116 students?too many for a private school?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Miticageta21, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. Miticageta21

    Miticageta21 Rookie

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    Aug 8, 2013

    Our students keep enrolling and our classes sizes keep increasing?
    It is my third year teaching at a private catholic school. I have up to 26 students in one class. Some teachers have 13, 14 and others 29-30 even in honors. I feel like it will be really hard to handle bigger classes than I am used to: max 23.
    Any tips for how to keep them all engaged and how make them all participate? they are all juniors and seniors and the class is trig + adv. algebra all regular. I am usually calling on them while I teach, offering help before school (the ones who really need the extra help, don't always take advantage of it). I am sometimes calling them to the board to solve problems. They often work in small groups to review for bog tests and in pairs to work on smaller class assignments.

    Any other tips?

    Also, in my first day of school I noticed that one student was not taking notes and I called on him and it showed that his mind wasn't there. I told him nicely that not taking notes will hurt him in the future and he said "yes mam" but he still was taking only some notes. Any other tips you have to determine students like him to take notes? Most of my students do take notes. I used to get mad at those who don't but I don't really have consequences for this behavior except ot hurts their grade, but they don't see that as a result of not taking notes..


    Thanks
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 8, 2013

    Honestly, this isn't all that many students in a class. It might be more than you're used to, but it's the norm in many parts of the country. You'll manage.
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I agree with Caesar--the class sizes aren't that large.

    As far as note-taking, one thing I would suggest is being sure that the students know how to take notes. Teach a few mini-lessons to reinforce concepts, and more detailed small group lessons for those who need them. You may also consider giving small quizzes (one or two questions) and allowing the students to use their notes to help them.
     
  5. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    116 is reallllly reasonable! You'll be just fine.

    I'm going to echo MrsC. A lot of kids have no idea how to take notes. Do a few mini lessons.
     
  6. Barbd

    Barbd Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2013

    I work in a small charter that has 120-125 students. I have upwards of 20 kids in a class. I feel lucky not to have almost 30 because it is standard.

    Try graphing organizers for note taking. A lot of kids will write way too much, hardly anything or all the wrong things. Let them know what to write in the beginning and you will find it easier in the end.
     
  7. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    In a private school that is a lot of students. I normally average 60-70 students per year and I have taught in large and small private schools. As a parent, I would have been furious if my child was in a class of 30 because one of the things you pay for in private school is smaller class size. I always make sure that my classes are capped at 20-22 students. I like less than 20 in a class.
     
  8. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Aug 9, 2013

    Those classes seem tiny to me! I have 38 and have had up to 42 (and I know Caesar has had even more). Your teaching methods seem fine. As far as getting students to take notes, I agree on giving a mini-lesson on what they should be doing, but as the old saying goes, you can lead a horse to water...some will just decide they're not going with the program.
     
  9. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Aug 9, 2013

    116 is small. Many public schools have between 700-1000+ students K-5. While private schools tend to have a bit less in class size, one must be realistic to how low it can go. If class size gets too low, expenses such as teacher salaries and benefits can't be paid. This often means class sizes of an average of 24 or more. If you have some classes with 13, then your school will need some larger classes to balance it out.

    I teach in a private school and I have had less than 24 several times, but I also had 29 one year. It really wasn't that bad. All of the classes were less than the 32 I had my first year teaching public school.
     
  10. eddygirl

    eddygirl Companion

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    Aug 9, 2013

    I am also in a private catholic high school and our class sizes average around 30, however, there have been years when I've had up to 35 students in a class.

    As far as notetaking, I tell my kids that I give open-note quizzes sometimes. They seem more motivated to take notes when they know they might be using them for a quiz.
     
  11. nyteacher29

    nyteacher29 Comrade

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    Aug 9, 2013

    Lowest class size is 30 highest can be 32. I usually have 150 students a year

    I also agree with others in regards to graphic organizers (Cornell notes perhaps) and teaching them how to take notes. Use short hand, common words don't need to be recorded, etc
     
  12. Miticageta21

    Miticageta21 Rookie

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    Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I like the idea of giving them open books quizzes so I can determine them to take notes. I am wondering though of the graphic organizers are any good. Everyone takes notes the way they understand them I think and I don't write everything I say on the board since it's math so they do need to write down everything that I say. I might give them an open books quiz next time. Thanks
     
  13. Miticageta21

    Miticageta21 Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2013

    I teach 116 students. The school has a bout 900 students total and the principal wants to increase the number! He started accepting students from public schools and they don't always meet the expectations.
     
  14. CindyBlue

    CindyBlue Cohort

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    Aug 10, 2013

    I use a modified Cornell note taking system - they must use it for HW, and are encouraged to use it for notes. I have found that many do not have a good note taking system that works for them, so I teach it. This way they have at least one solid method, and can adjust it to their needs after they know it well.
     
  15. rae85

    rae85 Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2013

    Gosh, I wish my class sizes were like yours! I have 6 classes of 7th graders (total of 158 students!).

    I will be doing lots of small group work.

    As far as notes go, I give them a sheet of the notes but leave blanks that they need to fill in. That way, the students know the notes will be collected and graded, and it'll be easy for you to grade since you just have to see if the blanks are correctly filled in.
     
  16. ScubaSteve

    ScubaSteve Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2013

    For those of us in public schools, having a class as small as 26 would be a dream come true. I'm at about 35 per class, 207 total across all my classes. And then there's an afterschool program I run, and the college class I teach, and some little ones I'm involved with a couple times each week. It's a wonder I can remember my own name much less any student names.
     

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