1st Grade HELP!!!

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by lisabug, Sep 13, 2005.

  1. lisabug

    lisabug Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2005

    I am a new 1st grade teacher having MAJOR behavor issues in my classroom. I can not for the life of me get my students to LISTEN or follow directions. My school uses 1-2-3- Magic as a displine plan, in addition, students in my room earn tickets to help them get into the treasure box.

    We created our own rules. 1) Keep Hands and Feet to Ourselves 2) Respect Ourselves and Others 3)Try our Hardest 4)Follow Directions 5) Use Whisper Voices.

    No matter what I try students are STILL talking while I am talking (I repeat myself 5000 times), playing while walking in the halls (we take hallway timeouts), lining up noisy (we sit back down). In the classroom, we are play fighting, stealing other students things, and just downright being rude and disruptive.

    My other teacher's and administrator's say I must not be implementing 1-2-3 Magic right....but they do not care about the consequences. Can you think of some good consequences? Do you have tricks/tips to getting them to listen and stay seated in their seats? I know it is only our 2nd week of school but I am trying to curb this negative behavior before it gets completely out of control.

    THANKS!!!!
     
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  3. Jaicie

    Jaicie Rookie

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    Sep 13, 2005

    You must be so frustrated! I'm SO sorry that your kiddoes are giving you a rough time! That must really wear you out.

    Are you familiar with Love & Logic by Jim Fay? I've taught 1st and 2nd grade for 9 years now and just started using Love & Logic this fall (3 weeks ago!). I really love it! :D It has completely changed my thinking about behavior management and working w/ kids in general. I think it's helping me become a better teacher, and I'm really developing a positive rapport with my little kiddoes, who are VERY needy and at-risk and come from poverty. (Two are BD, 7 have been diagnosed w/ ADHD!)

    If you'd like more info, please feel free to send me a private message any time! You might also like to check out the Love & Logic website and the loveandlogicforum, which is a message board for teachers and parents.

    Good luck and hang in there!

    ~Jaicie :)
     
  4. Rosieo

    Rosieo Enthusiast

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    Sep 13, 2005

    I don't know what 1-2-3- Magic is but the first few weeks of school for me is all about estalishing guidelines and rules for the kids. I model and we practice and when they forget we practice again and if they forget again we practice again. This goes on and on for all of our classroom rules. It is very timeconsuming the first few weeks of school but it DOES pay off. Within in few weeks the kids do know how to behave or should I say what is expected from them. Oh yes we still have to give reminders throughout the year but establishing guidleines right from the start is so important!
     
  5. wdwteach

    wdwteach Cohort

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    Sep 13, 2005

    I will probably catch it for saying this but I have been trained in Love and Logic and I find it very trendy. An emotional 6 year old is anything but logical and I do not have time to Logic my way through every little problem they have. I teach 1st in a challenging school and I model the expectation for as long as it takes. I BRAG on the kids that follow 1st request and reward the class with a sticker on the Brag Bear Board when someone else comments positively about them. When they fill up a brag chart, they get a small class treat like a frozen capri sun slushy or a potato chips snack. I act shocked when someone is not following the rules and I kindly, with a smile, ask them to change a card on my behavior chart. Positive works so much better than negative. Don't get me wrong, I have high expectations and I do not lower them. I am strict but I have appreciative kids hugging me and trying to please me all day.
     
  6. cristib

    cristib Rookie

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    Sep 16, 2005

    i have the same class! this is my 4th year teaching first grade and i have never seen a class like it! they are immature, impulsive, and rude. lisabug- you're not alone!
     
  7. jpre-k teacher

    jpre-k teacher Companion

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    Sep 16, 2005

    As for them talking while you are talking, stop talking until they are ready to listen. Usually all I need to say with my kids is, "Well, I see lots of people who are not listening, so I am going to just wait until we are ready to show good manners and listen." My kids were also having trouble walking in the hallway. They were OK with me, but as soon as another teacher or my assistant was with them in the hallway, they would go crazy. So, we took some time one morning to practice lining up and walking in the hallway and on the stairs. I told them that if they wanted to be trusted in the hallway, then they needed to walk safely and be considerate of others by keeping their voices down. I said we would practice it until they showed me they could be responsible. They HATED it, and their behavior has been much better.
     
  8. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Sep 17, 2005

    As jpre-k teacher said practice usually works. I would make them do it during a recess. I know it would stink to use your own time but once or twice and they should get the picture!
    Do you have a flip card system? I would set one up in your classroom. I so miss it. If they do something that isn't allowed give a warning, next time flip to yellow (which is really a warning), then flip to blue which means they loss five mins of recess, if you flip again it's a note home to parents and if you have to flip again off to the principal....... Our school used pink as the starting color (so if they had pink for a whole trimester they got to go to an icecream party or something they were given one chance to be on yellow, because we can't be perfect everyday).


    Another thing you could do along the same lines as the flip chart is have Fun Friday, if you can find another first grade teacher to work with you. Student if they stay on pink/green what ever color you choose to be on top all week get to do a fun activity at the end of Friday. The naughty kids go to the other room, so you would get all of the other classes good students, and your naughty would go to the other classroom. The next week you would take the naughty ones.

    Remember to follow throw with what ever your consequences are. If you don't the children are going to walk all over you. If you can't think on your feet and they are being naughty. Tell them you to go sit at their desk and think about their behavior. When your done teaching the rest of the class you will let them know their consequence.
     
  9. RCSK5

    RCSK5 New Member

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    Sep 17, 2005

    Im sorry for your dilemma. The first weeks are so hard and very crucial in how your year will go. I work real hard on establishing rules at the beginning so that I know each child knows what is expected. I have the possitive side of discipline that I try to concentrate on the most which is hard because it's so easy to point out the negative- but that frustrates. I use helping hands that I've cut from felt. My chart for helping hands has each child's name and a row of velcro for the hands to stick to. As I go through the day I pick times where I stop and reward hands on the chart to those who have followed classroom rules. I have a prize shelf numbered according to amount of helping hands. I don't have buy anything because we recycle toys from McDonalds and other fast food places. If you let the parents know they're usually glad to get rid of these small toys. At the end of the day the children count their helping hands and pick from the appropriate numbered prize bin. I have used this for 7 or 8 years and it works for me. One of the other teachers uses jewels and treasure chests for each child instead of helping hands. Yes, we have the negative but the positive has worked with most of the children.
     
  10. lsc

    lsc Rookie

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    Sep 30, 2005

    This may sound so simple that you won;t believe it works but I have a compliment chain. I use paper clips that I hang from a high spot in the room. Each time they get a compliment( and I make sure the other teachers know I am doing this so when they walk in they can compliment) for woring quietly or walking in a straight line, or listening to PE teacherr, music etc. I add a paper cip when the chain reaches the florr they get ice cream or a special treat the next day. They love it I think because it's visual and thy see it growing.
     
  11. Rosieo

    Rosieo Enthusiast

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    Sep 30, 2005

    I like that idea. I think I will try it. Thanks!
     
  12. TeachGrd1

    TeachGrd1 Rookie

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    Oct 1, 2005

    I'm sorry your year has started off so rough!

    I teach first grade also. I have a stoplight system for behavior management and I use positive rewards for groupwork. The groups following directions get monkeys added when all the monkeys are gone the group w/the most gets a prize. I also reward positive behavior by adding letters to the words free time. If the class gets all the letters we have some sort of organizied free time. At the beginning of school, I heavily relyed on the rewards, now I very rarely add letters/monekys to increase positive behavior. I will also add that the more positive you are and the more you reward positive behavior, the better. First graders really do want to please.

    I would also like to comment about Love and Logic. I used this method so often when I worked with fifth graders, but with first graders I haven't found it to be beneficial. First graders seem to need to be told what is right and wrong, not questioned about it.

    I hope that everything gets better. Stay happy and strong!
     
  13. LycoManda

    LycoManda Rookie

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    Nov 30, 2005

    I looked up some information about the Love and Logic technique mentioned above...hope this is a help!! Thank you to the person who suggested this strategy by Tim Fay!! I enjoyed learning about it!


    Love and Logic Basics
    By Leah Davies, M.Ed.
    In their book, Teaching with Love and Logic: Taking Control of the Classroom, Jim Fay and David Funk offer educators alternative ways to communicate with their students. The Love and Logic process includes sharing control and decision-making, using empathy with consequences, and enhancing the self-concept of children. They assert that their methods lead to improved student behavior and achievement.

    The Love and Logic philosophy states the importance of adults providing limits in a caring way. It involves building students up so they feel more capable, even after being disciplined. When interacting with students, educators need to stay calm and avoid provoking, threatening, moralizing or lecturing. Fay and Funk recommend that educators use polite statements that are enforceable and offer children choices within limits, thus avoiding power struggles. Discipline is maintained with compassion and understanding. They describe childhood misbehavior as an opportunity for helping children grow through their mistakes. Their methods help children learn to be responsible and gain self-confidence.

    These authors value children and place a heavy emphasis on the importance of treating them with respect and dignity. They contend that successful teachers know that they must build a positive relationship with their students because they cannot make children do their best by being angry with them. They assert that sharing control and stopping undesirable behaviors early are most effective, and that getting to know students on a personal basis can have many benefits.

    One of their suggestions for working with a troublesome student was to try an experiment. For six times over a period of three weeks, say something like, "I noticed ... that you like horses (basketball, rocks, rap, etc.)" or "I noticed that you enjoy running, (spelling, helping others, etc.)" The book stressed not to include praise or judgment in the statement and to use the "I noticed..." prefix. They also proposed that at times you may want to ask, "Will you try that just for me?" They also suggest that the teacher may want to ask, "Will you try that just for me?" if a child has an especially low feeling of self-worth.

    Fay and Funk maintain that the best way to gain student cooperation is to provide many choices throughout the day, thus building up a bank account of shared power. But, when discipline is needed, they warn that offering two choices, one you like and one you do not like, is not effective because the student will most often pick the one you don't want. Instead, they propose that teachers only offer two acceptable choices, and if the child does not choose one within ten seconds, the educator chooses for him or her. Students soon realize that the consequence of not choosing an option is that the teacher will make the choice. They recommend saying something like:


    "You can either play in the block area or the home living area. It is your choice. You decide."
    "Would you rather sit and read or work on your project?"
    "What would be best for you to play kick ball or to watch the others?"
    "Feel free to sit in the chair by me or remain quiet in your seat."
    Fay and Funk suggest that teachers use "enforceable statements" rather than angry, negative comments. For example:

    "I will begin when everyone is quiet" instead of saying "I'm not going to start until you are quiet."
    "I know you have something important to say, and I listen to students who raise their hand and are called on to participate" rather than, "Raise your hand if you want to talk and wait to be called on."
    "You may join us outside as soon as you complete your work" rather than, "Do your work or you can1t go outside!"

    The Love and Logic thinking requires children to experience consequences for their mistakes. When a problem occurs, they recommend that the adult start with an empathetic comment and end with the logical consequence. The absence of adult anger causes children to think and learn from their mistakes, helps them accept responsibility for their behavior, and decreases the "it's not my fault" attitude. Fay and Funk advise not arguing with students or giving in to their protests, but simply stating your concern and the consequence again if necessary. This way, by providing a choice, the students feel some control over the outcome for their behavior. The authors recommend using empathy with consequences because they assert that children learn more from their choices when an adult does not scold or moralize, but expresses sincere understanding. When the child chooses not to do his or her homework, the teacher could say with sincerity...

    "That's too bad. That zero will have to be averaged with your other grades."

    Or, if the a child does not do his or her work, the teacher could say,

    "I'm so sorry you chose to play instead of doing your work. I'm sad that you have to loose part of your recess."


    Fay and Funk contend that delaying a consequence rather than providing an immediate one can bring more satisfactory results. They state that dealing with a problem on the teacher's terms, with short, kind interactions work best. For example, if a child swears in class, the teacher might calmly say, "That language is unacceptable in my room. I will have to do something about it, but I am not sure what I will do. Right now I am busy teaching so I will let you know tomorrow." They contend that saying, "Don't worry about it," can have the opposite effect on the student.

    The authors share many more practical suggestions on helping children become responsible and guiding them to solve their own problems. They recommend saying, "You can solve your problem anyway you want as long as your solution does not cause a problem for anyone else." The "anyone else" includes the teacher. The Love and Logic principles work best if an entire school staff studies and supports the concepts.
    R E F E R E CN C E
    Fay, Jim, and David Funk (1995). Teaching With Love And Logic: Taking Control Of The Classroom. Golden, CO: The Love and Logic Press, Inc.
     
  14. knittingbec

    knittingbec Comrade

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    Dec 1, 2005

    I had a really rough class last year... I felt like I tried everything to get them to listen-well, just 3 or 4 of them, but it seemed like hundreds!
    I used a marble jar with red and green stones, red stones for stop behaviors and green for good ones. I used it in conjunction with the color card system like the ones mentioned above. Every card change earned a red stone, every green card earned a green one. At the end of each week, we pulled a stone from the jar and got a small treat if it was green. Nothing happened if it was red, and we talked about how the only way we can be sure to get green is to not have any red stones!
    At the beginning of each week I also did a compliment thing. I put dashes on the board to represent the letters of the treat. _ _ _ _ _ and then each compliment earned a letter. I liked it because I could make it simple- chips or difficult- popsicles or anything in between. They had to earn all of the letters by Thursday so I would know if I had to go to the grocery store.
    I also had a raffle box, and turning in homework on-time, having a card on green or being 'caught' being kind to another student would earn a ticket. I filled the raffle box mostly with parent donations- when they cleaned out toy boxes.
     
  15. Miss.H

    Miss.H Rookie

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    Jan 3, 2006

    some helpful suggestions

    Sorry to hear that you are having a hard time. I also had year one last year and it was really difficult. They didn't want to listen either.

    i did find though that if you pick a particular spot to stand in the room(e.g. next to the blackboard) and you tell your students that when you are standing in that exact position that is their cue to be quiet. Don't speak once you are there, just simply wait. With a bit of practise the children will be ready to listen.


    I also used a "Gotcha" chart for individual rewards. I had lilypads numbered 1 to 9 and one large frog picture that said 'Gotcha". Each child had a star with their name on it beginning at number one. When i caught the children doing the right thing, i told them to move their name along the Gotcha chart (one lilypad at a time). When they got to the frog, they could choose a prize from the treasure chest. Once they had chosen their prize they would go back to number one and the process starts again.

    This worked because it was a continuous chart and you never have to rub it clean or start a new chart.

    You can change the theme. When we did a pirate theme. i used treasure maps instead of lilypads, a treasure chest for the final prize and little pirates with their names on them to go around the chart.

    The main thing to remember is BE CONSISTENT. i realised that is where I went wrong.

    Hope I have been of some assistance.:)
     

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