95% of students' problems can be avoided if.....

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Pi-R-Squared, Mar 6, 2019.

  1. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Groupie

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    1,337
    Likes Received:
    244

    Mar 6, 2019

    1.) They kept their hands to themselves.
    AND
    2.) Minded their own business....

    I told that to my 8th grade class today and a student asked, "Can that be proven?"

    So I ask everyone here..... Do y'all believe that's true or maybe a bit oversimplified?
     
  2.  
  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    13,828
    Likes Received:
    1,652

    Mar 7, 2019

    Anecdotal evidence only, but certainly true in my classroom this year.
     
  4. rpan

    rpan Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    637
    Likes Received:
    470

    Mar 7, 2019

    I’m more of a school of thought that problems can be avoided if students had better self regulation of their emotions and actions. I think I’m simplifying it even more!
     
  5. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    13,828
    Likes Received:
    1,652

    Mar 7, 2019

    I agree. There is a section on our report cards where we report on Learning Skills. Self-Regulation is often the one where students perform the weakest.
     
  6. Aces

    Aces Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2018
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    454

    Mar 7, 2019

    While I think there's definitely a relationship between doing those two things and having fewer problems, I'm not sure how easy it would be to prove that to a bunch of skeptical 8th graders, using data gathered from outside sources. You're a math teacher, right? Could you turn this into a learning activity where students track the number of incidents that were caused and avoided by doing or not doing those things? There's at least a couple months left in the school year, so you have enough time to gather enough data to actually show a correlation between the two. Once the data is compiled, you would have hard evidence to support your claim, and it would be a great learning experience for the students.
     
    vickilyn likes this.
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,935
    Likes Received:
    676

    Mar 7, 2019

    Did you say, "Well, we're going to do an experiment right here?"
     
    vickilyn likes this.
  8. Belch

    Belch Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2017
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    86

    Mar 10, 2019

    It seems to me that detecting and dealing with those problems isn't something a teacher would want to avoid.

    If only students refrained from physical violence and minded their own business...

    Sorry, but no. I would quit the job if I thought of it in those terms. I've got exactly 8 years until I can retire, and I do hope that I won't be thinking along those lines in 7 years. The 8th... yeah, I would have to just cruise through to my pension...

    Sucks to be you.
     
  9. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    1,617
    Likes Received:
    323

    Mar 10, 2019

    100% of student problems can be avoided if you don't become a teacher;)
     
    Baroness likes this.
  10. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,778
    Likes Received:
    154

    Mar 10, 2019

    True but...also, over simplified because it doesn't take into account that a lot of self regulating issues can stem from neurological conditions. Therefore, many of those kinds of behaviors typically stem from issues that likely need to be addressed and possibly treated. In sum, those behaviors are typically symptomatic of something deeper. I am speaking specifically of cases in which behaviors fall outside of what would typically be observed for that age and grade level. However, even if we are speaking of normal behaviors that do not indicate a neurological condition, it is somewhat unfair, in my opinion, to assume that our students actually know good strategies for self regulation. I am of the firm belief that just like academics, we have to explicitly teach this to students. That also includes time to practice and reflect on the strategies.
     
  11. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    9,458
    Likes Received:
    2,355

    Mar 10, 2019

    I'm going with grossly oversimplified. You may be talking about in your classroom, but many of those behaviors arise out of problems that start in the home. Just my opinion.
     
  12. skyline

    skyline Companion

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2014
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    27

    Mar 10, 2019

    I see it as behavioral manifestations of the over-simplified phenomena of self-regulationn. From my experiences in elementary classrooms, I've seen many problems arise from not keeping hands to self and not minding one's own business.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2019
  13. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Groupie

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    1,337
    Likes Received:
    244

    Mar 10, 2019

    I was quoting from my first ever P. He would mention it every once in a while during afternoon announcements
     
  14. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    9,458
    Likes Received:
    2,355

    Mar 10, 2019

    You have to understand that I work with an all SPED population, but before they got to me, they were in general ed. classrooms. I have the advantage of knowing about the trauma that they have lived through, possible drug use and exposure, the family dynamics, or whether or not they even reside with family, their weaknesses, their strengths, and what some of the factors that contribute to the behavior issues. It goes so much deeper than keeping their hands to themselves and minding their own business. These are students who may seem to understand those concepts, but they actually have no idea of how to internalize those directions to impact their actions. Before I was all SPED, I saw very similar students in a public school, who had the same issues with being able to internalize the why their actions failed. Now I have more information, but I still see those former students with more educated eyes, and know that I had some students there who could very well be my students today. Thus my belief that your first principle was taking a simplistic look at what is a complex set of issues.
     
  15. Guitart

    Guitart Companion

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2014
    Messages:
    118
    Likes Received:
    35

    Mar 10, 2019

    The very first school I was employed at heavily promoted Common Sense. Kids made posters and the P talked about it all the time.
    You cannot believe how refreshing that was to me. I mean I laughed and almost cried. I was fresh out of working at a bank, where we all joked in I.T. that the "Common Sense" motivational poster must still be rolled up in a tube inside the HR manager's office.
     
  16. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,299
    Likes Received:
    946

    Mar 11, 2019

    You're probably right in some ways. The problem also is most are not held accountable for said actions so it will never completely stop.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 402 (members: 0, guests: 385, robots: 17)
test