7th Grade LA Classroom Library

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Georgia"Teach", Jun 25, 2007.

  1. Georgia"Teach"

    Georgia"Teach" Rookie

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    Jun 25, 2007

    Hello All!
    I am a new 7th grade Language Arts teacher and am looking to stock a classroom library. I am big on reading (obviously!) so I want to have a few full shelves come August. I have the basics already (The Giver, The Outsiders, Stargirl, Max the Mighty, etc.) but am looking for a lot more! Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks!
     
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  3. aceighthgrade

    aceighthgrade Rookie

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    Jun 25, 2007

    Go to your local library. Sometimes, they may have book sales and you can pick up some good books for cheap prices. Also, yard sales have some good books also, as well as Goodwill and Salvation Army.

    Good luck!:angel:
     
  4. Georgia"Teach"

    Georgia"Teach" Rookie

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    Jun 25, 2007

    Thanks for the tips with garage sales.

    Anyone have any specific titles? That's what I am really looking for, especially boy books!
     
  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Jun 25, 2007

    I have over 300 books in my 7th grade library . . . and that's after I cleaned them out at the end of the year and got rid of a bunch. My boys like Gary Paulsen and Jim Kjelgaard, plus the series of unfortunate events books.

    My girls love Laurie Halse Anderson, Patricia McCormick, and Stephanie Meyer.
     
  6. Exclaimation Po

    Exclaimation Po Habitué

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    I want to caution you that your books have a strong chance of being thrashed by the end of the year. Set up very specific ground rules regarding your library. I didn't and my books are in terrible shape. The books were mostly donations, so I didn't lose any money.

    My suggestion is to go to your local big book store and talk to whomever is in charge of the young adult section. They can give you tons of suggestions!
     
  7. hapyeaster

    hapyeaster Rookie

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    Jun 25, 2007

    It really depends on your demographics. A lot of my boys read Walter Dean Myers, and I am a huge fan. Books like Slam, Scorpions, Hoops all deal with topics that young Afrrican American boys and some girls tend to find real.

    I teach 8th LA, but my kids are lower level. I did lots of read alouds...Tiger Rising, Homecoming, Slam, Touching Spirit Bear, Watsons Go to Birmingham, Bronx Masquerade. I also have books like Artemis Fowl and Harry Potter. I have a few "girlie" books, but not many.

    Some of the books in my library are more cutting edge and reach a more diverse cultural base. Angela Johnson, Nikki Grimes, of course anything Newbery is awesome in my opinion. I also like Corretta Scott King Award winners.

    Check out ebay...I ordered a huge lot of "buy it now" auctions, and am axiously awaiting. You might want to make sure you have lower level, mid level and upper level depending on your students. We do AR, so my books have to be certified through Renlearn as AR, which will be easier this year because we bought Renaissance Enterprise which gives us every AR test known to man!

    Have fun!
     
  8. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

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    Jun 26, 2007

    Talk to your librarians (city and school), too. They keep up with current literature and reading lists for young adults. Texas has something called the Lonestar Reading List. You probably have something similar in Georgia.
     
  9. holliday

    holliday Comrade

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    Jun 26, 2007

    I always read The Beasties, The Hobbit, Hoot, and Hatchet with my 7th graders. They love those books. For boys specifically, I've had good luck with the Eragon books and Heat. I can't recall the authors of those right off the top of my head.

    One way I've gotten a lot of free books is to pass out the Scholastic book order forms with my students and really encourage them to order. I team up with a neighboring teacher and we pool our points (they give the teacher so many points per book ordered) and we always wind up with a box of free books. Once the kids see that the classroom library grows as they purchase books, they tend to order more for themselves, too.

    I also write my name in permanent marker on the outside and inside. I keep a notebook on one of the shelves and have the kids sign out books. When they bring the book back, they leave it on my desk and I initial they brought it back next to their name in the notebook. Then I have a student aide or random student reshelve the book. It keeps them from disappearing quite so often. If a book is out for an inordinate amount of time, I remind the student. At the end of each marking period, I contact parents with a form email for all missing books. The parents then get on the kid's case and I sometimes have replacement books brought it.

    I also ask parents in my beginning of the year newsletter if they have any novels or research materials they'd like to donate. You'd be surprised how many free books you'll get this way! Oftentimes I hear that parents have old books they feel bad about throwing away but don't really want to hang onto anymore.
     
  10. LadyBard

    LadyBard Rookie

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    Jun 27, 2007

    Classroom Library

    I think it's great that you want to have books for your students to read as soon as the walk into your room and the titles you mentioned are great library mainstays. In my experience it's always been helpful to ask my students what they would like to see the classroom library. As the year goes on and they begin to go through the books you're starting with, start asking them what they would like to see in the classroom library. Ask each student to write down genres that they are interested in reading and
    you could even have them write down specific titles if they want.

    You don't want to hear "All those books are boring!"
    or "I read those books already", when you ask them
    to get a new independent reading book.

    Just my 2 cents worth.

    Also try to get a few volumes of poetry. Most kids don't like it. But if you have a few volumes on hand they might just pick one up.

    Good luck!!
     
  11. holliday

    holliday Comrade

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    Another thing that helps is to have students present book talks on books they have enjoyed. I try to keep these informal but model one each day for the 1st week of school so they see what kind of info makes an interesting book talk. They tend to put more stock into each other's opinions of what's good to read...and that encourages them to seek out those books. Plus, I ALWAYS have kids fighting over who gets to read the books I happen to present that 1st week (I try to then do at least a couple of random book talks myself throughout the year, as kids run out of ideas).
     
  12. katrinkit

    katrinkit Comrade

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    Jun 30, 2007

    "Boy Book" authors/series

    Walter Dean Myers
    SE Hinton
    Jerry Spinelli
    Cirque du Freak (can't remember author)
    Jeff Smith (Bone series - graphic novels)
    Anthony Horowitz (fantasy)
    Sharon Draper
    Matt Christopher (Sports)
    Paul Zindel
    Nancy Farmer
    Avi
    Mike Lupica (Sports)

    These are all I can think of right now. I do the book request sheets on one of my bulletin boards, and book talk them as soon as I can get my hands on them. I am looking for a new check-out system - I like the idea of having the kids turn them in to me to initial...I bought some small avery labels and labeled all of my books with two labels - one on the inside and one on the outside.
     
  13. msb

    msb Rookie

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    Jul 4, 2007

    It all depends on your kids. I had a checkout system for all of my books. It's basically a clipboard and a sign-out sheet for each period. I also have software that I downloaded that catalogs for 100 books, then you'll have to buy the software to include more books. I had a student write down the titles for all of my books, and they've been included in the catalog. I entered them in myself. I also initial on the list when they've returned the books.

    I also brought a self-inking stamp that I had made at Staples. It just says "From the Library of Teacher Name..." I stamped the inside of the book, and a specific page number, like 100. For books shorter than that I stamped page 50, and so on.

    Holliday mentioned scholastic book club, and I second that recommendation. I started my classroom library with their help. I was able to get a few free books from students' book orders. Boys also like sports-related stories, too. There were a few books that just had stats for different sports. I think it was the ESPN series. I don't recall the exact name.


    By the way, I also think if you have a book fair, posting your wish list would let parents know that you would like to have those books for your classroom.

    Anyway, I'll keep following this thread to get more ideas on classroom libraries. Thanks everyone!
     
  14. ayotte04

    ayotte04 Comrade

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    Jul 4, 2007

    Hatchet by Gary Paulsen, Dear Mr. Henshaw (Beverly Cleary)
     

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