5th grade reading level books with no subplots

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by WaterfallLady, Jan 25, 2010.

  1. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Jan 25, 2010

    I have an interesting but difficult reading class. I teach a special ed. reading class. The kids are low functioning in intellect, but most of them can read up to the high fifth grade level at the instructional level.

    Comprehension is so difficult for them. I cannot find a reading curriculum for kids with lower IQs who are fluent readers. There are programs to teach them sight words, but they are far beyond that.

    We are working majorly on comprehension. Most of them are still at the literal level, but I've seen an inference or two. They are all high schoolers, but socially-emotionally they are closer to intermediate kids. They love their dog books, but they also love books with history in them or themes of being different.

    Because I can't find a comprehension program, I am looking for novels that only have one plot going on at a time without a whole lot of changes. They don't have the memory to handle subplots, and its not something I can address until they master some more important comprehension skills. For example, Hoot has been difficult, and Maniac Magee is hard because of the constant setting change.

    Does anyone have any ideas? My principal suggested George Washington's Socks but it seems youngish.
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jan 25, 2010

    Oh, I would imagine those two selections are difficult for them. What about survival type books - the Everest series by Korman, or his Island series (which does include some middle-school age social relationships) or even Gary Paulsen books like Hatchet. Check on Spark notes for chapter by chapter summaries to see which of his books might be simplest in plot. There will be one main goal in these books, which might be helpful.


    http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/hatchet/summary.html
     
  4. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Those survival books don't really work well for them- they have no personal experience to compare it to, so comprehension is difficult. They loved Freak the Mighty because they could all relate.
     
  5. round stanley

    round stanley Companion

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    Jan 25, 2010

    My favorite way to search for books is bookwizard.scholastic.com. You put in a topic of interest to your students then search for that topic. After that you break it down by reading level/interest level (lexile, grade level, DRA, guided reading). Save the list and you are done, except for getting the books.
     
  6. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Well, there is a sequal to Freak the Mighty.
     
  7. hoku625

    hoku625 Rookie

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    Jan 31, 2010

    My students are reading George Washington's Socks and they seem to like it. It is relatively easy but it helps with comprehension.

    I just finished reading Loser by Jerry Spinelli and this might work for your group as well. It's a pretty basic plot and maybe have a personal connection.
     

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