5/days till subtest II! are you ready?

Discussion in 'Multiple Subject Tests' started by forget-me-not, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 15, 2005

    Hear, hear! I'm beaming on your behalf, forget-me-not: THIS is how to beat - or, better, redeem - this CSET thing.
     
  2. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 15, 2005

    And two congruent right triangles back to back give you an isosceles triangle (because the hypotenuses have to be congruent too). From which it follows that any isosceles triangle can be divided through the side that isn't equal into two congruent right triangles, and furthermore that the angle that's divided is bisected (divided exactly in half).

    Cool!
     
  3. maximum

    maximum Rookie

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    Jul 15, 2005

    Cheers to you forget me not and teacher groupie hopefully tomorrow will be the final time for subtest II. So I think I finally got the concepts of what makes wind? The ecosystem on a praire, and the life cycles of butterflies and leopard frogs. But I am still a little unsure about Sir Issac Newtons experiment. Is this correct teacher groupie I am wiggin out today :O If 2 objects fall at the same time from a roof or lets say the kids at the park each drop a basketball and a tennis ball from the monkey bars am I correct in saying that the 2 balls will fall at exactly the same rate if we ignore wind resistance? Galileos experiment proved this hyporhesis correct. The acceleration of a falling object is independent of the objects mass. Why is this true? Because Sir Issac would show a few decades later that acceleration depends upon both force and mass. While there is greater force acting on the larger object, this force is cancelled out by the objects greater mass. The two objects will fall actually they are pulled to the earth at exactly the same rate? Is this right teacher groupie am I getting the concept?
    Finally I know its down to the wire but I am still confused about how a see saw works with kids at the park. If I take my grandkids one is eight and the other is three to the park and they want to play on the see saw how do i distribute them so the thing will balance. I know if Megan sits forward and Jessie sits towards the back it blances better but why??? Please help with this one conce[pt please I know it has something to do with the fulcrum center point but I do not get it?
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    As to Newton, yes'm, you've got it. The only circumstance under which object A hits later than object B is when object A gets pushed off course: imagine dropping a ping-pong ball and a marble at the same time in front of a fan that's blowing: the marble hits first and the ping-pong ball travels a lot farther downwind before IT hits. Think also about which one will hurt more were it to hit your toes.

    For the seesaw: This is a class 1 lever, fulcrum in the middle. Now imagine that Megan (the 8-year-old, yes?) alone is on one side of the seesaw and you're holding onto the other end. If Megan is at the far end of her side, you have to work harder to push down your end, but she on her end moves just as far as your end does. If she's near the fulcrum, it's much easier to push down your end, but she doesn't travel nearly as far. If the seesaw were a plank lying on (but not attached to) a log, you could balance it in three ways: (a) by moving Megan in so Jessie doesn't have to move her as far; (b) by moving Jessie out so she moves farther than Megan does; or (c) by moving the plank (functionally, moving the fulcrum) so that Megan's end is shorter than Jessie's end.

    It's all about magnification of force: when the effort (the push) travels farther than the load (the kid), force is magnified. This principle also explains why carts with big wheels are easier to push than carts with small wheels: the load itself (the cart and its contents) is traveling the same distance, but the bigger wheel's bigger circumference means the wheel travels farther as the cart goes.

    Hope this helps.

    Please take time off tonight, okay?
     
  5. maximum

    maximum Rookie

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    Jul 16, 2005

    Thank you teacher groupie!

    Thanks teacher groupie you do a wonderful anology on these concepts. Well Saturday 7:30 a.m is fast approaching and my best wishes go out to all taking this exam. Today started out bad as comcast was down and my ace the cset software is useless without the internet. But thanks to this site and teacher groupie I have tons of index cards to read and try to retain in the brain :) Good luck to eveyone and teacher groupie hopefully this time I will be able to email you and say I PASSED!!!!!
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 16, 2005

    Glad to have been of help, maximum, though all credit goes to you.
     
  7. forget-me-not

    forget-me-not Rookie

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    Jul 20, 2005

    exhausted and so frustrated

    teachergroupe...lets get back to the two balls falling and their different mass...i stated all of the gravitational equations, like work=force x distance, and speed= rate/time, because i didn't know just which one to use...i was so afraid! i thought if i mentioned the ratio of the difference of the objects, and how one was influenced by the atmosphere, and how much more force the denser object had, that might be right. i hope i got at least a one on two of the essays i know i only got part of the answer right on, and that is a small part! i am really afraid i might not have passed...i feel so awful about the way they trick you into the right answers, and the way they expect you to be a rocket scientist! for crying out loud! i just want to teach elementary school age children their grade level concepts! i wish i understood this new age testing style, what happened to the test that asked you for the right answer straight forward?...no wonder so many people don't do well on tests...pose the question so we understand it!
    do they even realize how many learning styles humans have?
    how many can we miss on the multiple choice, and essays? i know that you need to get 70% on the multiple choice, and 30% on the essays, but how can that be broken down? :confused:
    help! forget-me-not
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I like that you referred to density.

    Let's do this with a somewhat different case: let's say we've got a tabletop fan blowing and that we've got two ordinary balloons: one's partly inflated (blown up) and one isn't. If we drop both in the stream of air blowing from the fan, what's going to happen? If we drop them close to the fan, they'll both get pushed away but the inflated balloon will get pushed farther; if we drop them farther away from the fan but still in the airstream, the uninflated balloon will drop more or less straight down, whereas the inflated balloon will get pushed farther away before it lands. So what's going on here? Well, the greater volume of the inflated balloon makes for more air resistance. Interestingly, the inflated balloon actually has more mass than the uninflated balloon, because it's got the mass of the latex (or whatever they're making balloons of these days) plus the mass of the air inside. And the balloons will travel at the same speed, but the inflated balloon will travel farther before it touches down (it turns out that a ball rolls down a ramp at the same speed that it drops straight down).

    I think you got this question at least partly right, though I need to add that neither work=force x distance nor speed= rate/time is relevant here (neither is a gravitational equation as such). I also have to add that the concepts on which this question depends ARE elementary-school concepts, at least according to the California content standards: the interaction of gravity and surface area/density IS something that elementary students are supposed to understand, at least on a hands-on level - gravity's in the content standards for grade 2. As to different learning styles, use that concept to help you in the test: figure out the basic principle(s) (you did in this instance) and then imagine as vividly as possible letting kids learn about it in different ways, then draw on that to shape your answer.

    As to how the test breaks down: what's true is that multiple choice questions account for 70% of the possible points and constructed responses questions for the remaining 30%. But the subtest is scored holistically, which means that if you got all the multiple choice questions right, you should pass even if the constructed response performance is kind of dismal.

    Hope this helps.
     
  9. forget-me-not

    forget-me-not Rookie

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    Jul 21, 2005

    your welcome! i am not sure that i am going anywhere soon either...subtest 2 was so hard for me! but i wrote out essay 4 in essay 1's spot and had to erase and that just about gave me a heart attack literally! i was frazzled! just study! study! study! and ask lots of questions now! it helps everyone else to interact and the more we interact the more info we get in our sweet brains!

    this message is to anyone who has to take any of the tests: make sure that you are writing your essay on the right page!
     
  10. forget-me-not

    forget-me-not Rookie

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    yeah this does help, however what about if they were not filled with the same type of mass? and their weight was 10 times different too? lets say one was a heavy material and one was air? then what?

    okay if i got all of the multiple choice right..... but wrong.... i know i missed at least 5. so what is the partial credit....sounds like because i added so many other things in the mix i might just get a one on one of the essays.

    i will not give up ship though, i will take the test again...but i notice that they do not give you enough time to register if you have to take it again before the deadline without paying a late fee.
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 22, 2005

    Mass is atoms and the stuff atoms are made of: it doesn't matter what kind of mass. My point was that the inflated balloon is actually heavier than the uninflated one - but its matter is spread out over a LOT more volume, which means it's denser, which means the air from the fan is going to push it around more. A balloon that's as full as the inflated balloon but that contains iron filings will have more mass because iron (which is farther down on the periodic table than oxygen or carbon or helium or nitrogen or hydrogen or most if not all other constituents of ordinary air) has more mass than those other things, and the filing-filled balloon will drop faster and straighter than either the uninflated balloon or the inflated one. Note that any proton has the same mass as any other proton, and any neutron the same mass as any other neutron, and any electron the same mass as any other electron... which means that the atom with more protons, neutrons, and electrons has to have more mass than the atom with fewer protons etc. Iron has 26 protons (not that anyone's going to expect you or anyone else to know that off the top of your head).

    Yes, it's true that unofficial results don't come out till after the regular registration deadline... BUT take heart: the late fee is automatically waived for anyone who signs up to retake the CSET on receiving an unhappy result.
     

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