50% as a minimum score

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Googs, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. Googs

    Googs Rookie

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    Jun 26, 2007

    I have always used a grading policy that no work = no points. I hear of school districts where the minimum grade that can be entered (per assignment, or at the end of the term?) must be no lower than 50%. If you think about it, every other grade is a 10% range. Is using a 50% minimum giving a student hope or unjustified points. What do you think?
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jun 26, 2007

    I hate, hate, hate this policy! I believe that zero effort equals zero points, period. If I came to school and didn't put forth any effort, I'd be fired.
     
  4. Bitsy Griffin

    Bitsy Griffin Companion

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    I would much rather drop a certain number of grades than give points for no effort.
     
  5. srh

    srh Devotee

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    I know it's not the same thing, but I am grateful to my high school geometry teacher (1972) who gave me an automatic 50% on any work that showed I actually TRIED. It's the only way I passed the class. It was my sophomore year, and I truly did not get most of what transpired in class. But EVERY night, I dutifully spent my homework time slaving over it, trying my best. I'm one of those who should have waited a year to take the class, and even then....ugh...just don't know how well I could have done. But the teacher did a great favor to me by not penalizing my INABILITY to get the answers right. Does that make sense??

    On the other hand, I agree that NO EFFORT should reap no reward!
     
  6. hapyeaster

    hapyeaster Rookie

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    My school has a Zero Tolerance for "0"!! I have to send students to Z.A.P (Zeros aren't permitted) if they have a zero. IF the complete the assignment in Z.A.P., then the max they can get is 60. Not sure how I really feel about it, but it is WAY more work on me to do ZAP, and in the long run, I don't think it makes much difference with the repeat offenders.
     
  7. DaveF

    DaveF Companion

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    Jun 26, 2007

    Zero effort should equal zero points. (0=0 not 0=.5)
    When these kids grow up and get jobs, will their employer pay them half wage for not showing up? I don't think so.
     
  8. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Exactly! What are we trying to teach our students by rewarding them for not doing any work?! I have never heard of a policy like this, but I certainly do NOT agree with it. This is creating a false reality for students. This policy does not reflect life at all, and students need to learn to accept responsibility for their work. If they put in the effort and try their best then they deserve some credit. Not showing up and and not doing any work does not deserve any credit at all. Period. 0 work = 0%.
     
  9. cmorris

    cmorris Comrade

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    Jun 27, 2007

    I have this policy in my school, except no child can get below a 60. The reasoning is so that the child can salvage their grade. If they get a 0, it can be pretty hard to recover from that. If they consistently make 60s, they will still earn a F.

    I have to say, though, it is more of an unspoken policy. I have given 0s anyway when warranted. I only had one child that received a 0 on rare occassions. I give the 60s if the assignment was complete, but wrong.
     
  10. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    I would not have felt grateful for a "you poor thing, we know you can't really do it so we'll just GIVE you a few points so your self-esteem won't plummet" piece of condescension. I would have been ashamed, which is how a zero ought to make someone feel.

    No effort? No points.

    If they're genuinely trying, there will be a few points. EARNED points, not freebies. How unfair to the students who choose to do the work and really earn their points!

    I would much rather admit defeat and fail than receive unearned points. And I have, on occasion, done just that. I let my own children reap the consequences of their own actions a time or two, too, in regard to grades. In regard to just about everything, in fact.

    High F? Low F? What difference does it make if the points aren't really theirs to begin with? Let the record show a zero if that is the true record of a student. Future employers have a right to know the truth about someone's work ethic.

    Report cards aren't supposed to be warm fuzzies unless the fuzzies are earned. Report cards are supposed to report the student's actual earned scores.

    What's next? Free points for TRYING to get the ball in the basket, poor thing, give him half for aiming in the right direction and trying? I think not. Either the ball goes in the basket or it doesn't. There are no points for intention. If Mommy stormed out of the bleachers and demanded points for her sweet baby because he TRIED SO HARD and it WASN'T FAIR that he didn't have the ability the other players had and he deserved some POINTS, dagnabit, the entire community would rise up and laugh her out of the county, and good riddance.

    Ditto for academics.

    Item: I am not talking about special education necessarily; I am referring to students who don't work, or who don't work hard enough. The zero students.

    If they truly work, they'll get a few points on their own. Real points, not condescending pity points that really ought to be humiliating.
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I'm the Special Ed teacher who will tell others teachers to fail "my kids" if they don't do the work--no token grades from me. If they need help completing a history assignment or writing a science lab, I'm there for them--if they don't do it, they fail. Token grades are "easy"--the teacher doesn't have much explaining to do, they don't have to call home to dicuss failing or missing grades, the parents aren't too upset and the kids don't grumble too much. But, whoever said that teaching was an easy job?
     
  12. Edelweiss

    Edelweiss Rookie

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    I grew up in Oklahoma, and our class was the first in our district to institute the ZAP program. I can honestly tell you that ZAP ruined me academically. Instead of dealing with the consequences of not doing my homework (a zero) I simply missed recess every day to go to ZAP and do my homework there. Because I scored well on tests, all those 60s on homework assignments didn't hurt me much - I still got Bs and the occasional C. ZAP taught me how to procrastinate and how to get around the system, and I spent the rest of my educational career trying to overcome that. Also, I don't know if it's the same in TX, but in OK we had to get a ZAP notice signed by a parent if we didn't turn something in. I first became adept at "forgetting" to bring mine in, and later became a masterful forger. My parents had no idea whatsoever that I was having problems in school, and a B was acceptable in our house, so I got away with it. I HATE ZAP!
     
  13. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

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    Jun 27, 2007

    Our district does not do this for assignments. However, we have a "grading floor" of 50 for the first and fourth six weeks. After dropping the lowest grade or two, I rarely have to bump anyone up to a 50 to meet the floor.
     
  14. HMM

    HMM Cohort

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    Jun 27, 2007

    This is related to the discussion here so I thought I'd rehash it.
     
  15. wig

    wig Devotee

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    Jun 27, 2007

    I have no problem with 50% being the lowest grade given. BUt thank heavens I do not have to give credit for zero effort given. Tell me what THAT is teaching them.
     
  16. mstnteacherlady

    mstnteacherlady Cohort

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    Jun 27, 2007

    I teach in a low income school with a high rate of Hispanic students in ELL classes. Last year, I had 2 students who transferred to our school in Feb. and were in ELL, but refused to speak English in the classroom and did not do any work (in my room or ESL). I had to give these students a C as a grade because I was not allowed to give them anything lower. They're not learning anything by just being handed a passing grade! When will they learn? (when they get a job and a good evaluation is not automatically given, probably.) It's frustrating, to say the least.
     
  17. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Jun 27, 2007

    My kids get a 30% it goes in the gradebook as a 30%. If they get a 0% it goes in the gradebook as a 0%. No work=no credit. 30% credit=30% in gradebook.

    I do offer some extra credit and drop the lowest quiz grade.
     
  18. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Jun 28, 2007

    I drop the lowest quiz grade and add its points as extra credit. I don't want them to lose earned points! But students who do nothing? They get the zero that they earned. People should get what they deserve.
     

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