5/6th Grade Procedures and Consequences

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by OUOhYeah, Jun 18, 2015.

  1. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    21

    Jun 19, 2015

    True, but I want them to be reading. The first 30 minutes is when they are eating breakfast, so I don't foresee a lot of homework being done there. I do however, foresee the last 30 minutes being utilized every day.

    Also we will be using Daily Language Practice and Spelling City a lot.
     
  2. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    450

    Jun 19, 2015

    I've taught in urban settings, and I never could get reading logs to work for me. I used reading conferences to make sure students were reading. Logs never got completed for a variety of reasons: didn't want to, slept in their family car that night, played "mom" while mom was at work, no electricity, etc. These were fourth and fifth graders.
     
  3. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Messages:
    1,023
    Likes Received:
    444

    Jun 19, 2015

    I think a lot of the things you wrote out in your rules are things that can be established as firm procedures without being written out for students to see. For example... line expectations, pencil sharpening, morning greetings, etc. Having it written out is great for you because you know exactly what you want to see and can stick to it better that way, but giving to students a document that looks like that first post most likely will not help with control of the room. Use the first week or so to teach procedures and practice, but keep it firm and positive, not just a list of rules and regulations.

    Another option (and if someone has suggested this already, I apologize -- I didn't read every reply) is to have the students be involved in some of the rule making. For example, ask them: What are some ways we can make a positive environment? What are some things that would show you are being responsible for ____? Things like that. It gives the students some say in their learning rather than just being TOLD what to do, and "difficult" students may be more willing to follow rules that they helped come up with than rules that were forced upon them at the beginning of the year.
     
  4. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,653
    Likes Received:
    232

    Jun 19, 2015

    I certainly didn't mean to attack you originally. I'm sorry if my post came across as harsh - it just shocked me a bit. We were missing a lot of background information in your original post. For one thing, I had no idea you were a new teacher, because it wasn't mentioned. I also think the tone came across as kind of intense and forceful due to all of the caps. You sound completely different in your other posts!

    You mentioned later that this is not a document that students will see, but that was unclear as well in the original post. I agree with others - this is a great thing to have for yourself, but not something that students should see.

    Just a couple thoughts from the replies and updates:
    You may not want students reading while they're eating. Are they reading YOUR classroom library books? I would feel a little uncomfortable having food out around my own purchased books every day, but maybe that is just me. I personally do not do traditional "morning work" - my students read or write. It's the food that would complicate it for me.

    I do use sticks to call on students in my classroom...sometimes. I only use them after students have had an opportunity to discuss with a partner or with their group. I never "cold call" on students that way. Just something to think about.

    I do agree with you that independent reading is incredibly valuable. I try to have 20-30 minutes of it every day. (My goal really is 30). I'm taking from The Book Whisperer and Reading in the Wild, books by Donalyn Miller, for this. However, I do conference with students during that time so I can check in with them. One idea you may want to try is reading letters. I do this in a Google doc, but you could use a plain journal too - that's how I started the year. The kids write me a letter about what they're reading, and I write back each week. I have 28 students, so I did 6 each day Mon-Thurs, and 4 on Fri. In the letters, I would ask them questions to answer, like "What do you think a theme in your book is?" or "What are some character traits you notice in _____?" The kids seemed to really like this, and I was able to check in with them more frequently. Essentially, this is like the "sentences" you mentioned, except it's written in a letter form and I actually reply, which makes the kids have more buy in. Just something to consider.

    You have the right idea figuring this all out before school starts.

    Have you heard of the book Dream Class? I actually haven't read all of it, but I know there is a good section in there on teaching procedures at the beginning of the year. I think I'll reread it, myself.
     
  5. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,468
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jun 19, 2015

    I also like the idea you have of writing it all out for your own reference while you are establishing your expectations with students. I also didn't have time to read your entire original post or the revision doc. Are you keeping this private or sharing it with parents?
     
  6. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    165

    Jun 20, 2015

    Your updated version is better. I'll still say the stick idea is not something I would do personally. I know it takes some buy in, but I will again suggest using Class Dojo to track points instead of marbles. It's pretty easy to do and you can better track individual student's points and see whole class points. You are also able to take away points as well. It's very customizable.

    It seems to me and correct me if I'm wrong, that you have the marble jar and another system, stickers/points for homework. Having more than one system for keeping track of goal earning prizes will prove to be tedious. As a first year teacher you'll want to have a system that's not a lot of work to maintain. You'll alrwady have tons to worry about!!! Trust me.

    This year I actually started to have my students track other's behavior with dojo points at their table groups to keep them in check once May came around. I switched the person monitoring the behaviors everyday and my kids loved being the "table captain" for the day. Of course I never would have had students done this in the beginning of the year but it made my life easier towards the end. I will probably try it again next year, probably mid year.

    I also like Yellowdaisies suggestion of the reading letters. I may need to borrow that idea myself!
     
  7. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    21

    Jun 20, 2015

    Okay, so maybe I will use the sticks after I have taught the lesson and they have practiced it. For example, when we are going over homework? That's what I was thinking of doing from the get go. I know it sounded like, here I'm doing a stick like right now.

    I love the idea about a letter to me each day. That could be their reader response to me and also get them reading 30 minutes a day. I like that a lot better than my reading log idea. That way the book gets read every day, and I still have an assignment for them to do.
     
  8. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,488
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jun 20, 2015

    I'm very strict regarding bathroom rules. I only allow one student at a time. As an experienced fifth grade teacher, I've seen an increased amount of misbehavior going on in the bathroom throughout the years. I don't know if it's that they share ideas with upcoming fifth graders but it just seems that it gets worse every year. This year, for instance, we had incidence like using the floor instead of the toilet, kissing and taking pictures. Lot of the misbehavior this year occurred with girls.
    So I've learned to only allow one student at a time to prevent or at least have a better handle on situations that may occur while theyre going to the bathroom.
     
  9. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,014
    Likes Received:
    473

    Jun 20, 2015

    30 minutes is a long time for breakfast. You can still teach while they are eating breakfast with 5th and 6th graders. I find that my students are done with breakfast in 10-15 minutes. If someone isn't done that is fine. They can finish eating while you are teaching.
     
  10. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,418
    Likes Received:
    1,172

    Jun 20, 2015

    Another option during breakfast is reading aloud - our school has lunches in the classrooms (no cafeteria) and one way I recapture a bit of other instruction time and also make managing behaviors easier too, is to use 20 or so of the 30 minutes to read from our current read aloud.
     
  11. newteech

    newteech Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 20, 2015

    Teachers should never punish kids with academics - such as forcing them to write a multi-paragraph letter.

    Instead teachers should work to instill a lifetime love of learning within each kid.
     
  12. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Jun 20, 2015

    You wouldn't have a student reflect in writing on a poor choice they have made and its effects on others?
     
  13. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,653
    Likes Received:
    232

    Jun 20, 2015

    Glad you like the idea. :) To clarify - I only have them write a letter once a week. No way could I reply to 28 letters each day! Also, I find that their letters have more content when there are less of them. :2cents:

    Read aloud during breakfast is a fabulous idea! And I agree with another poster - 5th graders will not take 30 minutes to eat. I had breakfast in the classroom with 1st graders and it only took 15-20 minutes.
     
  14. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    21

    Jun 20, 2015

    Let me clarify, breakfast is from 7:30 - 8:00am. Students arrive at different times in the morning. I don't want to read aloud to them during breakfast unless I notice that all of my students are there at let's say 7:45. I love this idea, just have to see it first :)

    Also, I thought about that too when I saw what I posted before about the reading letters. I would only have one group a day do that and I can use a simple rubric, like 5pts for answering the question and 5pts for grammar and spelling.

    Also, yes I have no shame in making my students write an apology letter. The students that I have seen from this grade level need to learn how to write correctly. The practical advice I will give them to make it meaningful is this: You will be writing cover letters and resumes so please do take this seriously. You will also need to know how to organize your ideas in a coherent thought.
     
  15. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    450

    Jun 20, 2015

    They are too far away from cover letters and resumes to care about them. Research has shown writing forced apology letters to be ineffective.

    You said you will be working in an urban setting. Is it also low SES? If so, you may want to read Ruby Payne's A Framework on Poverty. It will help give you some insight to your students.
     
  16. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    21

    Jun 20, 2015

    I'd like to see that research.
     
  17. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Jun 20, 2015

    What about writing a reflection of the choices made and its effect on others?
     
  18. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    21

    Jun 20, 2015

    That might be an idea, because I want the consequence to get them to use a skill and refine that skill. I like this idea a lot though.
     
  19. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    450
  20. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    450

    Jun 21, 2015

  21. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    21

    Jun 21, 2015

    Even though I read the article, I still want them to write. That's why I am going to use the idea of them explaining what they did and how they can fix it, vs. the apology letter.
     
  22. BreezyGirl

    BreezyGirl Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2015
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    7

    Jun 21, 2015

    I've been in classrooms similar to this. It broke my heart as I found the behaviour/issues in the classroom stemmed from their life circumstances.

    Sticks: I use these when I'm doing drama and want to randomly choose students for specific activities. I also use these to be fair when choosing students for certain things in the classroom. Kids know when teachers call on the same person for everything. :)

    Line Up: I am firm on quiet. I will send the class back to their desks to try it again. I will even send the class back to the classroom if they are being disruptive in the hallway. I explain why it's important to be quiet in the hall and when a noisy class passes, I use that as a teachable moment.

    Consequences: I believe in logical consequences. I discuss with the class what a logical consequence is. If I know a student loves to be outside, I'm not going to send him out of class to do three laps around the school. Logical consequences --- If you take time away from me or the class because of being disruptive, you owe me that time but on your time. It could be that I have free time planned. That student misses out on a portion of it. Another example is if a student writes on their desk, they clean the tops of all the desks. The consequence must be related to the behaviour. I always talk to the student about what they did and why it isn't appropriate. Once they do their consequence, it's done. I don't speak to them about it. I have found that the most behavioral kids I have had need to feel cared for even when they mess up. At home, they may not get this.

    Homework/Reading: Keep in mind that many kids will not have support at home. So, homework may not get done because the student doesn't know how to do it and there is no one willing to help him. Or, that will ensure it's done. I won't send stuff home (or if I do it's what they can handle) if I have a class where there is little or no help from home.

    Timeouts: I'll send students to another area of the classroom. Some kids would rather wait in the hall than listen to lesson so this would be rewarding for inappropriate behaviour. But, sometimes a hallway send out is necessary. I'll get the rest of the kids working and then speak to the student in the hall.

    I don't agree with you being told to be rough. Rough sounds too much like a drill sergeant. I believe the correct way to describe is to be firm, fair, patient and empathetic. Once you gain respect from the kids, it will be easier. The only way to gain the respect is to show them you care and that you like them. I have met teachers where their body language and tone have said otherwise. This is wrong. :(

    Last thing... Go in confident. Kids are good at sensing lack of control in teachers. They will take advantage of this if they know they can.
     
  23. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Jun 21, 2015

    I absolutely agree with you on the writing. There is nothing wrong with having a student reflect on their actions and its effect on others.
     
  24. heatherberm

    heatherberm Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2014
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    204

    Jun 21, 2015

    I'd agree that there's nothing wrong with having students reflect on their actions and its effect on others but be prepared for them to potentially have a very difficult time doing this well in writing. If they're low readers, they're probably struggling writers and if their social skills etc. are poor, they may genuinely not always recognize what triggers their behaviors or how it effects others. They might get more out of doing that in conversation with you. I think both things - writing and reflecting on behavior - are super important but you might want to at least be flexible about changing if they end up not being a good combination.
     
  25. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    13,843
    Likes Received:
    1,678

    Jun 21, 2015

    Also, be aware that the writing you assign them to reflect on their behaviour may take time away from other assigned work and will begin a vicious cycle.
     
  26. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Jun 21, 2015

    Oh, of course. Like most things in teaching this is not, "shame on you, go write what you did, why, and how you will change it." It will take work, scaffolding, modeling, ideas,..etc on the part of the teacher...but this is what we do.
     
  27. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Jun 21, 2015

    Can you please provide something that proves a viscious cycle will result from having students reflect on their actions and behaviors? This is part of classroom management, it requires time, and pays off 10 fold in the end.
     
  28. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    13,843
    Likes Received:
    1,678

    Jun 21, 2015


    Please note that I did not say that having students reflect on behaviours isn't important.

    However, I believe that lengthy written reflections, done well, take time, if not during the school day, then at home. Those students who may be reluctant writers, or are reluctant or struggling students, are going to find it a struggle to complete written reflections on top of the work they are required to do. Not completing the reflection, or the required work, may result in more written reflections, which may result in more work not being completed.

    I hold my students accountable for their actions, and reflection is an important part of that accountability. The reflection, however, is rarely written.
     
  29. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,488
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jun 21, 2015

    I'm so pro writing and it has been very effective for me particularly when searching for the truth. For some reason children reveal more when they have to explain it on paper. Lots of 'stuff' comes out that I may not have been aware. It also serves as documentation in severe cases. Another benefit is the saving of classroom time. I may have them do it during recess time or at a time that it's not interfering with classroom time. Often times conversations become too convoluted and take up too much time and so that's when it comes to writing.
    This was a year of having to do this more than ever and it was very effective in eliminating some issues that were going on with students.
     
  30. OUOhYeah

    OUOhYeah Comrade

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    21

    Jun 21, 2015

    I could not find this thread! I guess it was moved, lol!!! I cannot thank you enough Pashtun for that tip on writing. Do you give them a piece of paper, or do you make them use their own paper? I was thinking about using a composition notebook and having the students write in it, that way I could keep track of it. However, it might be a bad idea considering other students would read what others wrote.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. MntnHiker,
  2. Pi-R-Squared,
  3. vickilyn,
  4. Backroads
Total: 400 (members: 7, guests: 369, robots: 24)
test