responsible for enforcing MY discipline. She said "No,that's alright. I'll be glad to tell them." I said "OK" and went about my classes for the day. When I got to lunch, her students were sitting in their regular spots and talking away with each other. The other teacher looked at me when I sat down and said "Oh my gosh, I completely forgot!" I told her that was fine. It was my responsibility to enforce the discipline I had given, so we would just "swap" groups the next day as we had discussed.

    I was a little upset the teacher hadn't followed through with what she said she would do, but then I realized, it isn't her responsibility to take care of something *I* come up with. I just told the students that afternoon that their punishment still applied and would be enforced the next day.

    I do give the ST credit for showing initiative and trying to find a solution to the problem, but the lesson he learned is that there is a "right way" and a "wrong way" to present new ideas.
     
  33. beatlebug731

    beatlebug731 Comrade

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    Well said Cerek!
    :yeahthat:
     
  34. Toak

    Toak Cohort

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    During my second student teaching placement, I was with a substitute nearly the entire time. The sub changed the seating and put the worst behavioral problem student next to the only kid in the class he could feed off of. She was the only one who I thought shouldn't be near him.

    I didn't say anything though and thinking back, I presume she did it because that girl was the only one in the class the boy had the chance of befriending. She was also willing to help him at times
     
  35. S.W.

    S.W. New Member

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    It all depends on the tone that the student teacher approached the veteran teacher with.

    If it was presented as a suggestion, then the veteran teacher is in the wrong for over-reacting. If it was presented as the new plan that all the teachers should be following, then the student teacher was in the wrong for not being respectful.

    The original post is not clear enough to know which of these is true.
     
  36. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

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    Jan 13, 2011

    :(
    There is some merit to your statements; however, depending on how the ST went about suggesting an idea, there should be NO reason not to have input. Even veteran teacher can still learn things and change. My CT (years ago, now) was a 32+ year vet, and he brought in some of my ideas when he took back over the class. These new teachers coming in to the field bring with them a closer mindset to their students and can relate on the kids level better sometimes. If he saw that something may work better, he has the right to mention it. With that said, though, he should have brought it up with his CT instead of the other teacher. That way the CT could either guide him to bring it up without "correcting" the other teacher or stear him completely clear of the subject. I kind of feel sorry for the guy!

    Think of it this way STs: If you have an idea that you think may work better, talk to your CT 1ST, and ask questions - take a real interest in the whys and hows what is being done works/doesn't work. Also, by talking to the CT, you learn the ins and outs of the politics of your school environment.
     
  37. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Jan 13, 2011

    One thing that I am curious about. ST has obviously changed since I did it (15 years ago). We were forbidden to have control of any kids by ourselves. We did duty, but with our Master Teacher. So I'm curious about him having duty by himself. Is that typical now with ST?
     
  38. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jan 13, 2011

    Our student teachers are not allowed to be alone with the students.
     
  39. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Jan 13, 2011


    I completely agree with you! As a student teacher you MUST show confidence in your actions! Not walk on egg shells because you MIGHT offend a veteran teacher. I had things I was required to do as part of my ST and my CT wouldn't let me...Thus I got downgraded and almost didn't graduate.

    Teachers and schools should NOT take on STs unless they are willing to have the way they operate questioned and changed. STs are supposed to "try" some of the things they have learned about in theory classes. My CT was clossed to anything other then rigid rows and 100% desk work---all done alone while she sat at her desk doing paper work.

    STs are supposed to be proactive, this ST saw a problem and worked on fixing it. I give him credit for that. STs are not just there to "sit back, observe, and ask questions." The job of a ST is to try things they have seen before, been told about in methods class, try things they think might work...and not be afraid to fall flat on their face. You don't learn by just observing and doing things the way veteran teachers do things.

    My CT was a vet. I learned NOTHING by siting back, observing, and asking her "why." I learned when I stopped being afraid of doing things in a new way and fixing problems when I see them.

    This ST was let to do lunch on his own. That meant he was in charge. Sure maybe he could have told this teacher, I had this problem, and this is how I dealt with it. By telling her he was likely hoping his authority would be reinforced. Instead this teacher choose to say that his authority was nothing and the students would not need to listen to him, because he didn't do it her way.

    Would this veteran teacher have acted this way to a school aid. Quiet frankly seating charts in the lunchroom is NOT a "new" idea. Most schools have them, usually it is by last name, per class. And his idea cut down on problems they should use it.

    A veteran teacher can always learn more. Once an educator, a ST, new teacher, or veteran decides they have learned all they can it is time for them to find another profession.
     
  40. Lindager

    Lindager Companion

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    Jan 13, 2011

    I am not sure about the way the ST went about his suggestion but I have to agree he learned a valuable lesson. It does not matter what type of workplace you are in education, manufacturing or executive. All involve groups of people and in all you need to learn the ins and outs of the group dynamics and politics before you stick your foot in your mouth.

    When I worked in a lab at one point I was the only employee. I had been with my boss for more then 10 years either full or part time and we had a very good rapport. For a new project we needed a new full time employee, i helped interview and pick the person we tryed. After only about a month in the job this new (young kid) decided that he knew the best way to handle a problem with the lab floor. Not only did he make this discovery himself he then decided to implement it himself on a day that I was not there. When I came in the next day and commented that the result were a big problem he told me they were not a problem for him and that I only had a problem because I dragged my feet when I walked.:woot: Wellin another 30 days when this young mans probation was up it was not difficult for me to convince the boss this guy had to go. Of course this was not the only thing he did wrong, but he made a bad impression on me and it did color the way I looked at everything else he did. This was the only person my dear late boss ever fired in his over 50 years of work and over 25 of owning his own Co.

    My point is I am new to teaching and when I get a chance to ST I will be very sure I understand who is going to have a say in my evaluation before I take a chance of stepping on anyones toes.
     
  41. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jan 13, 2011

    The ST certainly did learn a valuable lesson: that even seasoned professionals can act unprofessional and immature. If the veteran teacher did not think the suggestion would work, he/she could have just explained that. Was there really a reason to get upset about it? I don't think it's fair to tell someone that just because he is a student teacher, a new teacher, or a seasoned teacher that his/her ideas are not valid...

    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." Aristotle
     
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