2nd grade inclusion teachers?

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by mrs.oz, Jan 17, 2008.

  1. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    Jan 17, 2008

    I was wondering if anyone teaches 2nd grade inclusion that can help me with some suggestions for my own child. He is SLD, ADD, and has trouble with Sensory Processing. He has trouble staying on task in the classroom. He is beginning to shut down and easily frustrated. He reads above grade level but has problems with fluency. I mainly see him shut down when it comes to putting words on paper. I will post more later as I get responses.
     
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  3. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Jan 17, 2008

    Does he get sensory breaks during the day? I have kiddos that funcion much better when they can go to the sensory room at set times during the day. We also have a body sock for use in the classroom. In the past, I've also had a special spot in the room that is a 'safe' place to go when a child has needed a break.

    I would suggest a meeting with the clasroom teacher and SPED teacher to discuss some of your academic concerns. You might be able to accomodate through someone scribing his answers or teaching him typing (I've seen both done with second graders).
     
  4. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    Jan 18, 2008

    They don't give him breaks that I know of. I think sometimes they feel offended by my recommendations because I was a teacher. I just resigned. We are supposed to have a meeting with the TAT Team soon. I have never seen them cut his assignments this year and they are beginning to mark answers wrong which is bringing his grades down. He has made A's and B's all this year and last year. He is beginning to shut down. They make him sit in from recess to finish all of his work. They have not cut homework assignments either. Sometimes it takes us 2 hours to get his homework finished. Last year the teacher assigned him a peer tutor. That is one of my suggestions for them to do. I am also going to ask them to break his assignments into segments. I mean lets face it, he is not a normal every day child and never will be. They punish him for his disability by giving him a yellow dot for daydreaming. I have even looked into sending him to a private school but it is too expensive. I try to encourage him and do reminders daily as he leaves the house. There excuse is that he needs to learn to do it because each year will get harder but if it was that easy for him then he would not be in inclusion.
     
  5. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Jan 18, 2008

    Accommodations that should be listed on his IEP. (based on what you have written.)
    *Reduced classwork. (Doing odd only or even only problems on assignments longer than 10 items.) Reduced spelling (no more than 5 words per week.)
    *Instructions broken down by steps. Verbal reminders of steps to be given, and redirection as needed.
    *Reduced homework. (No more than 5 problems in math or 5 spelling words.)
    *Breaks between assignments.
    *Under NO circumstances should he be missing recess, PE, Art or any other special activity to complete work. Work should be REDUCED rather than taking his specials or recess. Legally, he has a right to participate in these activities with his grade level peers.

    Please don't expect all As and Bs. That will be nice if it happens, but learning is the goal -- not specific grades. This is a great time to help your child understand that an A or a B does NOT make him a better person. Grades are letters. It is good to do well, but as long as you do your best, those grades are JUST letters!


    One other point I'd like to make. Don't feel bad about not being able to send your child to private school. Private schools *often* don't have special education staff or services. In my experience, children in public schools on IEPs get just as much, if not more, individual attention as private school students.

    Good luck!
     
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Jan 18, 2008

    Mrs. Oz,

    I just noticed you are from Virginia. Is your son's teacher aware that it is ILLEGAL in the state of Virginia to not give recess? (I realize MANY teachers disregard it, but it is still the law!) If not, I'm sure her administrator is quite aware of it!

    All students in Virginia are entitled to *unstructured activities and free play* on a daily basis. It can be indoors or out of doors. PE cannot be used to meet this requirement.

    Just wanted to make sure you are aware of this.
     
  7. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Jan 18, 2008

    I agree w/ RainStorm- these things need to get on his IEP. Sometimes you gotta make a little noise to get heard. I would (respectfully, of course), make a little 'noise' on your son's behalf to get them to accomodate him.
     
  8. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    Feb 18, 2008

    I am taking my son to see a developmental pediatrician this Thursday. I will let you know the outcome.
     
  9. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    Feb 23, 2008

    They found that my son has Asperger Syndrome. A lot of things will have to change now at school. They also say that he suffers from OCD.
     
  10. bakingdiva

    bakingdiva Companion

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    Feb 23, 2008

    I have a student with OCD for sure and she is being tested for Asperger's too. I would never have her miss recess or PE to finish her work. Good grief, she'd be there all day. I give shortened assignments, more redirection, more 1:1 and she hasn't even gone to ARD yet. That's just common sense! Why would the teachers punish your son for something beyond his control? I would certainly be talking to the administrators and teachers as soon as possible. Good luck!
     
  11. mrs.oz

    mrs.oz Companion

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    Feb 24, 2008

    They said a lot of things would be changed now that he has been labeled. I hope so. I never have dealt with a child with autism in the 12 1/2 years that I have taught so I need to also learn some coping skills and ways to help him at hope. First thing I need to do is get my home a little more organized. Maybe I can now that I have resigned.
     
  12. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    Feb 24, 2008

    About 7 years ago I taught a young boy who had several sensory disorders. His reading and writing skills were very advanced for a 7 year old. I brought my concerns about the sensory disorders up to the mom at a conference. She saw exactly what I was seeing at home. She took it upon herself to see a pediatric neurologist immediately and her son was diagnosed with Aspergers. I honestly don't remember if an IEP was written up on this student as the following year they moved out of state. All I know is that if "Roy" needed to relax, stand at his seat, work at his own pace, etc. I let him. He excelled in my room. Try working with the teacher and explain to her what works at home and see if she can incorporate it into the classroom. I still keep in contact with "Roy" to this day. He is currently working on a novel and has an agent. He hopes to get it published by the spring and his mom thanks me to this day for all I did for her son.
     
  13. map

    map Companion

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    Feb 26, 2008

    He may benefit from a picture schedule so he can see how the day is going to progress. That would also help with his organization of assignments throughout the day. I have noticed that my students all benefit from that not just my special needs. A part time para ( if that's an option) could also help keep him focused so he completes assignments instead of getting a few things done in reading and then it's time to move on to the next subject. Before long a lot of things are started and nothing is completed. Unfortunately, that is because the requirements for all grades keep increasing even if it is not best for kids or age appropriate. I wish someone at the state level would figure that out. A para could also help the classroom teacher simplify the assignments or do an assignment orally with the child instead of always requiring paper/pencil tasks. Goodluck! If a para is not available than the above suggestions could be completed by the sped teacher. They have been trained to make these accomodations.
     

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