1:1's

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by ZoomZoomZOOM, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Aug 18, 2010

    I've had a little experience with 1:1's during student teaching - - but since they weren't mine, per se, I'm not quite sure what to expect of them. Can anyone who's had experience with them give me some pointers? For example, should they stick to their kid like glue? Or do you have them mingle a little so their kiddo doesn't become too dependent on them? Also, what's the general rule if their student is absent that day? Do they leave or stick around?

    :help:
     
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  3. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 18, 2010

    In my experience, they don't really need to stick to the kid like glue, but they need to really be watching to be sure that all needs are met.

    In Texas, we only had 1:1s if a kid had severe medical issues (seizures, tube fed, etc.) or severe behavioral issues (biting others, biting self).

    Here in NJ, they give them out like candy!! I am glad that my two kids who have 1:1s have them, though. Out of 8 kids, I have 6 that are on a PreK to 1st level, and the two (with 1:1s) are on a 18-24 month level... so it would be pretty tough to keep them engaged and meet their goals in a small group setting.

    My one kid is super hyper and seriously runs around the room if nobody is watching her, but that's also an issue. The hope is that we could eventually get rid of the 1:1 once she is able to gain the basic attending and pre-academic skills. So that's when I want the 1:1 to be close to her, to keep her from doing that, lol. But, we also have specific training and instructional periods where we "test" my student without having the 1:1 around, (i.e. leaving m&ms on the counter and the 1:1 leaving the area) lol that was a huge bust the first few times we tried it.

    For the most part, my kids who have 1:1s really do need them around for the majority of the day. I have one 1:1 who is AWESOME with helping the other kids, following through with the classroom behavior system, etc. Sometimes I'll hang with "her kid" and let her run an Edmark lesson, etc. because she's in school to be a teacher and loves trying everything out.

    If their student is absent, they usually do data stuff that day. I have my kids with 1:1s on MAJOR individualized programming with complete data analysis for literally every step (even wiping butts... no seriously, I have a task analysis for the bathroom and they take data on every step completed independently in the bathroom). So, a day to get caught up on graphing the data, going over new programming, creating new programming, cutting out PECS cards for the school PECS book or home PECS book, etc. There is plenty for them to do. If for some reason they don't have something to do, I give them something to do. They are not permitted to "just leave" as their job is every day. There's one para at our school who just gets office assignments every day for the first three weeks because her kid is in Pakistan until nearly October - every year! But, the contract is the contract, so they can't say hey you, you start in October....

    I would be fairly certain that you come up with daily schedules for your 1:1 kiddos... so the paras know what they're supposed to be doing with them. I have received the feedback that the day was MUCH more smooth once A) specific programming was provided to be delivered by the para and B) specific suggestions on what to do each period and how time should be spent, -- in writing to look at (on an agenda clipboard or something). I didnt' want to be "bossy" - but was told it was way easier once I just said "ok do this, this, this, and this." and wrote it all down.

    Hope that helps!!
     
  4. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 18, 2010

    What is the reasoning for your kiddos to have 1:1s? That would also be helpful so I can give you tips that are appropriate, lol.

    My two kids are just significantly lower in academic and self-help skills (both need toileting assistance) and really could not function in my classroom unless they have 1:1 assistance.

    Cheaper than out of district!
     
  5. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Aug 18, 2010

    Yeah, that's what my two seem like, judging by their IEPs. One of them is a runner and the other one will do things like take her clothes off if she gets too hot.

    So basically you're saying you take data on their goals - right? You mentioned task analysis for bathrooming. Is that because that student has a bathrooming goal? Or are you just taking data on EVERYTHING?

    Last year it was just me and the classroom para. 99% of my "data" was observation only. I don't think I'm going to be able to get away with that this year though. I have a parent that's going to be watching my every move. Might not be a bad thing to do task analysis for her goals - - except she's coming from elementary and has no life skills/grooming goals yet. BUT, she isn't completely toilet trained yet. How often do you take data on that? Weekly? Daily?
     
  6. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 19, 2010

    The ONLY way that I can do the amazingly informative data collection and analysis that I do -- is with the 1:1s. So, especially with parents who watch every move, data is really a great way to prove progress. AND if you break it up into tiiiiiny little steps, your kids WILL make progress, regardless of what they've done in the past.

    Assuming the kids are mostly NOT able to participate in your group activities (at least meaningfully) - those are good opportunities to get 1:1 instruction in.

    Both of my 1:1 kids have toileting goals. The task analysis in the bathroom allows me to document their every move. I can even say, "she's 47% independent in the bathroom in the mornings, but 67% independent in the afternoons." Or something similar. It also helps me target the area of need (i.e. she gets everything except "pulling the toilet paper off the roll" step every time...) - then I know what we need to work on.

    You can take data on things that the kids don't even have goals on, if they are in areas of need (i.e. the kids aren't toilet trained or have limited self-help skills in the area of bathrooming). That way, when it comes time for the IEP, you can say, "When the year started, AJ was able to complete the bathroom routine (attached) with 5% independence. At this point in time, he has increased to 54% independence. I would like to have a goal in the IEP so that we can get AJ at 90% independence" or something like that. It's great for choosing IEP goals. It also just feels good to look at data to have something on paper that PROVES what you're doing is working (especially for the fun parents). "Stop doing that with her, we don't like it." ---- "Oh, I don't think we should stop - look at this data! She is making amazing progress!"

    Because data and 1:1 programming can be VERY overwhelming, I would start out simple. Pick a few goals that would be able to be achieved in a "discrete trial" format (or even natural environment teaching) - but something you'd be able to have several opportunities and mark a score. Simple things are like matching, imitating, receptive directions, etc.

    Then, take data on those few things (create sheets for your paras to mark info on) - and let them know that once you know the students better, you'll be increasing the amount of individualized programming. I ALWAYS include my kids with 1:1s at the beginning of the day, as thats a very social time. I also include them for cooking, special olympics/leisure stuff, etc. - so they're not just in their little corner doing DTT all day, but they get exposure to the other kids. The nice thing is that when we are doing something that is NOT appropriate, they have something to do with the paras. There are days where data doesn't get taken (Community Trips, big projects in the room, etc.) - but for the most part I have daily data points.

    Last year, I had ten "programs" running for my 1:1 kid. I expected the para to get data on each of those programs, as well as other functional routines that includes teeth brushing, bathroom, morning routine, dismissal routine, and PECS data. It is do-able - as there is a LOT of time in the day when you just have one kid with you.
    I started with 5 and worked up to 10.

    Now for the beginning of school, I have two 1:1 kids, and I'll start out with 5 programs each. Wrote them over the summer (you saw the posts about my data analysis, etc.) - those are for those kids.

    If you want to PM me a few of the kids goals, I could brainstorm which programs would work well for them. I have a ton of pre-written programs on my computer that I could also send you (with graphs!!!)

    Do you have a copy of the ABLLS-R available to you? This is an invaluable resource (Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills) for coming up with skills to work on for lower-functioning students. It also is a method of showing progress over time (you fill in little boxes in different colors at different times (2009 is red, 2010 is blue, 2011 is green) etc. AWESOME way to document OVERALL achievement in a placement setting.

    [​IMG]

    Hope this is more helpful than it is overwhelming.
    You are an organized person - and you seem like you'd like the data like I do - once you find a way to set it all up. :)
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 19, 2010

    Just as an example to show you the great documentation that the ABLLS-R provides, here is page one of an ABLLS graph for one of my kids. Green was what student could do in Sept. 2009 and Yellow is what the student acquired over the year (June 2010).


    http://www.mediafire.com/file/1dys6hbu9tvarmf/ABLLS_R.pdf

    I looked at this about 35 times a day after we completed the June assessments. I was so proud of my student and myself.
     
  8. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Aug 19, 2010

    Interesting - and yeah, I really like how you can chart progress - although I didn't understand the graph at all besides the headers and how much more yellow there was than green. ;) (Good job, Teacher!!) I looked up the program just out of curiosity and saw the price tag (OUCH) so I guess I would have to make up my own graphs. I don't have a problem doing that. It's just making myself DO it instead of think about it. And I agree, this stickler parent will drool over hard data. This student has academic goals only. Like one of them is "Given a set of known reading words and given a verbal dictation of a 3 word sentence using the set of words to construct the dictated sentence and will use one inch lined paper to copy the sentence legibly." Hmm. I think she left some words out of there. :) Here's a math goal; "Given a worksheet with six single digit addition problems with visual aids, XXX will compute the problems with gestural prompts."

    So these academic goals are pretty cut and dry. You either do it or you don't. Not really much a task analysis to do with that. HOWEVER, her 1:1 was in today and was helping me cut out laminated MORNING FOCUS pages (thank you very much) and she said, "You know XXX isn't going to do that work." !! So I'm wondering if she might have a life skill goal of sitting at her desk and doing her work for 5 mins. 10 mins. 20 mins. etc. Which sucks 'cause I really wanted to do Morning Focus as whole group instruction...
     
  9. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    Aug 19, 2010

    Could morning focus be done right in the morning first thing? and then they all can begin their work?
     
  10. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 19, 2010

    Wow! Those are quite the goals for a kid who "needs a 1:1!" My kids who need 1:1s can't recognize their name, go to the bathroom without assistance, and would get lost if someone wasn't at their side at all times.... :eek:

    At any rate, just because the goals are specific (which is actually very helpful in the case of data!!) doesn't mean you can't still create data programs for them. You could simply start taking data on how many times out of ten the student is able to do the 6 digit addition problem with yadda yadda supports, etc. Then you can say in Sept. he/she could do 4 out of 10 problems independently, and now it is December and he/she can do 9 out of 10 problems independently. Know what I mean? The task analysis / breakdown of skills is just something for REALLY LOW or SLOW learners. But a kid with goals like that!? Simply take data on the goals as they are written! Makes it easier for you!!! The other thing is, you can analyze what the kid is having difficult with in order to achieve that goal. Say they always mess up on the 5th digit, or something. You could make your task analysis be:
    1. 4 digit problems
    2. 5 digit problems
    3. 6 digit problems

    Then you could start with 4, set your mastery criteria at 80%, and move to the next "set" (#2- 5 digit problems) after mastery criteria of 80% was met at 4... Make sense??

    It actually makes it WAY EASIER to take data when you have such specific goals and you have a kid that's cognitively able to achieve that goal without breaking it down into 39838943 steps.

    Which ABLLS-R thing did you look at? The book itself is only $80 (I say only, but it's not THAT expensive, and it's a VALUABLE resource for students who aren't quite at the academic level yet and need a lot of those imitation, motor skills, cooperation, attending, pre-academic type things..) There is a kit that is $800 - but you can use things you have in your classroom, you don't need the kit.

    And as far as the graphs, you can download excel versions on the internet for free (or I can send them to you!) if you want to do them on the computer. The book comes with one you can copy and fill in with marker, but I like doing them on the computer so I have hard copies and can send them to parents, team members, etc.

    Oh, and for the record!! What you were looking at is a grid of various skills. Basically each section is labeled with a letter (A-Cooperation, B- Receptive, etc.) Then each skill is labeled with a number... the first cooperation skill is A1, second one is A2, and the book tells you what all of those skills are. You get various scores for various ability levels within those skills, which are the boxes... So, if you wanted to view what specifically was achieved, you could review the book. I usually list out the mastered skills for parents, so they don't have to go through the book to figure out what their kid has done. BUT how nice does the graph look when you can see what was achieved over a year?? I enjoy that part. :lol:

    OH- and for morning focus, I had several kids that had to work up to it. Now, they all sit there for the full 45 minute period. My one kid had to start at 5 minutes. She had to sit nicely at the morning focus table for 5 minutes, and then we moved her up from there. We did 1 minute increments at first, and as she met with success we moved it up. We didn't put the timer out for her, it was more for us, as we didn't want her to rely on the timer, and we also wanted to make the experience successful and positive (so, if she was about to fade out... I could quickly give demands so she could "finish" her part, and end before the meltdown or classroom escape.. yes I have an eloper). So, that's something you could think of. That would be a GREAT task analysis, to really break it down into the 5, 10, 15 minute increments.
    So you'd have:
    Set 1: Student is able to sit and complete work at the group table for a 5 minute period of time.
    Set 2: Student is able to sit and complete work at the group table for a 10 minute period of time.

    and so on. Then you'd have your data sheets saying that the mastery criteria was maybe meeting the individual time (5, 10, etc.) over a period of ___ days. Once met, the student would move to the next set.

    Just a few thoughts.
     
  11. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 19, 2010

    Oh, and also, don't underestimate this kid. Maybe in the past, the group/work wasn't set up structured enough for her to be successful. Perhaps this new environment will be just what she needs! I always set that expectation high from the beginning and sometimes the kids surprise us!!!! Also, para should set the bar high for her, too. It's time for morning focus. We sit at the morning focus table with our teacher. End of discussion. :)
     
  12. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Aug 22, 2010

    Holy mother of...

    I met this little gal yesterday. sk - - check your inbox.
     
  13. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

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    Aug 22, 2010

    teachersk - Its funny to read this as this is what I have been working on all summer. Its a bit overwhelming to break down 10 students programs like this but I'm getting there and am so excited to see how much smoother things will go this year :). Great to read your posts.
     
  14. teach4joy

    teach4joy Rookie

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    Aug 24, 2010

    I have 3 kiddos who have 1:1... 2 of them are are 3rd graders who cognitively are around 9-12months, they need toileting, always put things in their mouth, do not have spatial concept and will run out the door if its left open, climb up tables and chairs, and play with toys inappropriately, they have no academic goals and all writing we do is hand over hand. I have another that is in 2nd grade and has a 1:1 because he has self-injurious behaviors and will also grab other kids (scratch, bit, pull hair...) For him I have to make sure there is an aid with him at ALL times because after tracking antecedents I have realized its throughout the day for everything (protesting, not enough sensory, too much sensory,etc) Although I have 3 1:1's I make sure they are not always working with the same child, I make SURE the CHILD always has an ADULT with him. This helps to give the 1:1's a chance to work with other students, and helps the students not become dependent on one person. I let all the parents know this and it usually helps. If the child is absent then the 1:1 helps with the rest of my students, or does classroom things for me.

    I had a 1:1 two years ago that developed a WAY TO CLOSE relationship with the parent (prior to me teaching) and would tell them EVERYTHING that happened in the classroom, she refused to work with any other students and the parent backed her up. It became really bad when she refused to listen to what I asked her to do and only listen to what parent wanted. Since then I tell my 1:1's that although they are assigned to one child they are EXPECTED to help out with the rest of the students. This could be doing small groups with their student and 1 or 2 others kids. Our class has a much better flow and the kids with 1:1's actually stay part of the group instead of being secluded because they are always working alone. Hope this helps
     
  15. Icare

    Icare Rookie

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    Aug 25, 2010

    Sorry to interrupt and kind go a bit off topic, but this thread caught my eye.

    My son was just evaluated for ABA. He is high functioning but does have area's that he needs help on. Currently he has some goals set in place and some of those goals came from the ABBLS.

    He does not have a 1:1. From what I understand his ABA will be consultation only. So I am confused on how the goals will be implemented by his classroom teachers only? Can you have the same kind of data completed without a 1:1?

    THanks :)
     
  16. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Aug 25, 2010

    Request that it be put into the IEP that it is 1:1
     
  17. Icare

    Icare Rookie

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    Aug 26, 2010

    I did, they denied, I requested a PWN. But my biggest worries is that the gen ed teachers will have to do all of the data that is required for this when really gen ed teachers don't have the time to do so. They need to teach, and teach many kids when you hit high school.
    So any help here guys?
     
  18. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Aug 26, 2010

    Have you received a PWN back yet?

    Would you like a link to a sped advocacy board?
     
  19. amaran20

    amaran20 Rookie

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    Aug 26, 2010

    Icare, does your son have a special education teacher who works with him? If he is in gen ed with an IEP I would think he would. Maybe she will be working with him 1:1 and taking data? If he's high functioning I would imagine it would be very difficult to get a 1:1 aide as here in Florida it's very difficult to get one even for children who are very low functioning.
     
  20. Icare

    Icare Rookie

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    Aug 26, 2010

    Well he is in a study skills class with an RSP, would that be it? I know it's hard getting a 1:1. Especially being high functioning. What frustrates me though is I do know of other parents with HF kids who have had 1:1, so I know it's possible. I just want my sons' needs meet is all. I have no experience with ABA so I don't really know how it works etc....

    Bros, yes thank you, I will email you privately.
     
  21. SistaT

    SistaT Rookie

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    Aug 27, 2010

    The 1:1 students are our school are all very far along the ASD spectrum and very high needs. While none have any major toileting/hygiene issues, they all have significant impulse control/violent tendencies so their teacher needs to be with them at all times.

    Our school is private, so the 1:1 mandate focuses on intensive academics the majority of the time (so integration/inclusion is not emphasized - a personal pet peeve of mine). If the student is absent, we take advantage of that time to review progress and objectives and update ABLLS. We don't have a special program for the ABLLS, so we do it on an Excel spreadsheet -- as long as you have an objectives key (we have our own templates and modify for individual students) your chart will be straightforward. ABLLS can be very time consuming so take advantage of opportunities to update your data whenever you can.

    Also, take the time to revisit goals -- your student may make unexpected progress, or may just need a bit of an adjustment in how expectations are presented in order to be more successful.
     
  22. hillsidefogo

    hillsidefogo Companion

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    Sep 16, 2010

    Teachersk,
    I'm just back 1/2 time in Spec. Ed.(still1/2 time K) after 8 years with full time K. I have a 6 year old student in Spec. Ed. She is not formally diagnosed but is developmently delayed. I am attempting toilet training but could use some help in breaking down the skills needed. She is mobile but with fine and gross motor challenges(she can't independently dress or undress) mostly non-verbal, loves to interact with people but is extremely distractable. She wears 'pull-ups' and seems to indicate when/as she is peeing but is not yet able to indicate when she needs to pee so we can get to the toilet. I'm interested in how you have broken down the toiletting into smaller tasks.

    Also, do you have a thread where you explain your morning focus- it sounds like something I would like to try.

    Thanks!
     

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