1st grade Language Arts routines

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by jennyd, Aug 1, 2006.

  1. jennyd

    jennyd Companion

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    Aug 1, 2006

    Hi :)

    I'm teaching first grade for the first year, and I'm wrestling with how to structure my LA routine. My school uses a basal, so I figured for whole-group I'd do something like this:

    Monday: Pre-reading
    Tuesday: Read story & discuss
    Wednesday: Reread & associated activity
    Thursday: post-reading activity (maybe a poem related to story)
    Friday: wrap up

    For those of you who teach first, does this seem like a good schedule? When I student taught it was 2nd grade and they didn't have a basal - strictly authentic literature - so I'm a not as familiar with the flow of things when using a basal.

    I plan on also doing centers/guided reading for some small group & individual instruction, and of course I'll have phonics and writing components. It's really just the bit about using the basal that has me concerned right now.

    Thanks for any insight you can offer!
     
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  3. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

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    Aug 1, 2006

    This sounds good. Which basal are you using? We use Scott Foresman and each day is layed out for us. Although, sometimes we have to make changes based on our schedules.
     
  4. jennyd

    jennyd Companion

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    Aug 1, 2006

    We've got Scott Foresman, too, but it's a really old version (mid-90's I think). They don't lay it out day-by-day. Just before-reading, reading, and after-reading.

    I'm ok with adjusting for things that come up, I just need some sort of base-schedule to work with. I'm glad you think it sounds ok, though :)
     
  5. SaraFirst

    SaraFirst Cohort

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    Aug 2, 2006

    Oh, wow. We have the 2007 version, so I'm guessing its a lot different. Does yours include phonics and spelling or do you have to come up with your own? Our version has EVERYTHING in it. (Really more than we want sometimes.)
     
  6. Jaicie

    Jaicie Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2006

    What a great thread, JennyD. I've wrestled with this myself with our Houghton Mifflin Literacy program in 2nd grade.

    In my experience, language arts lessons should be based on students' needs rather than on a schedule. Instruction should be developmentally appropriate for their level. If students grasp onto the story quickly and readily, and they can do the comprehension activities/lessons fairly easily (phonics, grammar, spelling, etc.), they'll be ready to move onto the next story. You might even be able to skip a mini lesson or two, depending on how extensive your basal is. (Houghton Mifflin Literacy has SO many lessons and activities ... it would be impossible for me to teach every single one of them! I'd be teaching language arts all day long, the entire year! ;) ) If students need to spend more time on a story and the accompanying lessons, that's okay, too. When you know your students well, you'll be able to determine how much time is needed for each lesson. It takes time to familiarize yourself with the curriculum, too. (Hopefully your teaching team can help you do that.) Just adapt your teaching to the needs of your 1st graders, and you'll do fine!

    Have a great school year!
    ~ Jaicie :)
     
  7. mmis

    mmis Companion

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    Aug 3, 2006

    We use a basal at my school but with such an effort to try and expose children to so many different types of literature- we only use the basal one or 2 days. Sometimes I skip it altogether if I don't think the story is the best choice for what my students need. If I'm using the story 1 day in my teaching, I sometimes use the basal as a center activity. The students will read the story together in the center and then do an activity related to the story- a retelling, a questioning activity, a vocabulary search using the glossary, etc.
     

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