5th grade math and science

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by latybug, Jul 10, 2007.

  1. latybug

    latybug Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2007

    I have taught for 18 years but am now changing grade levels, schools, and districts. I have never taught just two subjects before. I have always been self contained. (all subjects) I will now be teaching math and science three times each a day. The students rotate through the teachers. I had been teaching 4th. Does any one have any helpful hints or ideas? Is there anyone out there who just teaches 5th grade math and science who would like to chat with me so I know I'm on the right track. Thanks for any help you are willing to offer.
    Oklahoma Teacher:eek:
     
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  3. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 10, 2007

    Well, I love math and science, especially 4th-5th grade. Yet what kind of advice are you seeking? Are you seeking different kinds of lessons for the fifth graders, or are you pretty much settled in that area?

    One Math and Science staple is http://aimsedu.org. It's one of my favorite companies (and I'm sure you know of it, since you've been in the classroom a very long time) because it is hands-on and students especially at this age enjoy the experimentation.
     
  4. latybug

    latybug Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2007

    I haven't visited that site or store. My old school made us order from certain stores so this is helpful. I guess what I am looking for is assurance that 5th graders aren't that much different than 4th graders and that the material isn't that much harder to teach. I hate change but wanted to get closer to home.

    Any successful lessons would be helpful. The math and science books are book Hartcourt series. The scariest thought for me is our state gives a test in every subject for 5th grade. The school I am going to has high scores. The principal I will be working for was my sixth grade teacher. I just want to make sure that my students and I live up to what is expected.

    Thanks for your help.:love:
     
  5. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 10, 2007

    Haha... it's kind of like how our assistant principal was a sixth grade Language Arts teacher when I was in sixth grade. Though she wasn't my teacher, we can still talk people and carry on a conversation about the time I was in middle school.

    Fifth graders aren't much different from fourth graders. They come in knowing what we taught them! So... you'll generally have a good idea of what they already know. Perhaps talk to the other teachers at the school and see what they are planning on doing this year.

    The eye-opener for me was the science fair last year. I had a boy who won for the entire county. I think I cried for an hour because I never knew I could guide kids to do that well. I got all that insight by speaking with our Math and Science Lab teacher and going online to many great science fair websites.

    Here's some of my lesson plans for next year- not really ordered that great... yet :)-

    Science

    Test Prep
    -Design an Experiment

    Unit: Cells
    -Comprehension Sheet: Cells (see Human Body unit folder)
    -Creative Assessment: Building a Cell (Jell-o, a bowl, kiwi, and various candies)

    Unit: Our Environment, Animals, and Conservation
    Extreme Adaptations:
    -Balloon, Yeast Activity
    -COMPREHENSION: Beastly Bugs or Cool Critters? (Scholastic’s Non-Fiction Passages with Graphic Organizers for Independent Practice) p. 58-61 (SKILL: CLASSIFICATION, MAIN IDEA/SUPPORTING DETAILS)
    -COMPREHENSION: Change of Heart (Scholastic’s Non-Fiction Passages with Graphic Organizers for Independent Practice) p. 71-74 (SKILL: COMPARING AND CONTRASTING)
    -COMPREHENSION: Nature’s Neat Noses (Scholastic’s Non-Fiction Passages with Graphic Organizers for Independent Practice) p. 75-78 (SKILL: CLASSIFICATION)
    -COMPREHENSION: Mister Mom (Scholastic’s Non-Fiction Passages with Graphic Organizers for Independent Practice) p. 96-99 (SKILL: CLASSIFICATION)


    Life:
    -Comprehension Sheet: Teaching Students to Read Nonfiction (Scholastic)- Return of the Wolves (pages 43-44 and 49)

    Springs Coast Environmental Center
    Literature: Everglades by Jean Craighead George/Wendell Minor

    Two-Day Unit: Spooky Science!
    -Hands-On: Pumpkinology (Measuring, weighing pumpkins)
    -Experiment: Steve Spangler: Screaming Balloon (http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment/00000080) What would Halloween be without spooky sounds? Here's an easy-to-do experiment using only a balloon and a hex nut from the hardware store. Be sure to buy enough supplies for all of your Halloween party guests because everyone is going to want a screaming balloon!
    -Oobleck
    (http://www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/ooze.html)
    -Experiment: Steve Spangler: Light Sticks, Liquid Light
    (http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment/light-sticks-the-science-of-liquid-light) Just give the plastic light stick a little "snap" and a shake and the liquid inside begins to glow. Some people call it liquid light. Our experience tells us that with light comes heat... but not this time. Light sticks are more popular than ever and have become almost required apparel for Halloween to cast an eerie glow on the candy seekers. Light sticks are also a great and inexpensive teaching tool for students to learn how temperature affects the rate of the chemical reaction.
    (VIDEO: http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/content/science-video/liquid-light)

    Unit: “A Journey Through Me” (Human Body)

    • Systems
    -Comprehension: System Description Match-Up (Folder- Skeletal Survey)

    • Skeletal System
    -Comprehension: Skeletal System (Questionnaire paper with questions) (Folder)

    • Circulatory System
    -Comprehension: Heart Thumping Workouts (Folder) SKILL: PROBLEM AND SOLUTION
    -Experiment: Hand vs. Heart (Folder)

    • Nutrition
    -Nutrition Explorations (Arianna’s Nutrition Expedition) (some copies saved to MY DOCUMENTS)
    (http://www.nutritionexplorations.org/educators/lessons/arianna/arianna-rnav-download.asp)
    -Print Your Own Nutrition Tracker
    (http://www.nutritionexplorations.org/pdf/kids/nutritiontracker.pdf)
    -Computer Game: Be a Breakfast Detective!
    (http://www.nutritionexplorations.org/kids/activities/detective.asp)
    -Computer Games: Arianna’s Nutrition Expedition
    (http://www.nutritionexplorations.org/kids/activities/arianna.asp)

    Unit: Rock On! (Geology)
    -COMPREHENSION: Landslide Disaster! (Scholastic’s Non-Fiction Passages with Graphic Organizers for Independent Practice) p. 87-91 (SKILL: CAUSE AND EFFECT)
    -COMPREHENSION: Drip, Drop, Drip! The Water Cycle (Scholastic’s Non-Fiction Passages with Graphic Organizers for Independent Practice) p. 109-112 (SKILL: CYCLE DIAGRAMS)

    -Experiment: Make Your Own Topographical Map and Mountain (http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/srtm_makemap.shtml) A topographic map, or "topo map," is a way to show mountains and valleys on a flat piece of paper. Topo maps are handy and necessary for many uses, including building roads and hiking trails in the mountains. The map shows where the hills and valleys are and how steep they are. Students, in groups, will make their own mountain and topographical maps. Other groups will see how the maps match up to the mountains.
    -Interactive Website: Volcano Explorer: Build Your Own Volcano
    (http://kids.discovery.com/games/pompeii/pompeii.html)
    Worksheet:
    -What are the three types of volcanoes?
    -What type of volcano results when you have low viscosity and high gas?
    -What type of volcano results when you have low viscosity and low gas?
    -What type of volcano results when you have high viscosity and low gas?
    -What type of volcano results when you have high viscosity and high gas?

    -Experiment: Core Samples of the Earth (http://www.redmond.k12.or.us/mccall/renz/2004-2005/coresamples.htm) Our student "miners" drilled through the "Earth" in order to take a core sample to discover what it looked like. After taking a sample and predicting, the black paper was removed from the cup to reveal the layers of the "Earth." Can you match the core sample with the "Earth" it was taken from?

    Unit: Force and Motion
    -Experiment: Build a Newtonian (Momentum) Physics Machine (http://spaceplace.nasa.gov//en/kids/funphysics.shtml) If you build it carefully, this crazy contraption demonstrates one of the basic laws of nature. This law explains many events we see every day. For example, why does a big truck come out the winner in a head-on crash with a small car, even if both are going the same speed upon impact?
    -Experiment/Demonstration: The Great Annual Rocket Launch with Mr. Jasztal
    -Experiment: Squeeze Bottle Rocket with Two Straws (http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/content/experiment/00000059)
    -Experiments: “Playground Physics” (in a folder)
    -Jungle Gym Drop (Day #2)
    -Swing Set Physics (Day #4)
    -Egg Drop Experiment (Building, takes about 2-3 days)
    -Make a Juice Bottle Float
    Need: juice bottles (small), cardboard, Styrofoam, rubber bands, etc. as well as a long narrow tub filled with water)
    (http://www.tinkeringschool.com/blog/?p=55)

    -Experiment: Constructing a Roller Coaster
    Tell students they will be designing and constructing wire roller coasters with hex nuts. The hex nut in each design must start from the top of the first hill, roll up and down the other two hills, and exit the end of the track. Each roller coaster will be judged in a class competition. The track with the greatest total of vertical heights for all three hills—if the tennis ball completes the course—will be named the winning design.
    (http://www.lessonplanspage.com/ScienceExCanIMakeARollerCoasterMO68.htm)
    Or this link: (http://www.raytown.k12.mo.us/news/olympiad.htm)
    The first challenge was to build a roller coaster using a chair, 15 feet of pipe insulation, masking tape, a marble, a few dominoes, a toilet paper roll and a few other items. Their objective was to build a roller coaster that would carry the marble to the end of the track where it would knock over three dominoes.
    Or last to read about the science of it and see more photos of kids making coasters: (http://www.coe.ufl.edu/Faculty/JonesG/articleCoasters.htm)
    -Building a Roller Coaster Online
    (http://www.sci-quest.org/home/just_for_kids/coaster.phtml)
    (http://kids.discovery.com/games/rollercoasters/buildacoaster.html)

    -Roller Coaster Physics Video (http://teacherstore.discovery.com/s...tId=55066&partnumber=775601&jzid=40588027-0-0)

    Unit: Sound and Light
    -Experiment: Build a Super Sound Cone (http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/tmodact.shtml) Pick out tiny sounds your ears alone can't hear. Make a simple sound cone to turn up the volume on whatever sounds are coming from a particular direction.

    Unit: Amazing Space!
    -Website: Cosmic Connections (http://ology.amnh.org/astronomy/cosmic/index.htm) Michael Shara from the Museum of Natural History works with pictures from the Hubble Space Telescope that orbits our planet. The Hubble gives incredible views of the universe because Earth’s atmosphere doesn’t interfere. This game has descriptions that match to pictures.

    Mini-Metric Olympics and Banana-Rama
    1. Banana-Rama (Outdoors)
    2. Mini-Metric Olympics (http://uark.edu/~k12info/teacher/workshops/AIMS-lessons/mini-metrics.pdf)
    3. Oreos (Book Buddies) (http://www.technospudprojects.com/Projects/Oreo/oreo2002_instructions.htm)
    1. Oreo stacking project

    2. How Much Is Cookie and How Much is Creme?
    Materials:
    • 1 bag of Oreo Cookies (if you wish to extend this project -- Is Double Stuf really Double Stuf? -- buy a bag of Double Stuf cookies also.)
    • 2 equal size bowls
    1. Twist open each Oreo cookie
    2. Carefully scrape ALL the creme from the inside of the cookie and place in a one bowl. Put the cookies into the other bowl.
    3. When you are done, measure each bowl. How much creme did you have? How much cookie?
    4. The measure the height of the cremeless cookies and put the creme into a measuring cup. How high were the cookies? How many cups of creme did you have?
    Compare this to double stuf. You will need the same amount of cookies - so be prepared to buy an extra bag. Scrape off the creme and then compare your double stuf measurement to your regular cookie creme. Is there really twice as much? Hmmm -- let me know!

    3. The Oreo Cookie Counting Book (Book Buddies)
    Bring in Oreo cookies to accompany the book. Write the following questions on chart paper and record the children's responses:
    • How many Oreos are in a package?
    • Are there enough cookies in a package for all of the children? Now ask them to count the cookies inside the package.
    • How many cookies will be left or how many more cookies will they need? Provide everyone with two cookies and a napkin.
    • Now how many Oreo halves do you each have? Ask everyone to twist open his or her cookies.
    • How many halves do they have in all? Invite the children to eat one whole cookie.
    • How many halves are left?
    • How many whole cookies are left?
    One-Week Unit: Summer Science
    DON’T BLINK AND MISS!
    1. Observing Nature: Microscope Pictures:
    (http://home.att.net/~teaching/science/micropix.pdf)
    2. Camera Obscura
    (http://www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/pringles_pinhole.html)
    3. Optical Illusions
    -Radial (http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/o/images/optclillusn_circeye_lg.jpg)
    -Gridded (go down to grid) (http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/Gm.html#anchor1020682)
    -Turning Cylinders
    (http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/o/images/optclillusn_cylind.jpg)
    -Rotary Motion
    (http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/o/images/optclillusn_rotor.jpg)
    -Push and Pull Troughs
    (http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/o/images/optclillusn_diag.jpg)
    -Spirals
    (http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/~akitaoka/uzu-e.html)
    -TRY DRAWING AN OPTICAL ILLUSION!
    4. Arrows Optical Illusion
    (http://pbskids.org/zoom/activities/sci/arrowsopticalillusio.html)

    WATER
    5. Experiment: Water on a String
    (http://pbskids.org/zoom/printables/activities/pdfs/wateronastring.pdf)
    6. The Amazing Water Trick
    (http://www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/watertrick.html)
    7. Soda Bottle Boat
    (http://pbskids.org/zoom/activities/sci/sodabottleboat.html)
    8. Water Density
    (http://pbskids.org/zoom/activities/sci/waterdensity.html)

    SODA
    9. Experiment: Mentos/Diet Coke Eruption
    (Video- http://www.stevespangler.com/archives/2007/06/06/mentos-slow-motion-video/)
    BUBBLES AND BALLOONS
    10. Bubbularium
    (http://www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/bub_dome.html)
    11. Blow up Balloons
    (http://www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/balloon_blowup.html)
    12. Balloon and Straw
    (http://pbskids.org/zoom/activities/sci/balloonandstraw.html)

    CRYSTALS AND ICE CREAM
    13. Grow Spikes of Crystals under the Sun
    (http://www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/crystal.html)
    14. Ice Cream in a Bag
    (http://home.att.net/~teaching/science/icecream.pdf)
     
  6. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 10, 2007

    Oh, and I also have the kids keep journals. I am keeping a form to have the students mark off for when I cover a specific topic. They'll have about 20 entries before general grading. They can also use notebook notes on tests, but not any textbooks. This teaches them to write descriptive notes. :)
     
  7. Jame

    Jame Comrade

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    Jul 10, 2007

    Hi, Latybug! How neat to be departmentalized!! I am taking an on-line class this summer on Thinkfinity (formally known as Marco Polo). The Illuminations sponsor site has amazing math lessons. You just search in your grade span and you can even type in what skill you are looking at.

    Thinkfinity Main Page:
    http://www.marcopolo-education.org/home.aspx

    Illuminations:
    http://illuminations.nctm.org/

    We haven't gotten to the science sponsor, yet, but I bet it is equally great. :) The ArtsEdge site lessons all integrate the arts with core content and wonderful.

    This is a really cool site that I found on Thinkfinity, but not sure which sponsor I found it on.
    http://education.jlab.org/indexpages/teachers.php

    Hope these help!! Have fun in 5th grade!!! :)
     
  8. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 10, 2007

    Verizon has an education website?? Hmmm. That's new for me, too.
     
  9. Jame

    Jame Comrade

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    Jul 10, 2007

    We've only begun to explore all the sites..we do two each week, discuss what we find, and write a reflection paper...but I have been VERY impressed with what I have found so far! I believe all the sponsor site lessons are matched to national standards, and some have a feature where you click on your state to pull up its standards. On the EconEdLink site, after you pulled up your state standards, it would list lessons that met each of those standards. :cool:

    Here is another great site that many of you are aware of I am sure:
    http://www.internet4classrooms.com/skills_5th.htm

    Latybug, PBS has an amazing education section with lots of math and science activities, too. :)
     
  10. novalyne

    novalyne Rookie

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    Jul 11, 2007

    I only teach science, not math. I will second Mrs. Jaztal's suggestion for having kids use science notebooks. There is a great book called "Science Notebooks: Writing About Inquiry" that gives really useful information about inquiry-based learning in science, plus how to set up an effective notebook. They really help with higher-order thinking skills, IMO.

    We get tested in science in Texas, too, and it's very stressful (75 is the passing score, possibly moving up to 80 this year, statewide scores are not very high and I'm in a low-income school). One of the things our district is really working on is the balance between hands-on and textbook learning. Hands-on activities are essential to introducing and understanding concepts...but if they can't read and understand highly academic science text, they still will not be successful.

    Does your school use FOSS or other kits? They are a great start and usually have both hands-on activities and reading material for each unit. I start with those, and for other units, I just try to make sure that I balance hands-on learning with getting into the textbook and really breaking it down. It's a works in progress!

    Here is what we cover in fifth grade, if it's similar to your curriculum feel free to let me know and I'd be happy to share some of the activities that we do. (But honestly, with your 18 years of experience, you could probably teach circles around me!)

    -Scienctific Method and Variables mini-unit - we usually do a pendulum experiment at the beginning of the year, as well as practicing observations, technical drawing, and setting up simple charts/graphs.
    -Matter (properties of matter including conducting/insulating, magnetism, buoyancy, density), Mixtures/Solutions, and Physical/Chemical changes
    -Energy (solar/light/heat, sound, electricity, and mechanical. I also teach force/motion and simple machines as part of this unit)
    -Earth science (rock cycle, water cycle, landforms including canyons, deltas, and caves, plus erosion/weathering/deposition. Also plate tectonics and earthquakes/tsunamis/volcanos)
    -Space science (sun's energy, order of planets, comparison of Earth to Moon)
    -Weather mini-unit
    -Plants mini-unit
    -Classification of plants and animals mini-unit
    -Ecosystems - adaptations, inherited and learned traits, food chains and webs, life cycles, plus changes that upset the balance, such as introduction of non-native species, pollution, overhunting, etc.) My favorite unit!
    -Cells (this is 6th grade for our district, but we teach it as enrichment in May after the science test)
    -Scientists - also after the science test, we usually do a unit on famous scientists.
     
  11. latybug

    latybug Rookie

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    Jul 11, 2007

    Thanks! Our curriculum sounds the same from what I have looked over in the teachers guide. Funny you should mention the textbook about notebooking. I think that was the same book I used in a workshop I went to last summer. I had my fourth graders last year make science notebooks for the first time. They really enjoyed them and learned a great deal.
    Science is my weak area so any help I could get from you would be great. When I taught 1st and 2nd grade we didn't do much science because admin told us not to. So I have really only been teaching science on a daily basis for the past 6 years. Last year was the first time I really enjoyed it. The workshop taught me how to balance bookwork/research and hands-on/experiments. My biggest problem is that I don't always know how to explain the material in a simple manner. I will also be teaching at a low-income school. The hardest thing to explain is dependant and independant variables. Mainly because I never really understood the difference myself. I know that will be a big part of our 5th grade curriculum. Thanks for you help. Please feel free when you have time to email me and share some of the lessons. I'll also share with you what I have. I have an awesome erosion experiment and planet spacing experiment. I can also send some pictures to help explain it. The test score at my new school last year in science were in the low 90's so the pressure is on.

    Thanks to all of you for your help. The websites that Ms. Jasztal and Jame put on are great. With help from you all things won't be so hard. :) :thanks:
     
  12. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Jul 11, 2007

    I'm also only going to teach 5th grade math and science next year! Get with the other teachers on your grade level as soon as you can so you can set up clear expectations, routines, and procedures as a grade level--that will help the kids. Currently, my partner teacher (who will teach all things language arts), has yet to be hired, so it's hard to decide all those things on my own :)
     
  13. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jul 11, 2007

    Idon't know anything about science but I have taught almost every year of math from 3rd to 9th grade math.

    5th grade math is a big jump up from 4th. That doesn't mean it is harder to teach. It is a lot more interesting. My goal is to have the students proficient in all operations with fractions and mixed numbers and decimals.

    What helped me this past year was to do calendar math every morning so that we had constant review of prior topics, terminology, skills. We naturally related fractions, decimals, and percents in a way that a chapter in a workbook simply doesn't do.

    I suggest morning work that includes long division (use expanded form with the dividend to show clearly what they are really doing) as well as fractions. Don't wait until a unit on fractions comes up in your text. I start off introducing equivalent fractions as patterns before I even mention the words equivalent fractions.

    5th graders seem shocked when they realize that you actually expect them to have remembered terminology and definitions from prior years' geometry lessons. Hello, it's time to be accountable.

    It is important to get them ready for middle school math to the best of their abilities.
     
  14. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 12, 2007

    The main focus in math at the beginning of the year in 4th grade is multiplication and eventually division because it is required in almost everything- numeric operations as well as area, perimeter (in using the 2L+ 2W formula), fractions (reductions, multiplication, and division of fractions), and well... so much more. Make sure your fifth graders are proficient in these areas or if they're not, they're working towards proficiency at home or during some free times in class. I teach remedial math, so it's grout work for me. Eventually, my math students learn quite a few of the facts, but it's a painstaking journey for some.

    In departmentalizing, you'll have some kids in that arena, and then you'll have your snap-your-fingers (woot! woot!) Einstein-os (insert: I can multiply 346 x 17 in my head), so it'll probably be interesting for you to accomodate both. Yet coming from 4th, I'm sure you've been in my shoes and know everything I've been talking about.

    Besides that, thank you for the private message! I'll try to help out more. You never know, I may develop a skills list for science, math, and (social studies). For all the skills I have to cover in each class this year, I'll have my extension lessons listed. Sometimes math has mini-lessons and groups because I have to accomodate AIP needs. Science and social studies, though, are where I don't do any mini-lessons or groups.
     
  15. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

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    Aug 2, 2007

    I teach 5th grade science(this will be my second year) and I was so scared last year. I hated science and couldn't believe that is what I would be teaching. I use very old textbooks so I try not to do a whole lot out of them.

    One thing I do, is make them copy vocabulary due before the unit. Yes, it is boring but it gets them looking through the unit and has helped them on tests. Also, I do Weekly Science Workout. It is a book by that title and has a bunch of questions that they answer. I give them two questions on Friday and they have until the following Friday to research it. It completely follows the things that we won't get to in regards to state testing and helps them a lot. If you want the questions I asked them you can PM me

    I also implemented a science fair with the 7th and 8th grade teacher. It was amazing and the kids loved it. But it is hard to implement and my other teacher was wonderful in doing a lot of the hard work.

    I would LOVE to do science notebooks this year. Can someone tell me how to implement them or give me a website they use?

    Good luck..and I have a ton of websites that I use also if you would like. oh, and the Mailbox science books are GREAT to use for experiments.
     
  16. goopp

    goopp Devotee

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    Aug 2, 2007

  17. meridian

    meridian Rookie

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    Aug 4, 2007

    I just found out I will be teaching math and science again this year :2up: I taught math and science 2 years ago. Then, last year, everything. And, now this year, we're going back to departmentalizing.

    Everyone has given you great tips. And thanks, Mrs.Jasztal, for that extensive list of plans! Also, the implementation of science notebooks helps so much! I'll find a couple websites that were helpful to me.

    As agdamity said, make sure you meet regularly with your team. It's also helpful to integrate literacy with science and math. Science and Literacy in the K-8 Classroom is an excellent resource!

    Curious, those of you who are departmentalizing, why did you make that decision? (maybe I need to start a new thread)
     
  18. latybug

    latybug Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2007

    Departmentalizing was chosen by my district 4-6 grades. My new principal is very strict. Not sure how much literacy she will allow me to use with science. She doesn't even want me putting AR books for the kids in my room. She told me she didn't hire me for reading. Looks like it is going to be a long year!
    Don't know how often the other math and science teachers meet but I have friends in the district that can help me out also. One teaches 6th grade Math the other teaches 6th grade Math and Science. My grade level team is great. One first year teacher and one veteran teacher. They have been very helpful.
     

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