7th Grade History Curriculum

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by willow0505, Jun 20, 2014.

  1. willow0505

    willow0505 Rookie

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    Jun 20, 2014

    Hi All,

    I am moving up to the middle school level after being in elementary for two years. I love middle school and taught it for a year when I was first hired. I was bumped down to elementary due to not having enough seniority. This upcoming year, I will be teaching 7th grade world history. I am extremely excited, but a bit nervous on how to approach the best way to teach the material. I was not very thrilled to find out we will be using the 2006 version of Glencoe's Discovering Our Past: Medieval and Modern History. When I taught 6th grade we used Glencoe as the curriculum and I wasn't the biggest fan of it. I felt like it was boring and there weren't enough activities that spiced it up. Does anyone currently teach 7th grade World History and use this curriculum? If so, how do you teach it?

    Thanks!!
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jun 20, 2014

    Does your state's curriculum match this textbook?
     
  4. geoteacher

    geoteacher Devotee

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    Jun 20, 2014

    Good point! The state standards should drive what you teach. Any textbook would just be one of the tools you use to get there. I teach social studies also, and I honestly find that the longer I teach, the less I use the textbook.
     
  5. willow0505

    willow0505 Rookie

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    What do you use to supplement if you don't use the text? Where do you get your information?
     
  6. geoteacher

    geoteacher Devotee

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    Many things - a current events magazine, things from National Geographic, stuff from NCSS and state social studies organizations, lesson plans that other people have shared online, primary source documents, Youtube and other videos, etc. Again, though, what to include all stems from the state standards and the district curriculum if there is one.
     
  7. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Jun 21, 2014

    I'm teaching US hist for the first time in nearly a decade this year. So far I've planned out the first 12 weeks and not a single day uses the textbook. There is just so much out there (and by out there I mean on the Internet...) that using a poorly written and lifeless text seems a huge disservice.

    For my world history classes I use the book a bit (usually once per unit for unit previews) but I use Holt's Early to Medieval. You can see my curriculum at www.mrroughton.com. I'm also in California so it should match the expectations of your school pretty closely.
     
  8. willow0505

    willow0505 Rookie

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    Jun 22, 2014

    Rockguykev

    Mr. Roughton I feel honored to have you responded to my post!! I found your website a few weeks ago while researching the best ways to teach middle school history and I absolutely love what you do! You have amazing resources that I hope to incorporate in my class, but I have a question about logistics. How do you incorporate your learning activities like the History Mystery Labs? Are these activities you have done after lecturing about the materials? Are there better ways than lecturing? I taught elementary last year and loved incorporating technology in my class. I flipped my math class, but I'm a bit unsure what is the best way to do that with world history. Any suggestions? Thank you in advance for any suggestions:)
     
  9. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Jun 22, 2014

    Glad you found it! It depends on the mystery actually. Most of them have some type of introduction before hand (usually via lecture which, when done well, is a perfectly valid instructional method) but not all. With Caesar there's almost no introduction as it starts my Rome unit. With the Medicis there is a brief (1 slide) portion of the intro to Renaissance notes before hand that basically just tells the kids who Lorenzo was. Most of my lessons are modular in that they are one day and not really based on order. I hate doing the same things 4 times in a day so I'll often split them throughout the week with 1 period doing lecture - lab and other another doing lab - lecture.
     
  10. blauren

    blauren Rookie

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    Aug 12, 2014

    My favorite social studies curriculum is History Alive! You can look up the website for it and they offer free 30 day trials. You can get a lot of great, interactive lessons to use that your students will love. The best lessons I've taught have come from this curriculum.
     

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