5th Grade Read-Aloud Books

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by kburen, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. kburen

    kburen Cohort

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    Hey everyone. Just wondering if anyone has any suggestions on good books that I can use as read alouds with my 5th graders. The school asks that we do at least 10 minutes of read alouds a day and I love this. I want to choose books that all of my kids will enjoy, both boys and girls. I'm thinking about "The Giver" but I'm wondering if it could be too above them even if I'm the one reading it? I'm not sure....I just know we read it in my Kiddy-Lit class and we all loved it. Anyway...Thanks in advance for suggestions! :)
     
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  3. Andrea L

    Andrea L Habitué

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    What about the book Hoot. I know that the fifth grade teachers in my building like to read this one. Island of the Blue dolphins is also a great one to read aloud. I read it to my fourth graders last year and they liked it, but it was a little over their heads. A few years ago I read A Wrinkle in Timeto another fourth grade class and it too was a little over their heads, but I think it would be great for fifth grade. Check out books by Andrew Clements. The kids also love his books as well.
     
  4. Sarah Leigh Ann

    Sarah Leigh Ann Companion

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    How about Tuck Everlasting or Maniac McGee? I remember my teacher reading these and I loved them. I know a sixth grade teacher that reads The Outsiders and Number the Stars- depending on where you are there are a lot of World War II exhibits going up at local colleges here
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Yes to Tuck Everlasting, Maniac McGee, Number the Stars. I read The Giver aloud last year but I didn't enjoy it so I don't plan to do so again. The kids liked it, though. I wouldn't do the Outsiders and I kind of thought that A Wrinkle in Time is too juvenile but maybe not. Also, Frindle, Rascal, My Side of the Mountain, Shiloh, Sounder.
     
  6. camcdade

    camcdade Comrade

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    I was going to suggest Frindle and Maniac McGee, too. Those are two of my favorites for older kids. When I taught 5th my kids always love the Wayside School series by Louis Sachar. Good for a laugh and quick little chapters. They also loved the Poppy series by Avi. There's Poppy, Poppy and Rye, Ereth's Birthday and more that I can't remember right now. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Where the Red Fern Grows, and The Doll People were also hits with my students.
     
  7. teacherchick

    teacherchick Companion

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    I used the Joey Pigza series.. joey Pigza swallowed a key being the first book in it. There are some parts you may want to edit but nothing bad tht you could not say. It is about a boy with ADHD and it is VERY realistc. Kids really relate to it.
     
  8. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I was uncomfortable reading one of the Joey P books. Wayside School also. I disliked The Egypt Game, but for different reasons. How is The Westing Game? There is a new Alice Hoffman book for children that I want to try, forget the name. She is an excellent writer. Is Island of the Blue Dolphins difficult as a read-aloud because of the names? I read Lily's Crossing aloud every year. I don't know what to choose next ..... so many books ...
     
  9. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Upsadaisy, what made you uncomfortable about the Wayside school books? I read the first two to my kids last year and liked how the chapters were so small, I had definite stopping points. I was just curious about if it was one of them in paticular or the series that you didn't like.
    I read the Westing Game years ago, I can vaugly remember it, but I liked it. I think I'm going to read The Mixed-up Files of Mrs........ (not even going to try spelling that name! :D) If you think of the Alice Hoffman book, let me know! :)
     
  10. kburen

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    I have all the Joey Pigza books in my classroom library. I also thought about Frindle and got one of the books by the same author . The problem is that they read some of these in their reading books. Maniac McGee was one of my favorites before and I considered it but wasn't sure. Maybe I'll use it :) I have a few that I'm putting together and going to let my kids vote on what we read first. Thanks everyone :)
     
  11. Sarah Leigh Ann

    Sarah Leigh Ann Companion

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    I read The Westing Game when I was fourth and did not truly understand it until sixth grade when the teacher read it to us
     
  12. cingy

    cingy Rookie

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    I love reading The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle ( a female heroine) as well as Maniac Magee...both lead to great discussions. I have also read Love, Ruby Lavendar, A Wrinkle in Time. Do not forget to read non-fiction... kids love anything to do with Shackleton's adventures in Antarctica. My son advises reading The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles (spelling) by Julie Edwards (also known as Julie Andrews of Sound of Music fame). Oh there are many more. I like to choose books that might not be accessible for some of the kids but provide a platform for serious discussion.
     
  13. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    I have already finished reading Frindle to my class & they loved it. We started Hatchet last week. I wanted to read Bud, Not Buddy- but they outvoted me. Next we are reading The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.
     
  14. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I wondered if the Whangdoodles was a good one. I have a couple of copies. Wayside School - I didn't like how the kids treated each other, and were disrespectful, even in fun. Our environment is sooooo positive and respectful that some of the funny parts of the book just fell flat. Same for Joey Pigza. I read JP Loses Control and I felt the adult characters were so irresponsible that it was hard to read. I also didn't like the casual treatment of medication. I always read Dear Levi - Letters from the Overland Trail when we study westward expansion. It really hits home with the kids how ruthless the trip west was and how Native Americans were mistreated.

    What do you think of Walk Two Moons? We are reading it now.
     
  15. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I love Dear Levi. I can see your point in Wayside School. Walk Two Moons is also wonderful. This will be the first year I haven't read My Palace of Leaves since I have many of my same kids. It is a wonderful book though, especially in light of all the problems the world is facing. I read Bridge to Terribethea last year, but the kids never really got into it. I also take time, especially in the evenings as they start to leave a few at a time for the busses to read some fun stuff (Shel Silverstein, etc).
     
  16. kburen

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    They read Walk Two Moons in one of the 5th grade classes that I worked with. It was hard for them because of the talk of death in it. That year many of the kids lost a friend in a car accident and the students were still dealing with it. The teacher kind of edited it as she read it to them to try and take out most of the parts that would hit too hard home for them. I do have it though and may try it with my kids :) I loved it!
     
  17. loves2teach

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    I started reading Walk Two Moons to my class last year and they were so not into it. I ended up not even finishing it, and I told the few that were into it that they could check it out from my library & read it.
     
  18. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I hate when that happens. It happened with Wayside School. I assigned Walk Two Moons, though, it is not a read-aloud.
     
  19. MrHansen

    MrHansen New Member

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    I gave my kids the opportunity to choose from a short list (5 or 6 titles) of books that were on average two the three grade levels higher in DRP rating (according to TASA's Booklink, et al). After ruling out books such as When Zachary Beaver Came to Town and Walk Two Moons (two of my kids had read it already for the summer), we narrowed it down to The Hobbit and Bud, Not Buddy. Surprisingly enough, despite the momentum that Tolkien's material has right now, Bud, Not Buddy won out, perhaps because the implied suspense that the book's jacket-flap synopsis provided, coupled with the theme of searching for a lost parent really piqued their interest. We're two chapters in as we enter week two of the school year, and they're loving it.

    Incidentally, we'll back-burner The Hobbit and read that next, just in time to do a writer's strategy focus on the importance of elaboration and detail. Who better than Tolkien for modeling that? =)
     
  20. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Hi, MrHansen, and welcome to atoz. I think all the detail in Tolkien is a bit much for me. I could never get into him when I was young. I'm going to leave Bud, Not Buddy for later in the year and probably go with something a bit less complex next. I have such a small class this year that I chose to assign a book for all to read, though I really don't like to do that.

    It's great to have a male 5th grade teacher at atoz!
     
  21. SimplySue

    SimplySue Rookie

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    Christy F. - I read The Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankwheiler (sp) every year. It is an old Newberry winner but it is still great. We discuss how prices have changed since that book was written and how things have changed with regards to "running away". I found a wonderful book last year that deals with special needs and the feelings of resource students. It's called Sahara Special. I also like Loser. Lots of the books already mentioned are wonderful. Perhaps you can encourage a kid pick also. This could be a book chosen by a student reviewer who has read that book. Have them write reasons why they would want to hear it again read by you. Enjoy. I love reading to my students.
     
  22. Ms.D

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    One of my favorites that is always a hit with the 5th grade is Shiloh. Once that is finished, the kids always want more, so I can then read the other two. Another great book by Reynolds-Naylor is The Grand Escape - about 2 cats who escape their home and have quite the adventure.
    If you want something with a values type slant, I have found Surviving Brick Johnson by Laurie Myers to be one students can take. It is fairly short, and chapters can be read quickly. It deals with bullying and making assumptions about others, but the main theme is respect. A good book to start the year with.
     
  23. NewToFifthGrade

    NewToFifthGrade Rookie

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    I am thinking of reading Hoot or Surviving the Applewhites?
     
  24. NSFoster

    NSFoster New Member

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    I am about to finish the "Tale of Despereaux" and the kids are loving it! We also finished the first the Wayside School books which they also enjoyed. Our school has invested in the Dear America series which correlates to what we are learning in social studies.
     
  25. Veteran Teacher

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    I love Ruby Holler by Sharon Creech. Some other good books are A Long Way from Chicago and A Year Down Below. Both are by the same author, but I can't remember the name right now. Holes by Lois Sacchar is another good one. It's good as a read aloud because it can be kind of confusing since it goes between the past and the present.
     
  26. TeacherRW

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    re: 5th grade Read Alouds

    I tend to pull out the "oldies but goodies" for my read alouds. I know that there is some good literature just sitting on our library's shelf that doesn't get looked at because the covers aren't flashy like some of the newer books. We do read a book called The Year My Parents Ruined My Life right away. Then I move into some of my childhood favorites...The Black Stallion or Black Beauty, Where the Red Fern Grows, Old Yeller, The Boxcar Children (series), etc. I read a couple of the books that are up for the "Flickertail Award" in our state. In addition to the chapter books, I tend to read several picture books to my students. I tie them into the curriculum whenever I can.

    ~*Robin*~
     
  27. Aplusteacher

    Aplusteacher Rookie

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    I am currently reading Because of Winn Dixie to my class and I thought I would read something like Maniac McGee next. The kids are loving Winn Dixie!
     
  28. kburen

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    I decided on 3 that I have in my classroom right now. I'm going to let the students vote and decide which they want to read. I'll let you know what they pick! Choices are: Walk Two Moons, There's a Boy in the Girls Bathroom, and Bud, Not Buddy.

    Maniac McGee will make it in the next set that I give them to choose from *I got a lot of 100 books off ebay and that's in it* :)
     
  29. kburen

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    They chose There's a Boy in the Girls Bathroom
     
  30. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    VeteranTeacher - I think that author is Peck. I started reading aloud Maniac Magee today. I like it as a read-aloud because I can make sure they don't miss some of the important details. I had two discussion groups today for Walk Two Moons. One was really into it, focused on significant stuff, knew what they were talking about. The other group spent too much time deciding where to sit and then had absolutely nothing to say. Nothing. I couldn't believe it. I sent them to study hall instead of recess and had them reread the last three chapters. Grrrrr....
     

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