2021-2022 SY

Discussion in 'General Education' started by YoungTeacherGuy, Jun 16, 2021.

  1. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Jun 16, 2021

    Hi, everyone!

    Hope all is well with everyone. I haven’t logged in for several months. Been an interesting school year. We’ve gone from distance learning, to hybrid, back distance learning, to nearly everyone being in-person for half-day (8am-11am).

    I am apprehensive about 2021-2022. Many kids haven’t been to in-person school since March 2020. Students (& staff!) will need to rebuild stamina. We are slated to go back to fully in-person for all students (all day, everyday—business as usual). I feel as though students are going to struggle: academically, behaviorally, and socially!

    Any thoughts?

    Sincerely,
    YTG
     
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  3. whizkid

    whizkid Groupie

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    Jun 16, 2021

    The average student here is at least two years behind. It will take years to fix this.
     
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  4. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Jun 17, 2021

    I don’t have any thoughts besides we will all be in it together.

    I went from remote to two-day hybrid to remote to medical leave to four days in person. The kids mostly worked hard and behaved well. A few flopped completely. The 6th graders were feral.

    DH went from remote to two-day hybrid to five day hybrid. He decided to retire in May.

    I asked to be moved to another position, so I’m going to be a reading interventionist, then retire December 1. I’m too old for this.
     
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  5. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jun 17, 2021

    We were 100% in person for the majority of this year. We went remote in Nov. and Dec. and there were some class-specific quarantines at other times, but they weren't long. We did see behaviors and other issues really ramp up at the end of the year. Not only was it a super stressful year, but the previous year kids were largely done in March so I think that was hard on them too. I have never been so ready for a school year to end, and it seemed everyone at my school felt the same.

    For me, the absolute hardest thing about this past year was the uncertainty. Not knowing all summer what was going to happen, and things changing on a dime constantly throughout the year. As a specialist working with multiple grade levels, the quarantines had a much bigger impact on me. I'd find out at 7 PM that one of my classes was quarantined, and I'd have to make an entirely new schedule to start the next day in order to do remote services for those who were quarantined, and schedule in person services for the rest of the kids still in the building around that. Telling kids 1,000 times a day to put masks over their noses and dealing with no shared supplies was also a huge PITA.

    I think next year will be so much better because there won't be that uncertainty. I'm really hoping the other precautions (no shared supplies, masks, distancing, quarantining) go away as well. In the spring my district had said "normal school with masks" next year. However, that was before the mask mandate was lifted. It's been about a month now and masks are almost completely gone, so I don't think it seems reasonable to say in August that we're suddenly going to go back to wearing them 8 hours a day in schools.

    I do think it may be hard to go back to a 100% full time in person schedule. I may be in the minority on this one, but I found remote teaching to be significantly easier and less stressful than in person teaching. Although we were in person most of this past year, I got a 2 month "break" in the winter as well as a 1 week school-wide quarantine in Feb, and our student start date was pushed back in August by about 3 weeks this past year. My teammate and I were just talking about how we haven't had to just go to school, like normal, day after day, for 2 years now. I do think it will balance out without all of the other precautions/issues those cause though, if those precautions are removed.
     
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  6. Aces

    Aces Devotee

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    Jun 17, 2021

    But the thing is, everyone is in this boat together. This isn’t something that only effected one or two schools. This is something that hit all of us, and HARD. My state’s Board of Education sent out their end of year reports recently, and it’s estimated that over 70% of our public school students are at least a year behind. This is based on where they should be according to the state’s curriculum and pacing guide.

    Which to me, as an administrator, I can already feel the urge to get students back to where they should be. But there’s also an element of “all of the students are roughly level with their peers”. Our admin team — principal, the other VP, the lead guidance counselor, and myself — discussed this a lot our last week of work. We’re pretty much always a high performing school, and even we got hit hard and felt it really hard. We had to be on the call with the district where scores and stuff were announced and we were straight up embarrassed about our performance. But we were still in the top for the district and state.

    I guess the take away from this is that:
    1. We’re in this together. Everyone got hit hard.
    2. Nobody is where they’re supposed to be.
    3. And truthfully, it’s not going to magically be fixed in a single school year. We’re probably going to be feeling the effects of this until everyone that was in school last year and this past year graduate out of high school.
     
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  7. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    Jun 17, 2021

    The majority of students in my district have been in school 5 days a week for over 3 months now, and hybrid with half the students in school 5 days a week the rest of the year. There is a small amount of students though that were virtual all year and are returning to school next year. I do think it will be interesting to see those students compared to their peers who were in the building the majority of the school year.
     
  8. CherryOak

    CherryOak Comrade

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    Jun 18, 2021

    Well....each fall, I watch amazing kinder teachers battle in the cafeteria with how to line up and by winter it works out. Maybe if this year is consistent, it'll go better?? I am worried about stamina and behaviors. Then again, with the world telling them it was all too crazy to succeed, many didn't have a chance. They were permitted to struggle and took the excuse and ran. I think they're more capable than us adults realize and we should be careful what narrative we put out there. Shall we fake it til we make it?
     
  9. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Jun 19, 2021

    I feel this, having worked the past several years at a high performing school that cares greatly about test scores.

    The thing is, “on grade level” is an arbitrary measure. We shouldn’t make students feel behind or make parents and teachers worry about these numbers because literally everyone is in the same boat.

    That said, teachers were evaluated as per usual. A few great teachers are really upset as they were told their scores aren’t high enough, with no consideration to the circumstances of the school year.
     
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  10. Aces

    Aces Devotee

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    Jun 19, 2021

    We’re required by state law to inform parents exactly where their students are against every other student in our building. We’re also required to inform them on average how our school is compared to the rest of the district (both grade level specific and generally). As well as how the school/district compared to the rest of the state. We have a 4 page document we send out to parents at the end of the year explaining and breaking this information down.

    We had a lot of students that we really felt under performed, but because of the circumstances, we curved everyone to some degree. A lot of students that we passed really should have failed under normal circumstances, and that’s something we opted to do at a school level.

    We had a lot of teachers that we felt didn’t do as well as maybe we expected, but we also took into consideration that neither was the school year. For all of our teacher evaluations, we had a marginally lower average evaluation score. So we averaged everything and anything that was lower than the average we dropped and gave them the minimum average score. The way we did it was very very intentional because we know that anyone that’s below that average is potentially subject to non renewals, being ineligible for pay increases, etc etc etc. There’s levels below the average that the district looks at when they’re making their decisions for next year. The way we did it, nobody was below our average. Which, we kind of cheated, but we were trying to protect the teachers because it simply wasn’t a normal school year. Abnormal practice for an abnormal year.
     
  11. Aces

    Aces Devotee

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    Jun 19, 2021

    To add to this:

    We had two teachers in particular that we were really back and forth on what to do with. Had we of just let it ride as is, their stuff was low enough there’s no way they would have been back next year. They’re sisters and both extremely negative. They told us they were retiring anyways so it worked out in our favor.
     
  12. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Jun 20, 2021

    I feel bad for the older or less technologically inclined teachers. I was stressed by having to suddenly change to online instruction but I’m reasonably good at figuring technology out so I was fine. Some teachers, though, had to go from pencil and paper worksheets to online instruction and zoom overnight. We had very little training. I think some would say, that’s the job, deal with it, but it’s not what they signed up for and they weren’t given adequate training to really successfully implement these new tools, and then were marked down on having lower test scores or not as interactive instruction. I definitely can’t blame some for choosing to retire this year. On the other end of the spectrum, it was a rough year to start teaching also. I’d bet more first year teachers than usual chose to leave the profession after this year.
     
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  13. Aces

    Aces Devotee

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    Agreed. We tried to support our teachers as much as humanly possible. We had video calls, evening workshops, were available as much as possible. And even still, we had a lot who still struggled to flip the whole script basically. Which, I completely get. I feel like from an admin stand point we provided as much support as at possibly could. But even with that support, we couldn’t be in the classrooms with them everyday to hold their hands through each lesson.

    With those two in particular (they’re sisters and really close to each other), they’re extremely negative people in general. Absolutely refused to even try any of the strategies we offered, refused all of the support we offered, etc. Everytime you spoke to them, they always had very negative attitudes. It didn’t matter what the question was, it was going to be an extremely negative answer. We’d get calls/emails from parents where those two had been so rude to the parents that the parents were about to raise h-e-double hockey sticks over it.

    But then again, it didn’t take a pandemic to make those two like that. It just made it stand out more, because they stopped giving any effort to stop it.
     
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  14. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jun 20, 2021

    I had a first year teammate this year. I think what's going to be really hard for her is that she didn't get to see what a "normal" year is like at all. So even though the rest of us think next year is going to be better with most precautions gone, she'll kind of be doing another first year because it will be so different.
     
  15. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Jun 26, 2021

    I was in person and online all year. The kids who were failing in remote were pretty much forced to come in person after the first semester. (But most neighboring districts forced all remote students back at that time or earlier, so at least we still offered remote.) The kids who had been remote struggled with stamina and the pace the first week. Kids are resilient though. By the end of the second week, they were indistinguishable from those who had been in person from day 1. Many of those kids even made the A honor roll by the end of the year.
     
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  16. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Jun 27, 2021

    Like many others, my school went from all online to an option of hybrid or online later in the year. The students who came in, in general, were the ones who needed to. They were excellent for the first couple weeks and grades went up dramatically, but then did start to slide again the last month or so. Habits of going onto chat rooms with classmates, playing games during instruction, and watching YouTube videos will be hard to retrain at first I think. Many are very used to sitting at a screen and not having anyone actually know what they’re doing (I.e., they are sitting on the zoom but on other sites and not actually listening to instruction.)

    From a personal, non-teacher point of view, I get it. If I’m in a work meeting on zoom, I do truly think I’m able to listen and contribute while doing other things. And I think some students are too. But not everyone who things they are capable of this actually is. I like to let students listen to music in class, for instance, but some can work while they have music playing and some cannot. That personal awareness isn’t always there and it’s hard to teach.
     
  17. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jul 25, 2021

    I also haven't logged inn here for probably a year. This year was tough.
    However I think we'll be fine. Our school was and i s in the best position when it came too the pandemic. It's independent study so everyone was already set up and used to doing their work on their own and just meet once a week.
    Now, that sounds easy but we had a lot of students struggle, even those who were perfect students before. Just being at home parents being at home, lots of illnesses, death and tragedy, unemployment, uncertainty was to deal with especially for teenagers.
    some just simply didn't have the means to study and do homework house was overcrowded. Others just couldn't deal with the more lax accountability. Even though we zoomed every week, it was different than facing me and saying they didn't do their work.

    After spring break for teachers it was mandatory and students optional to go back to school. I was the only teacher at the school that was excited about going back. Working from home was awful. I convinced about half of my students to come to school and saw a huge improvement. they now had a safe place to do their work, many came more often or stayed longer. They missed the personal communication and it seemed like we were getting back to how things used to be. We had a great time going back.

    So because of how it was in the spring I think it will be great. Now it will be almost like we're back to normal. Here everyone will still need to wear masks regardless of vaccination status, once that goes, we are as we used to be.

    We are starting next Monday, we were added 4 more days to our contract. I've had a very busy and fun summer so I will be happy to go back. (we also got 45 minutes added to our days and a 3% Cola increase so our salary has significantly increased, which is unbelievable)
     

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