1-Year-Only Contracts

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Penguin2, Jun 4, 2009.

  1. Penguin2

    Penguin2 Rookie

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    Jun 4, 2009

    What do you all think of signing a one-year-only contract? I just graduated in May and have an offer at a private school, but just got an offer in a public school, where I would make $14,000 more, BUT...it is a one-year-only. I don't know what to do?!?! Any advice or info about one-year-only contracts? Will I get the same salary and benefits as I would if it was not a one-year-only?
     
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  3. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    It really depends on the district. In my area all of the districts give long-term subs the same salary and benefits that probationary teachers would make. You might have to contact someone in HR to find out. Congratulations on the job offers!
     
  4. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    In my district, all new teachers are hired on a one year contract until you have tenure. I really think that is the practice of most districts/schools everywhere. Where you offered a longer contract at the private school??

    Congrats on the job offers ;)
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I'd take the one-year position. At many public schools, those one-years turn into regular positions very often.

    Plus, $14k is a lot of money.
     
  6. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    It will vary from state to state and district to district. Here, in some districts, until your 3rd year, you are under a one year contract, though you get the same benefits as all the other teachers. The one year contract could always turn into long term.
     
  7. Irma

    Irma Companion

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    I agree. Take the one year because it could get your foot in door.
     
  8. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    I agree... here you don't EVER start out with more than a one-year contract... unless you teach something they need like Music, Math and Science (and maybe French)
     
  9. Daisha

    Daisha Companion

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    In our district, as well as the whole state, one year contracts is what you get everywhere. Each year the teacher unions go and negotiate the teacher's contracts.

    Congratulations on the job!:)
     
  10. goopp

    goopp Devotee

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    All of our contracts are one year, but unless you do something REALLY wrong, they are renewed every year.
     
  11. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    All new teachers in Texas are only offered one year contracts their first year.
     
  12. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    I have a one year contract and I'm not really bothered by it--- my private school is pretty good at keeping on staff. They'd rather invest professional development $$ than dump you. I wouldn't worry about the 1 year deal regardless of it being public or private--- I love where I work :)
     
  13. mstnteacherlady

    mstnteacherlady Cohort

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    We are also on one-year contracts. Union reps meet to discuss changes and the contracts are renewed yearly.
     
  14. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Ditto what everyone is saying.

    One-year contracts are the norm.

    And you're talking $14K.

    Go for it!
     
  15. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    All of the non-tenure contracts in my district are one year and are renewed annually. Once you have tenure, your contract is renewed annually but its basically until you retire or resign.

    I'd check with HR to be sure, but I think the public school job sounds great.
     
  16. mulberry

    mulberry New Member

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    As a first-year teacher, without tenure, wouldn't ANY contract essentially be a one-year contract?

    I suppose a one-year-only might be to replace a teacher who's taking maternity leave or something like that, but even so if you impress them they'll probably find another place for you next year.

    That's my feeling, anyway. I'm a first year teacher this coming year too.
     
  17. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    There are some jobs that are one-year only contracts -- which are not subject to renewal. These are usually funded by specific grants. No matter how good you are, they will not be renewed. That being said, you still have nothing to lose. Even if it were a grant position, you will be meeting and getting to know the people who hire for the other positions, and what better way to get your foot in the door?

    I would jump on the chance.
     
  18. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    All teacher contracts in our district are year to year. It is not a big deal unless you are not certified.
     
  19. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    When you are non-tenured, technically EVERY year is a one year contract...
     
  20. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    I don't think the OP is talking about a regular contract. It is true that any teaching job is contracted year-to-year. But that is a special classification of jobs called "one-year contracts." This classification is used for jobs that are funded by specific grants that the district does not plan on "picking up" when the grant ends. These are sometimes one year "gimmes" when you don't meet some goal, and the district feels that adding another teacher will take the burden off, or will provide support services, etc. These jobs, technically, cease to exist at the end of the one-year contract. There is no job at the end of the year.

    What that means is this -- 99% of teachers are hired one way, the typical way, and if they do a good job and there is no shift in demographics, they will have a job the next year.

    A one-year contract job is a job that only exists THIS year. You could be the best thing since sliced bread, but at the end of the year, the job is over. Period. End of statement. No matter how good you are, there will be no renewel option.

    If somehow they get grant funding again for the next year, you have to reapply, and it is again "your first year." You are never on the tenure with this type of contract.

    This is different than the regular way most teachers work.

    I still think you'd be wise to try it. You will be working among others who will see how well you are doing. It will lead to other opportunities within that district. I can't tell you how many times we've hired "one year contracts" for an open position the next year.

    But to the OP, just be aware -- time served on this type of a one-year contract job does not count towards tenure if the district has another position and at the end of the year decides you are the perfect fit for it and offers it to you. It usually will count towards experience, but at the end of the first year, you will still be 3 years away from tenure. If you are offered a different job at that school for the next year, you will still have to attend all of the "first year teacher" programs. It is like you are a new hire again. It is annoying, but it can still lead to just what you want.
     
  21. ~mrs.m~

    ~mrs.m~ Comrade

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    Jun 6, 2009

    Ditto what Tasha said... My district in Texas only give one year contracts. Twenty seven years ago they would give a two year contract (when I first started) but that has been long gone. I'd go with the public school. It could go toward your retirement, which is something young teachers don't always think about. Good luck. Plus that's a huge salaray difference!!
     

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